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{{infobox|Blood on the Mountains|There are several possible explanations for the name of this range, which translates as "Blood of Christ," but the most commonly heard one (although possibly apocryphal) pertains to a Spanish priest who was thought to have been martyred during the Pueblo Revolt of the 17th century.  The dying priest saw alpenglow on the high peaks above timberline at sunset, and exclaimed "Sangre de Cristo!" believing it was a miraculous sign of his impending temporal doom and eternal redemption.  In today's secular world, you can still see the alpenglow from some locations, miracle or no miracle; good viewpoints for sunset viewing at a distance are across the valley near [[Los Alamos]], while the intrepid backpacker who hikes the Winsor Trail  (trailhead near the [[Santa Fe (New Mexico) | Santa Fe]] Ski Basin) to a campsite at Puerto Nambe can get a fine, up-close-and-personal look at the phenomenon on 12,600-foot Santa Fe Baldy.}}
 
{{infobox|Blood on the Mountains|There are several possible explanations for the name of this range, which translates as "Blood of Christ," but the most commonly heard one (although possibly apocryphal) pertains to a Spanish priest who was thought to have been martyred during the Pueblo Revolt of the 17th century.  The dying priest saw alpenglow on the high peaks above timberline at sunset, and exclaimed "Sangre de Cristo!" believing it was a miraculous sign of his impending temporal doom and eternal redemption.  In today's secular world, you can still see the alpenglow from some locations, miracle or no miracle; good viewpoints for sunset viewing at a distance are across the valley near [[Los Alamos]], while the intrepid backpacker who hikes the Winsor Trail  (trailhead near the [[Santa Fe (New Mexico) | Santa Fe]] Ski Basin) to a campsite at Puerto Nambe can get a fine, up-close-and-personal look at the phenomenon on 12,600-foot Santa Fe Baldy.}}
  
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*'''Santuario de Chimayo''', more completely "El Santuario de Nuestro Señor de Esquipulas," is a church in Chimayo that dates to the Spanish mission period with a remarkable reputation for miracles, including healing the sick and lame.  It is on the outskirts of the small town and can be visited for free during daylight hours, although donations are appreciated.  The Santuario is quite famous among the towns of the mountains and is the destination for a unique pilgrimage during the week before Easter (see under '''Do''').
 
*[[Las Vegas]], a town on Interstate 25 on the east side of the mountains (and definitely not to be confused with the rip-roaring city of the same name in [[Nevada]]), has a downtown district with a large number of historic buildings dating to the days when it was a significant stop on the Santa Fe Railway.  Several of these can be visited on a walking tour.
 
*[[Las Vegas]], a town on Interstate 25 on the east side of the mountains (and definitely not to be confused with the rip-roaring city of the same name in [[Nevada]]), has a downtown district with a large number of historic buildings dating to the days when it was a significant stop on the Santa Fe Railway.  Several of these can be visited on a walking tour.
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*'''Picuris Pueblo''', south of Taos on the west side, is one of the highest of the American Indian pueblos of New Mexico and can be toured during daylight hours.  There is a small tribal museum.  As at most Native American pueblos open to the public, a small fee is charged for photography, sketching, etc.
  
 
==Do==
 
==Do==

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