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===By air===
 
===By air===
  
Khiva is about 40 km away from [[Urgench]] Airport (IATA: UGC). Uzbekistan Airways operates two or three daily flights from [[Tashkent]] (flying time round one hour). Flights (as Sep 2019) were about €50 one way.
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Khiva is about 40 km away from [[Urgench]] Airport (IATA: UGC). [Uzbekistan Airways] operates three daily flights from [[Tashkent]] (operated by RJ-85, AN-24 or YAK-40, flying time 1:30 hrs) and a flight on Saturday (operated by B-757, flying time 1:40 hr, return flight on Sundays). Flights (as July 2008) were about 105 000 sum for return ticket and about 75 000 sum (€ 39,-) for a single ticket.
  
You can also reach [[Urgench]] about five times a week on Ural Airlines via Domodedovo International Airport in [[Moscow]].    Uzbekistan Airways operates to Moscow (VKO) and St.Petersburg.
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You can also reach [[Urgench]] about five times a week on Ural Airlines via Domodedovo International Airport in [[Moscow]].  
  
Taxis from [[Urgench]] Airport to Khiva are about 60 000 sum (Aug'19) one way.
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Taxis from [[Urgench]] Airport to Khiva are about 7 000 sum one way.
  
 
===By train===
 
===By train===
  
Trains from [[Tashkent]] run daily and make the 16+ hour journey across the desert to [[Urgench]], with several stops ([[Samarkand]], Navoi etc.) along the way. Trains leave [[Tashkent]] in the evening and arrive in [[Urgench]] next day around noon. Trains in the opposite direction also run overnight. Depending on the class, you can get a 2-bunk ''coupy'' for 41 000 sum, a 4-bunk shared ''coupy'' for 25 000 sum, or you can rough it in ''plaskartnyy'' (hard-class) for the bargain price of 16 000 sum. The price for a place in a sleeping car is 50 000 UZS one way (2008). Taxis from [[Urgench]] Railway Station to Khiva are about 7 000 UZS one way. For the trolley bus see below.  
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Trains from [[Tashkent]] leave daily and make the 16+ hour journey across the desert to [[Urgench]], with several stops ([[Samarkand]], Navoi etc.) along the way. Trains leave [[Tashkent]] in the evening and arrive in [[Urgench]] next day. Depending on the class, you can get a 2-bunk ''coupy'' for 41 000 sum, a 4-bunk shared ''coupy'' for 25 000 sum, or you can rough it in ''plaskartnyy'' (hard-class) for the bargain price of 16 000 sum. The price for a place in a sleeping car is 50 000 UZS one way (2008). Taxis from [[Urgench]] Railway Station to Khiva are about 7 000 UZS one way. For the trolley bus see below. As Urgench is on a dead-end track not all long-distance trains go there but they do stop at "Tortkol" (sometimes spelled "Turtgul"), which is a 20 minutes taxi ride to Urgench. Train timetables in Russian and English (incl. prices [in Russian roubles] and on-line booking) are available online.[https://www.tutu.travel/poezda/]
 
 
As Urgench is on a dead-end track some trains do not go there but they do stop at "Tortkol" (sometimes spelled "Turtgul"), which is a 20 minutes taxi ride to Urgench, across Amu-Darya river. Urgench also has one direct sleeper train a week to [[Andijan]] in the Ferghana valley, via Tashkent. Both Urgench and Tortkol have direct trains to Saratov and Volgograd in Russia (via Kazakhstan).
 
 
 
Train timetables in English and Russian (incl. prices [in Russian roubles] and on-line booking) are available online.[https://www.tutu.travel/poezda/]
 
 
 
The new Khiva railway station has opened since June 2019. A train to Buchara leaves three times a week at 8.57 AM and costs 80.000 som per person. The trip takes 6 hours. You'll arrive at a station called Buchara, but it is actually 10 kilometers from Buchara. Skip the annoying taxi drivers outside the train station that ask far too much for the ride that they will tell you to be 15 kilometers. Instead take a (mini)bus, just 200 meter from the station near the road (1000 som per person).
 
 
 
There is a new train running most days: Khiva (dep 1428), stopping at Urgench (arr 1458), Bukhara (arr 2233), Samarkand (arr 0238) and Tashkent (0658).
 
  
 
===By bus===
 
===By bus===
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One you reach [[Urgench]], you can either negotiate for a local taxi to take you directly to [[Khiva]], which usually costs about 8000 sum for the entire car. A cheaper way is to negotiate a ride to the western side of the Urgench Bazaar (inner-city trips shouldn't cost you more than 1500 sum at the most). There you'll find the official Khiva taxi stand, which is a row of Daewoo Tico and Matiz brand vehicles all in a line. On average, it takes between 10-15 minutes for a car to fill up and the cost is about 1000 sum per person, flat.  
 
One you reach [[Urgench]], you can either negotiate for a local taxi to take you directly to [[Khiva]], which usually costs about 8000 sum for the entire car. A cheaper way is to negotiate a ride to the western side of the Urgench Bazaar (inner-city trips shouldn't cost you more than 1500 sum at the most). There you'll find the official Khiva taxi stand, which is a row of Daewoo Tico and Matiz brand vehicles all in a line. On average, it takes between 10-15 minutes for a car to fill up and the cost is about 1000 sum per person, flat.  
  
