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* A visa (also referred to by UK border officials as ''entry clearance'') is required for citizens of most other countries to enter the UK and a number of countries to transit the UK airside. This can be obtained from the British Embassy, High Commission or Consulate where the applicant legally resides. Unless they are 6 years old or under or travelling directly to the Channel Islands and not passing through the UK or the Isle of Man, UK visa applicants are required to provide biometric data (10-digit fingerprints and a biometric digital photograph) as part of the application process. As part of the visa application procedure, it is necessary to attend a UK visa application centre ''in person'' to provide your biometrics. Check out different types of UK visa here[https://www.migrationexpert.co.uk/visa_uk/].
 
* A visa (also referred to by UK border officials as ''entry clearance'') is required for citizens of most other countries to enter the UK and a number of countries to transit the UK airside. This can be obtained from the British Embassy, High Commission or Consulate where the applicant legally resides. Unless they are 6 years old or under or travelling directly to the Channel Islands and not passing through the UK or the Isle of Man, UK visa applicants are required to provide biometric data (10-digit fingerprints and a biometric digital photograph) as part of the application process. As part of the visa application procedure, it is necessary to attend a UK visa application centre ''in person'' to provide your biometrics. Check out different types of UK visa here[https://www.migrationexpert.co.uk/visa_uk/].
  
* Citizens of China and India who have a valid Irish Short-stay Visa (eligible visa categories: Visit(tourist), Visit(family/friend), Business, Conference/Event) and endorsed with "BIVS" ''and'' who have cleared immigration in Ireland can visit the UK visa-free until their current permission to enter/remain in Ireland expires.
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* On 6th October 2014, the UK Home Secretary and Irish Minister for Justice and Equality signed an agreement that will allow Chinese and Indian Nationals access to the UK and Republic of Ireland using just a single visa by the end of 2014. This means that nationals of those two countries who apply for an eligible Irish visa in China or India after the scheme is rolled out won't need to apply for a separate UK visa to visit the UK if they will enter through the Republic of Ireland first.  The reverse is also true: Chinese and Indian nationals those who apply for an eligible UK visa will no longer need to apply for an Irish visa to visit the Republic of Ireland provided they will enter through the UK first.  Please see this website for details: https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/british-irish-visa-scheme/british-irish-visa-scheme .
  
 
* The United Kingdom has converted the previous visa categories (except for the visitor and transit categories) into a five-tiered points-based system (PBS), meaning that you will be required to satisfy specific and non-negotiable criteria before the visa is issued. Points-based system visa fees are ''very'' high, so it may be wise to see if the purpose of your visit can be satisfied under a different, non-points based system visa. For example, if you want to stay in the UK for 11 months to study an English Language course, it would be cheaper to apply for a short-term student visa (£170), rather than a Tier 4 student visa (£328) - however, unlike the Tier 4 visa a short-term student visa/status does not entitle you to work whilst in the UK (Tier 4 visa holders are allowed to work for a maximum of 20 hours per week during term time).   
 
* The United Kingdom has converted the previous visa categories (except for the visitor and transit categories) into a five-tiered points-based system (PBS), meaning that you will be required to satisfy specific and non-negotiable criteria before the visa is issued. Points-based system visa fees are ''very'' high, so it may be wise to see if the purpose of your visit can be satisfied under a different, non-points based system visa. For example, if you want to stay in the UK for 11 months to study an English Language course, it would be cheaper to apply for a short-term student visa (£170), rather than a Tier 4 student visa (£328) - however, unlike the Tier 4 visa a short-term student visa/status does not entitle you to work whilst in the UK (Tier 4 visa holders are allowed to work for a maximum of 20 hours per week during term time).   
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* Citizens of Australia, Canada, Hong Kong (British National (Overseas) passport holders only), Japan, Monaco, New Zealand, South Korea and Taiwan can apply for a '''Tier 5 Youth Mobility Scheme visa''' (the former Working Holiday visa for all young Commonwealth citizens has been discontinued). The Tier 5 YMS visa allows the holder to undertake a working holiday in the UK for 2 years from the date of issue. Only a limited number of visas are issued for each nationality -- in particular, demand far exceeds supply for Japan and Taiwan. Visit the [https://www.gov.uk/tier-5-youth-mobility UKVI webpage].
 
