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The main streets in the ward are also called ''borghi'' (and not ''vie'' as in the rest of the city); generally speaking, the further you get from St. Peter's, the less touristy the neighbourhood becomes. Of course, always keep in mind that often it's not possible to escape completely the touristy hustle-and-bustle of the city centre.
 
The main streets in the ward are also called ''borghi'' (and not ''vie'' as in the rest of the city); generally speaking, the further you get from St. Peter's, the less touristy the neighbourhood becomes. Of course, always keep in mind that often it's not possible to escape completely the touristy hustle-and-bustle of the city centre.
  
'''Prati''' is the twenty-second, and last, ''rione'' of the city. An elegant district laid out in the late 19th century, it was designed to house (along with the Esquilino neighbourhood and the area around piazza della Repubblica) the civil servants of the newly-established Kingdom of Italy. Unlike the Esquilino - which housed the less wealthy among the State employees - the district was home to the city's rising burgeoisie, and it showed in 1912 when Prati was the first neighbourhood in city to be provided with electricity. Its most important squares are the recently renovated piazza Cavour and piazza del Risorgimento (near the Vatican Museums) while the main boulevard is via Cola di Rienzo, also one of Rome's most famous shopping streets.
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'''Prati''' is the twenty-second, and last, ''rione'' of the city. An elegant district laid out in the late 19th century, it was designed to house (along with the Esquilino neighbourhood and the area around piazza della Repubblica) the civil servants of the newly-established Kingdom of Italy. Unlike the Esquilino - which housed the less wealthy among the State employees - Prati was home to the city's rising burgeoisie, and it showed in 1912 when the neighbourhood was the first to be provided with electricity. Its most important squares are the recently renovated piazza Cavour and piazza del Risorgimento (near the Vatican Museums) while the main boulevard is via Cola di Rienzo, also one of Rome's most famous shopping streets.
  
 
The neighbourhood was built during a time of tensions between the Pope and the Italian state and therefore, city planners designed its street layout in such a way to make impossible for anyone to see St. Peter's dome from its wide and carefully planned streets. The district hosts, among the other things, a Waldensian church (on piazza Cavour).
 
The neighbourhood was built during a time of tensions between the Pope and the Italian state and therefore, city planners designed its street layout in such a way to make impossible for anyone to see St. Peter's dome from its wide and carefully planned streets. The district hosts, among the other things, a Waldensian church (on piazza Cavour).

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