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Round the world overland

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=== Breaks ===
 
=== Breaks ===
The '''Pacific ocean''' is by far the greatest obstacle to completing a circuit around the world overland; There are no ferries between neither Indonesia or New Zealand to Australia, nor are there any sort of regular service from Asia or Australia to the thousands of islands in [[Polynesia]]. Further north the Bering strait between Russia and Alaska doesn't have any scheduled traffic crossing it either. This means you either have to shell out more money than a plane ticket on the [[cruise ships]] that does cover this route - Japan to Alaska is the most economical option - or opt for the option more in the spirit of such a journey; [[Freighter travel]]. New Zealand, which maintains loose association's with a number of small islands in the pacific, sometimes offers for people to join on the semi regular freight routes, supplying these islands, but natives are always given priority, and securing a spot on these trips are not trivial, and requires much perseverance.  
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The '''Pacific ocean''' is by far the greatest obstacle to completing a circuit around the world overland; There are no ferries between neither Indonesia or New Zealand to Australia, nor are there any sort of regular service from Asia or Australia to the thousands of islands in [[Polynesia]]. Further north the Bering strait between Russia and Alaska doesn't have any scheduled traffic crossing it either. This means you either have to shell out more money than a plane ticket on the [[cruise ships]] that does cover this route - Japan to Alaska is the most economical option - or opt for the option more in the spirit of such a journey; [[Freighter travel]]. New Zealand, which maintains loose associations with a number of small islands in the pacific, sometimes offers for people to join on the semi regular freight routes, supplying these islands, but natives are always given priority, and securing a spot on these trips are not trivial, and requires much perseverance.  
  
 
The '''Atlantic''' has similar difficulties, but Cunard Line's[http://www.cunard.com] proud historical ocean liners, still ply the route between Southampton and New York, and are much more economically feasible than the trans-pacific cruises. Headstrong, experienced travellers with a very loose timetable could attempt to cross the North Atlantic on fishing vessels - Greenland to Iceland is while in no way easy, possibly doable, and from Iceland there are regular ferries to the Faeroe Islands and Denmark on the European mainland with Smyril line[http://www.smyrilline.fo]. But how to cover the strait between Canada and Greenland is not immediately clear, it may be possible to hire experienced intuits to cross the strait on dog sleighs during the winter.
 
The '''Atlantic''' has similar difficulties, but Cunard Line's[http://www.cunard.com] proud historical ocean liners, still ply the route between Southampton and New York, and are much more economically feasible than the trans-pacific cruises. Headstrong, experienced travellers with a very loose timetable could attempt to cross the North Atlantic on fishing vessels - Greenland to Iceland is while in no way easy, possibly doable, and from Iceland there are regular ferries to the Faeroe Islands and Denmark on the European mainland with Smyril line[http://www.smyrilline.fo]. But how to cover the strait between Canada and Greenland is not immediately clear, it may be possible to hire experienced intuits to cross the strait on dog sleighs during the winter.
  
 
Perhaps surprisingly another obstacle is the '''[[Darien|Darién Gap]]''' a small 160 kilometre stretch of dense marshy jungle, made even more dangerous by guerrillas fighting in the area, between Panama and Columbia. Yes, this means there are no roads between Central and South America, there are no ferries covering the gap either, but backpacker traffic is so heavy that there is a fairly organised line of private vessels operating between [[Cartagena (Colombia)|Cartagena]] and the Portobelo Area or Carti in Panama. It is also feasible to walk along the Caribbean coast line, but unless you have experience in such journeys, this is not something you should take lightly.
 
Perhaps surprisingly another obstacle is the '''[[Darien|Darién Gap]]''' a small 160 kilometre stretch of dense marshy jungle, made even more dangerous by guerrillas fighting in the area, between Panama and Columbia. Yes, this means there are no roads between Central and South America, there are no ferries covering the gap either, but backpacker traffic is so heavy that there is a fairly organised line of private vessels operating between [[Cartagena (Colombia)|Cartagena]] and the Portobelo Area or Carti in Panama. It is also feasible to walk along the Caribbean coast line, but unless you have experience in such journeys, this is not something you should take lightly.

Revision as of 15:42, 23 April 2009

    This article is a travel topic

Traveling around the world has been a goal for many intrepid explorers ever since humans suspected that the world was round. Ancient Greek mathematicians calculated that the world was round and speculated on how to follow it all the way. The first person generally acknowledged to have pulled off this trip was Ferdinand Magellan.

These days, it is easy to buy a number of flights that take you around the world, but many people choose not to fly. One reason is that air travel is a polluting form of transport. Another is that the joy of traveling is the journey itself and the many places and experiences that come from passing through countries rather than flying over them.

Many people plan to travel around the world without using air transport by using a combination of sea, rail and road, although generally it is almost impossible not to include some air transport on the way, due to the cost of covering the oceans and for political reasons in some parts of the world.

There are a number of suggested itineraries, the most common are -

  • By train using the Silk Road via Kazakhstan to China and sailing on to America.
  • Taking a cabin on a cargo ship that can take you to a number of different ports.
  • Driving a car across land and shipping it at ports or selling it at the port.

Breaks

The Pacific ocean is by far the greatest obstacle to completing a circuit around the world overland; There are no ferries between neither Indonesia or New Zealand to Australia, nor are there any sort of regular service from Asia or Australia to the thousands of islands in Polynesia. Further north the Bering strait between Russia and Alaska doesn't have any scheduled traffic crossing it either. This means you either have to shell out more money than a plane ticket on the cruise ships that does cover this route - Japan to Alaska is the most economical option - or opt for the option more in the spirit of such a journey; Freighter travel. New Zealand, which maintains loose associations with a number of small islands in the pacific, sometimes offers for people to join on the semi regular freight routes, supplying these islands, but natives are always given priority, and securing a spot on these trips are not trivial, and requires much perseverance.

The Atlantic has similar difficulties, but Cunard Line's[1] proud historical ocean liners, still ply the route between Southampton and New York, and are much more economically feasible than the trans-pacific cruises. Headstrong, experienced travellers with a very loose timetable could attempt to cross the North Atlantic on fishing vessels - Greenland to Iceland is while in no way easy, possibly doable, and from Iceland there are regular ferries to the Faeroe Islands and Denmark on the European mainland with Smyril line[2]. But how to cover the strait between Canada and Greenland is not immediately clear, it may be possible to hire experienced intuits to cross the strait on dog sleighs during the winter.

Perhaps surprisingly another obstacle is the Darién Gap a small 160 kilometre stretch of dense marshy jungle, made even more dangerous by guerrillas fighting in the area, between Panama and Columbia. Yes, this means there are no roads between Central and South America, there are no ferries covering the gap either, but backpacker traffic is so heavy that there is a fairly organised line of private vessels operating between Cartagena and the Portobelo Area or Carti in Panama. It is also feasible to walk along the Caribbean coast line, but unless you have experience in such journeys, this is not something you should take lightly.