Editing Troy (Turkey)

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The first city on the site of Troy was '''Wilusa''', founded in the 3rd millenium BC by the Hittites, who were the first indigenous Anatolian people to rise to form a state during the Bronze Age. Situated over the Hisarlık Hill on the northwestern tip of [[Along the Troad Coast|Troad Peninsula]], it was clear that the reason for the city's existence in the first place was a total control of Dardanelles, which, along with the Sea of Marmara and the Bosphorus, is today known as the Turkish Straits, a key route connecting Mediterranean with the Black Sea, as well as being where European and Asian landmasses are almost just a stone's throw away from each other.
 
The first city on the site of Troy was '''Wilusa''', founded in the 3rd millenium BC by the Hittites, who were the first indigenous Anatolian people to rise to form a state during the Bronze Age. Situated over the Hisarlık Hill on the northwestern tip of [[Along the Troad Coast|Troad Peninsula]], it was clear that the reason for the city's existence in the first place was a total control of Dardanelles, which, along with the Sea of Marmara and the Bosphorus, is today known as the Turkish Straits, a key route connecting Mediterranean with the Black Sea, as well as being where European and Asian landmasses are almost just a stone's throw away from each other.
  
The abduction of '''Helen''', the spouse of the king of [[Sparta]], by '''Paris''', a Trojan prince, sparked emnity between the Trojans and Achaeans from [[Peloponnese|across the Aegean Sea]], or so says the story. Having been unable to break into the defensive walls of the city, Achaeans decided to set up a trick—they offered a huge '''wooden horse''' as a gift to Trojans, as an amend for the bother they caused with their war galleys on the city's beach. Trojans accepted the offer sincerely, but this resulted in them losing their city, as inside of the horse was full of Achaean soldiers, ready to combat, and now right in the centre of the city.
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The abduction of '''Helen''', the daughter of the king of [[Sparta]], by '''Paris''', a Trojan prince, sparked emnity between the Trojans and Achaeans from [[Peloponnese|across the Aegean Sea]], or so says the story. Having been unable to break into the defensive walls of the city, Achaeans decided to set up a trick—they offered a huge '''wooden horse''' as a gift to Trojans, as an amend for the bother they caused with their war galleys on the city's beach. Trojans accepted the offer sincerely, but this resulted in them losing their city, as inside of the horse was full of Achaean soldiers, ready to combat, and now right in the centre of the city.
  
 
For all its actuality, there ''was'' a '''Trojan War''', which possibly took place in the 12th century BC, and it was around this time Hittite Wilusa was converted to Hellenic '''Illion''', and later '''Troia'''. However, for some reason, all later invaders from all directions, with the notable exception of Alexander the Great (who founded the city of '''Alexandria Troas''' on [[Along the Troad Coast|the coast south of Troy]]), favoured Bosphorus to northeast instead of Dardanelles for their intercontinental crossings. The Roman emperor Constantine I (r. 306-337) agreed as well, founding a new capital for his empire, [[Istanbul|Constantinople]], on the banks of Bosphorus. As Constantinople flourished, its geographical rival Troy declined, eventually disappearing under layers of dirt.
 
For all its actuality, there ''was'' a '''Trojan War''', which possibly took place in the 12th century BC, and it was around this time Hittite Wilusa was converted to Hellenic '''Illion''', and later '''Troia'''. However, for some reason, all later invaders from all directions, with the notable exception of Alexander the Great (who founded the city of '''Alexandria Troas''' on [[Along the Troad Coast|the coast south of Troy]]), favoured Bosphorus to northeast instead of Dardanelles for their intercontinental crossings. The Roman emperor Constantine I (r. 306-337) agreed as well, founding a new capital for his empire, [[Istanbul|Constantinople]], on the banks of Bosphorus. As Constantinople flourished, its geographical rival Troy declined, eventually disappearing under layers of dirt.

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