* Citizens of Australia, Canada, Hong Kong (British National (Overseas) passport holders only), Japan, Monaco, New Zealand, South Korea and Taiwan can apply for a '''Tier 5 Youth Mobility Scheme visa''' (the former Working Holiday visa for all young Commonwealth citizens has been discontinued). The Tier 5 YMS visa allows the holder to undertake a working holiday in the UK for 2 years from the date of issue. Only a limited number of visas are issued for each nationality -- in particular, demand far exceeds supply for Japan and Taiwan. Visit the [https://www.gov.uk/tier-5-youth-mobility UKVI webpage].
  
* There are generally no immigration checks when entering the UK from Ireland. However, visitors who are not Irish or British citizens are still required to meet admission requirements and should carry their passport (with appropriate visa stamps if required).
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* There are generally no immigration checks when entering the UK from Ireland. However, visitors who are not Irish or British citizens are still required to meet admission requirements, and should carry their passport (with appropriate visa stamps if required).
  
 
====Other requirements====
 
====Other requirements====
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====Character concerns====
 
====Character concerns====
  
* The United Kingdom is known to be somewhat laxer than some other countries when it comes to character concerns of visitors. Landing cards do not ask about prior convictions and border/ visa personnel seem to be more concerned about convictions ''inside'' the UK rather than those abroad. That said, if the border officer questions you about criminal history, you must answer truthfully.  
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* The United Kingdom is known to be somewhat more lax than some other countries when it comes to character concerns of visitors. Landing cards do not ask about prior convictions and border/ visa personnel seem to be more concerned about convictions ''inside'' the UK rather than those abroad. That said, if the border officer questions you about criminal history, you must answer truthfully.  
  
 
* If you're applying for a visa or entry clearance, you will have to list any criminal convictions as part of the application, although there are no hard and fast rules regarding who is admissible and who is not: each case is viewed on its own merits and a minor conviction long ago is unlikely to cause problems, especially if your behaviour since then has been good.
 
* If you're applying for a visa or entry clearance, you will have to list any criminal convictions as part of the application, although there are no hard and fast rules regarding who is admissible and who is not: each case is viewed on its own merits and a minor conviction long ago is unlikely to cause problems, especially if your behaviour since then has been good.
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**'''Declared bankruptcy''', no matter how long ago.  
 
**'''Declared bankruptcy''', no matter how long ago.  
 
**'''Been sued for debt''' (i.e. a civil judgement). This is true even if you've satisfied (paid) the judgement or it is no longer legally collectable.
 
**'''Been sued for debt''' (i.e. a civil judgement). This is true even if you've satisfied (paid) the judgement or it is no longer legally collectable.
*: The UKVI takes a dim view of both these situations, as there have been recent abuses of the UK banking and lending system by foreign visitors and immigrants, and unpaid debt or a bankruptcy abroad can be grounds for refusal. Like with criminality, each case is evaluated based on the totality of the circumstances and denial of entry or a visa for credit problems is very unlikely for visitors ''unless'' you owe money in the UK (see below).
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*:The UKVI takes a dim view of both these situations, as there have been recent abuses of the UK banking and lending system by foreign visitors and immigrants, and unpaid debt or a bankruptcy abroad can be grounds for refusal. Like with criminality, each case is evaluated based on the totality of the circumstances and denial of entry or a visa for credit problems is very unlikely for visitors ''unless'' you owe money in the UK (see below).
  
 
*If you have more than £1,000 of unpaid debt <u>in the UK</u>, that is not in good standing, you cannot be issued a visa or granted entry until the debt is paid or satisfactory arrangements are in place to pay it.
 
*If you have more than £1,000 of unpaid debt <u>in the UK</u>, that is not in good standing, you cannot be issued a visa or granted entry until the debt is paid or satisfactory arrangements are in place to pay it.

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