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*<see name="Otagi Nenbutsu-ji Temple" alt="愛宕念仏寺" address="2-5 Fukatani-cho" directions="By bus, take #72 from Kyoto station to Otagidera-Mae, or within Arashiyama, catch #62 or #72." phone="075-865-1231" url="" hours="Open from 8:00 AM to 5:00 PM" price="Admission is ¥300" lat="" long="">Despite being omitted from virtually all guidebooks, it's one of the true unknown gems of Kyoto. It was founded in the eighth century, and went through an unlucky patch for a millennium or so; by turns it was destroyed by flood, fire and typhoon, and had to move location a few times. Today, it sits a short distance from the end of Saga Toriimoto, one of Kyoto's three historic preservation districts. Two fierce statues guard the entrance. Once you're through the gate, though, you'll find over 1200 small (knee-to-waist high) statues, each with its own unique character - you'll see a cheerful boxer near the entrance, but you could spend hours checking out the rest, and you'll do it in relative seclusion, since this is well away from the tourist trail. The statues were carved in 1981 by amateurs under the direction of master sculptor Kocho Nishimura. Moss and forest have begun to reclaim the area, and if you've ever wondered what [[Angkor Wat]] would look like crossed with Japanese ''kawaii'', this is your chance.</see>
 
*<see name="Otagi Nenbutsu-ji Temple" alt="愛宕念仏寺" address="2-5 Fukatani-cho" directions="By bus, take #72 from Kyoto station to Otagidera-Mae, or within Arashiyama, catch #62 or #72." phone="075-865-1231" url="" hours="Open from 8:00 AM to 5:00 PM" price="Admission is ¥300" lat="" long="">Despite being omitted from virtually all guidebooks, it's one of the true unknown gems of Kyoto. It was founded in the eighth century, and went through an unlucky patch for a millennium or so; by turns it was destroyed by flood, fire and typhoon, and had to move location a few times. Today, it sits a short distance from the end of Saga Toriimoto, one of Kyoto's three historic preservation districts. Two fierce statues guard the entrance. Once you're through the gate, though, you'll find over 1200 small (knee-to-waist high) statues, each with its own unique character - you'll see a cheerful boxer near the entrance, but you could spend hours checking out the rest, and you'll do it in relative seclusion, since this is well away from the tourist trail. The statues were carved in 1981 by amateurs under the direction of master sculptor Kocho Nishimura. Moss and forest have begun to reclaim the area, and if you've ever wondered what [[Angkor Wat]] would look like crossed with Japanese ''kawaii'', this is your chance.</see>
  
* <see name="Daikakuji Temple" alt="" address="4 Saga-Osawa-cho" directions="" phone="" url="http://www.daikakuji.or.jp/english/index.html" hours="" price="Admission are ¥500 for Adults, ¥300 for Students. ¥200 for pond" lat="" long="">While it is a temple today, originally, it was the villa of Emperor Saga. It is well-known by those who practice ''Ikebana'', the Japanese art of flower arranging, as it is the birthplace of Saga Goryu, a school of Ikebana. Often, there are examples of Saga Goryu near the entrance to the temple. The temple itself is reasonably large, with some artwork inside. The view of the Osawanoike Pond is quite relaxing.</see>
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* <see name="Daikakuji Temple" alt="" address="4 Saga-Osawa-cho" directions="" phone="" url="http://www.daikakuji.or.jp/english/index.html" hours="" price="" lat="" long="">While it is a temple today, originally, it was the villa of Emperor Saga. It is well-known by those who practice ''Ikebana'', the Japanese art of flower arranging, as it is the birthplace of Saga Goryu, a school of Ikebana. Often, there are examples of Saga Goryu near the entrance to the temple. The temple itself is reasonably large, with some artwork inside. The view of the Osawanoike Pond is quite relaxing.</see>
  
 
* <see name="Adashino Nenbutsu-ji" alt="" address="" directions="" phone="075-861-2221" url="http://www.nenbutsuji.jp/" hours="Open 9 AM to 4:30 PM" price="" lat="" long="">The famous Priest Kukai established this temple for the purpose of saying prayers for Arashiyama's dead. The temple grounds are filled with approximately 8000 Buddhist statues, each representing an unknown or forgotten person. Although it is famous for its statues, just like Otagi Nenbutsu-ji, Adashino Nenbutsu-ji is a spiritual place and a graveyard, so it has greater historical and spiritual significance, as well as impressive and beautiful. If you take a walk through the small bamboo-lined path to the upper area, you'll find actual grave sites instead of the statues in the lower area. There is also an area similar to the purification spots found at most temples however, at this one, you are supposed to pour water on each of the statues as you walk around it. This is a form of reverence and worship, and the Japanese who enter (particularly those who come to the upper area) come to pray, so while it may be fun, try also to be respectful.</see>
 
* <see name="Adashino Nenbutsu-ji" alt="" address="" directions="" phone="075-861-2221" url="http://www.nenbutsuji.jp/" hours="Open 9 AM to 4:30 PM" price="" lat="" long="">The famous Priest Kukai established this temple for the purpose of saying prayers for Arashiyama's dead. The temple grounds are filled with approximately 8000 Buddhist statues, each representing an unknown or forgotten person. Although it is famous for its statues, just like Otagi Nenbutsu-ji, Adashino Nenbutsu-ji is a spiritual place and a graveyard, so it has greater historical and spiritual significance, as well as impressive and beautiful. If you take a walk through the small bamboo-lined path to the upper area, you'll find actual grave sites instead of the statues in the lower area. There is also an area similar to the purification spots found at most temples however, at this one, you are supposed to pour water on each of the statues as you walk around it. This is a form of reverence and worship, and the Japanese who enter (particularly those who come to the upper area) come to pray, so while it may be fun, try also to be respectful.</see>

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