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North and Central Coast

Revision as of 07:40, 27 June 2018 by GiulioC (talk | contribs) (looks like touting)
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Earth : North America : Canada : British Columbia : North and Central Coast

The North and Central Coast is in a region in the western part of British Columbia, Canada. It stretches along the Pacific coast from the Alaska Panhandle in the north to the Queen Charlotte Strait in the south.

RegionsEdit

  • Haida Gwaii - an archipelago of more than 150 islands. Two of them are quite large. Previously called the "Queen Charlotte Islands", but officially changed in June 2010.

CitiesEdit

Other destinationsEdit

UnderstandEdit

The most developed part of this region is along the Yellowhead Highway. Once you venture to the Queen Charlotte Islands or south along the coast, you will find vast expanses of untouched wilderness and very few people. This is an area where first-growth rainforest meets rugged snowcapped peaks, framed by labrithyne ocean inlets that rival the fjords of Norway.

The climate is temperate near coastal regions, becoming colder as you travel east and north from the Pacific Ocean.

TalkEdit

The official language is English, though you will hear native dialects if you are in villages inhabited by the First Nations People.

Get inEdit

Prince Rupert has a small airport that serves domestic flights. By vehicle you can enter the region on the Yellowhead Highway (16) heading west from Prince George. The Cassiar Highway (37) is an alternative route from Alaska, and splits from the Alaska Highway in the Yukon just west of Watson Lake. It joins the Yellowhead in between Smithers and Terrace, passing Hyder.

Another way to enter the region is to take BC Ferries Inside Passage route from Port Hardy on Vancouver Island to Prince Rupert.

Get aroundEdit

You will want to travel by car to cover the vast distances. Vehicle rentals are available in Prince Rupert and Prince George. Via Rail also provides passenger rail service from Prince George to Prince Rupert, though this is more of an attraction in itself than a legitimate means of transportation.


SeeEdit

ItinerariesEdit

The Government of British Columbia outlines many circle tour itineraries. The Heritage Discovery [1] and Great Northern [2] tours have large parts in this region.

DoEdit

EatEdit

DrinkEdit

The popular place to drink at is the Sealaska Bar; folks get Hyderized there.

Stay safeEdit

Get outEdit

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