YOU CAN EDIT THIS PAGE! Just click any blue "Edit" link and start writing!

Editing Sylheti phrasebook

Jump to: navigation, search

Warning: You are not logged in. Your IP address will be publicly visible if you make any edits. If you log in or create an account, your edits will be attributed to your username, along with other benefits.

The edit can be undone. Please check the comparison below to verify that this is what you want to do, and then save the changes below to finish undoing the edit.
Latest revision Your text
Line 117: Line 117:
  
 
===Writing===
 
===Writing===
Although not widely known, Sylheti was formerly written in its own script, Syloti Nagri, (or नागरी, Nāgrī, the name of its parent writing system) similar in style to Kaithi but with differences, though nowadays it is invariably written in Bengali script. Bangladesh does not recognise Sylheti as a separate language, therefore literature, warning signs and notices are all written in the Bengali language.
+
Sylheti was formerly written in its own script, Syloti Nagri, (or नागरी, Nāgrī, the name of its parent writing system) similar in style to Kaithi but with differences, though nowadays it is invariably written in Bengali script. Bangladesh does not recognise Sylheti as a separate language, therefore literature, warning signs and notices are all written in the Bengali language.
  
In the 19th century, the British tea-planters in the area referred to Sylheti as Sylhettia. In Assam, the language is still referred to as Srihattiya, the name used in ancient literature. Sylhet has a rich heritage of literature in the Syloti Nagri script going back at least 200 years. The Sylheti script includes 5 independent vowels, 5 dependent vowels attached to a consonant letter and 27 consonants. The Syloti Nagri alphasyllabary differs from the Bengali alphabet as it is a form of Kaithi, a script (or family of scripts) which belongs to the main group of North Indian scripts of Bihar. The writing system's main use was to record religious poetry, described as a rich language and easy to learn.
+
In the 19th century, the British tea-planters in the area referred to Sylheti as Sylhettia. In Assam, the language is still referred to as Srihattiya, the name used in ancient literature. Although not widely known, Sylheti was written in the Syloti Nagri script. Sylhet has a rich heritage of literature in the Syloti Nagri script going back at least 200 years. The Sylheti script includes 5 independent vowels, 5 dependent vowels attached to a consonant letter and 27 consonants. The Syloti Nagri alphasyllabary differs from the Bengali alphabet as it is a form of Kaithi, a script (or family of scripts) which belongs to the main group of North Indian scripts of Bihar. The writing system's main use was to record religious poetry, described as a rich language and easy to learn.
  
 
During the 1971 Liberation War, when all Syloti Nagri printing presses were destroyed, the writing system came to a halt. After Bangladesh gained independence, the government of the newly formed Bangladesh mandated Bangla studies and the use of the Bengali alphabets as a curriculum to be taught at all levels of education. Efforts to establish Sylheti as a modern language were vigorously opposed by political and cultural forces allied to successive Bangladeshi governments.
 
During the 1971 Liberation War, when all Syloti Nagri printing presses were destroyed, the writing system came to a halt. After Bangladesh gained independence, the government of the newly formed Bangladesh mandated Bangla studies and the use of the Bengali alphabets as a curriculum to be taught at all levels of education. Efforts to establish Sylheti as a modern language were vigorously opposed by political and cultural forces allied to successive Bangladeshi governments.

You may have to refresh your browser window in order to view the most recent changes to an article.

All contributions to Wikitravel must be licensed under the Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike 3.0. By clicking "Save" below, you acknowledge that you agree to the site license as well as the following:

  • If you do not want your work to be re-used on other web sites and modified by other users please do not submit!
  • All contributions must be your own original work or work that is explicitly licensed under a CC-BY-SA compatible license.
  • Text and/or images published on another web site or in a book are likely copyrighted and should not be submitted here!
  • Wikitravel has strong guidelines on links to external web sites. Links to booking engines, hotel and restaurant aggregator sites, or other third-party sites will be deleted.
  • Contributions that appear to be marketing or advertising will be deleted.

To protect the wiki against automated edit spam, we kindly ask you to solve the following CAPTCHA:

Cancel | Editing help (opens in new window)

Templates used on this page: