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It has been a while since I've touched this page, but I haven't given up trying to complete it. In any case, the page already takes up too much memory. Some primary things I think that contribute to it are introducing two writing systems, etc. It dawned on me that I never did the numbers table in Urdu, but unless anyone complains, this is perhaps for the best now, considering space. As much as I like the ''en face'' format of Hindi-Urdu, perhaps splitting up will have to be debated again in the future. As will what to keep and what to prune. I also need to figure out how to write a proper grammer section without going overboard, and choose only the essentials. [[User:Khirad|Khirad]] 20:25, 7 Sep 2005 (EDT)
 
It has been a while since I've touched this page, but I haven't given up trying to complete it. In any case, the page already takes up too much memory. Some primary things I think that contribute to it are introducing two writing systems, etc. It dawned on me that I never did the numbers table in Urdu, but unless anyone complains, this is perhaps for the best now, considering space. As much as I like the ''en face'' format of Hindi-Urdu, perhaps splitting up will have to be debated again in the future. As will what to keep and what to prune. I also need to figure out how to write a proper grammer section without going overboard, and choose only the essentials. [[User:Khirad|Khirad]] 20:25, 7 Sep 2005 (EDT)
 
: Feel free to prune information that you feel isn't necessary, but be aware that there has been some discussion about removing the warnings about page size, so don't let page size be too much of a concern.  My personal opinion is that it is more valuable to have a complete (but well-organized) guide rather than a compact but incomplete guide. -- [[User:Wrh2|Wrh2]] 21:10, 7 Sep 2005 (EDT)
 
 
== Separating Hindi and Devanagari? ==
 
 
The lengthy section on the intricacies of Devanagari is rather intimidating — and it could also be reused for other languages using the same script, eg. [[Nepali phrasebook|Nepali]], Marathi etc.  Would it make any sense to limit this to ''speaking'' Hindi, and shunt out the script stuff into a separate "[[Learning Devanagari script]]" article?
 
 
Note that the basic vowel/consonant stuff and the Devanagari phrases should of course stay in the phrasebook, because they're useful to point at even if you can't read the language. [[User:Jpatokal|Jpatokal]] 08:33, 12 November 2006 (EST)
 
:Good idea. — [[User:Ravikiran r|Ravikiran]] 09:55, 12 November 2006 (EST)
 
 
::Done.  I also tried to hack the phrasebook a bit so it's comprehensible even if you aren't fluent in Devanagari. [[User:Jpatokal|Jpatokal]] 01:23, 16 November 2006 (EST)
 
 
== Copied from the India article ==
 
 
I just cleaned out a whole lot of stuff from India's "Talk" section as it was TMI and was breaking the flow. It may or may not be useful here. — [[User:Ravikiran r|Ravikiran]] 14:24, 20 November 2006 (EST)
 
Hindi is spoken in many dialects .
 
Dialects of Hindi
 
Hindi has more than ten variations. Hindi spoken in Rajasthan is different from Hindi spoken in Bihar or Hindi of Himachal Pradesh. Sometimes the different variations of a language are considered as separate language with their own literature.
 
 
One of the most important dialects is Khariboli (also Khadiboli or Khari dialect), which is spoken in Western and Eastern Uttar Pradesh. Khariboli is the variation of Urdu/Hindi language that is used by the government and taught in schools. It was a rural language in its early days, but after 18th century, people started using it as the literary form of Urdu as its vocabulary contains a large amount of Persian and Arabic words. Almost all the significant modern Hindi literature has been produced in Khariboli.
 
 
Yet another important dialect is the Bihari Hindi spoken by the people of Bihar ,Jharkhand and some parts of Eastern UP like Balia.Lately it has become popular owing to the Politicians and Hindi movies.
 
 
Awadhi - Spoken predominantly in rural centers Central and parts of Eastern Uttar Pradesh. Urban centers speak Khadi Boli. Lucknow, Kanpur, Rae Bareli, Faizabad, Allahabad. However, as we move east of Lucknow, we begin to get a little mix of Bhojpuri as well both in words and accent. Tulsidas' Shri Raamcharit Manas is written in Awadhi. The dialect in Lagaan, Nadiya Ke Paar and songs in Omkara is are Awadhi.
 
 
 
Another dialect is Bambaiya Hindi(also Mumbaiyya )which is spoken primarily in Bombay (Mumbai). On the streets of Bombay, people from every part of India co-exist. Their inter-mingling has created a language that has Hindi/Urdu as a base, but includes words and pronunciations from other languages such as English, Marathi and Gujarati, as well as languages from South India. 
 
 
A third important dialect is Brajbhasa, spoken in the region of Braj. Brajbhasa was the language of choice of the Bhakti movement, or the neo-Vaishnavite religions, the central deity of which was Krishna. Therefore, most of the literature in this language pertains to Krishna composed in medieval times.
 
 
Among the other variations of Hindi, we can inculde Kanauji, Bundeli, Bagheli, Chhattisgarhi (Lahariya or Khalwahi), Hariyanvi (Bangaru or Jatu), Bhaya, Chamari and Ghera Gowli.
 
 
==Some of the weirdo translations==
 
 
Someone has been using ''shuddh Hindi'' which will not get a foreigner anywhere in [[India]]. Someone translated bathroom into ''snaanagraha''. Who, may I ask, refers to it as that!!???? Here are a few suggestions -
 
*Train (Relgaadi)
 
*Car (Gaari, not Vaahan)
 
*Plane (Hawaijahaz, not Viman)
 
*Bathroom (Toilet, by far the most common term for it in Northern India)
 
[[User:Upamanyuwikitravel|Upamanyuwikitravel]] 05:37, 23 February 2007 (EST)
 
 
 
I bet "vimaan" is more common than "hawaaii jahaaz".especially in other parts of indie, e.g. gujarat, maharashtra, bengal, etc. as it is the same word for aeroplane in the respective languages.
 
 
: First of all, try to understand one thing. For example in West Bengal, Hindi is no use in the smaller towns. The only place where people understand Hindi somewhat is Kolkata, where anyway it would be more useful to speak English. The number of people who can read and write English is far greater than the number who can read and write Hindi, as Devanagari is different from the Bengali script.
 
 
: The fact is that the Govt of India tries to promote all this ''Hindi is the lingua franca'' of India rubbish. The fact is, that the lingua franca in an Indian city/town is usually the state language, and NOT Hindi (exception: [[Mumbai]]). For example, a Konkani speaking Mangalorean living in Bangalore, Karnataka will probably understand Kannada, and not Hindi.
 
 
: So this Hindi phrasebook is basically for travelling around the Hindi-speaking belt.
 
And no-one in Delhi or MP or UP will call an aeroplane/airplane a 'vimaan'
 
 
[[User:Upamanyuwikitravel]]
 

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