'''Trolleybus''': An interesting (and cheap) way to get to Khiva from Urgench is via the trolleybus, which you can pick up near the Urgench Bazaar. At 1200 sum [Jan 2018], it's a bargain and it allows you to see the countryside between Urgench and Khiva at a snail's pace. It will also drop you off right in front of the northern gate of the Ichon-Kala with the rest of the taxicabs. Trolleybusses leave Urgench every 30 minutes during daytime and the journey takes about 60 minutes.
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'''Trolleybus''': An interesting (and cheap) way to get to Khiva from Urgench is via the trolleybus, which you can pick up near the Urgench Bazaar. At 700 sum [Sep 2012], it's a bargain and it allows you to see the countryside between Urgench and Khiva at a snail's pace. It will also drop you off right in front of the northern gate of the Ichon-Kala with the rest of the taxicabs. Trolleybusses leave Urgench every 30 minutes during daytime and the journey takes about 60 minutes.
  
 
Khiva is about 1390 km from [[Andizhan]], 470 km from [[Bukhara]], 1370 km from [[Fergana]], 630 km from [[Karshi]], 740 km from [[Samarkand]], 1270 km from [[Kokand]], 200 km from [[Nukus]], 750 km from [[Shakhrisabz]], 1020 km from [[Tashkent]] and 850 km from [[Termez]].
 
Khiva is about 1390 km from [[Andizhan]], 470 km from [[Bukhara]], 1370 km from [[Fergana]], 630 km from [[Karshi]], 740 km from [[Samarkand]], 1270 km from [[Kokand]], 200 km from [[Nukus]], 750 km from [[Shakhrisabz]], 1020 km from [[Tashkent]] and 850 km from [[Termez]].
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===Ichon-Qala (Itchan Kala)===
 
===Ichon-Qala (Itchan Kala)===
  
The old town Ichon-Qala (Itchan Kala) covers an area of about 26 hectares. It is rectangular in plan. The tourist office inside the West Gate will most likely ask you to buy a 2-day ticket that covers entry for all of the museums and buildings inside the city (excluding the Islom-Khoja minaret and a few madrassas).  As of September 2019, there are three prices, 150,000 VIP (all access), 100,000 (Standard) and 50,000 (basic) with varying number of sites included. Child and student prices are 50%. Unfortunately there is no map or checklist showing what is or isn't included, and many sites are well hidden. Tickets are valid for 48 hours, so you can split your sightseeing up across up to 3 days.  You can enter each site more than once on the same ticket.
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The old town Ichon-Qala (Itchan Kala) covers an area of about 26 hectares. It is rectangular in plan.The tourist office inside the West Gate will most likely ask you to buy a ticket that covers entry for all of the museums and buildings inside the city (excluding the Islom-Khoja minaret and a few madrassas) for about 28,000 sums, with possibly an additional 7,000 sums charged for photography (Sep 14). If you don't plan to enter any of the buildings (where tickets are checked) and just want to walk inside the old town and eat there, you can avoid paying the ticket by entering through a different gate.  
 
 
If you don't plan to enter any of the buildings (where tickets are checked) and just want to walk inside the old town and eat there, you can avoid paying the ticket by entering through a different gate.  
 
  
 
Itchan Kala was the site of the khan's palace. High officials and clergy and rich merchants used to live here. This is why we find the most important buildings in the Itchan Kala. The ordinary people, small merchants, craftsmen and peasants lived in Dishan Kala. There were wells in Itchan Kala, whereas people had to draw drinking water from the irrigation channels in Dishan Kala. In the north western part of Itchan Kala is the well, where according to the legend the city was founded by Sem.
 
Itchan Kala was the site of the khan's palace. High officials and clergy and rich merchants used to live here. This is why we find the most important buildings in the Itchan Kala. The ordinary people, small merchants, craftsmen and peasants lived in Dishan Kala. There were wells in Itchan Kala, whereas people had to draw drinking water from the irrigation channels in Dishan Kala. In the north western part of Itchan Kala is the well, where according to the legend the city was founded by Sem.
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[[Image:Uzbekistan_2011_350.JPG|thumb|240px|Wooden coloumn inside Juma Mosque]]
 
[[Image:Uzbekistan_2011_350.JPG|thumb|240px|Wooden coloumn inside Juma Mosque]]
  
* <see name="Juma Mosque" alt="" address="" directions="" phone="" url="" hours="" price="" lat="" long="" email="" fax="">The old mosque was already mentioned by the Arab traveller Mohammed al-Magisi in the 10th cent. According to the inscriptions above the entrance the actual mosque was built in the 18th cent. It covers an area of 55 x 46 m. The interior is square in plan. It has two octogonal openings in the ceiling. Apart from wooden beams and columns it has no decoration. It contains 212 ornately carved columns that support the roof, dating back to the 12th to 15th century. The wooden columns were removed from other buildings which have been destroyed. The columns are masterpieces of wood carving. The whole surface is covered by leaves, flowers and tendrils. If you watch cloisels you can see pomegrenates blossoms and acanthus leaves. The columns are peculiar in form: they are spherical at their base, get a little bit narrower and end with a part similar to an oblong drinking glass. In some columns the base is a square marble or a round piece of wood only. Similar carved columns were not only used in palaces and mosques, but also in farmers' houses where they carry the roof of the verandah. It is reported that these wooden columns are the oldest in Central Asia. Tradition says that they come from the Great Mosque of Kat, the former capital of old Choresmia. Research has proved that 15 of the deta to the 10th to 14th cent. Be sure to bring some sort of light if you plan to climb the 81 steps up to the top of the Juma minaret, which you can access from inside. </see>
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* <see name="Juma Mosque" alt="" address="" directions="" phone="" url="" hours="" price="" lat="" long="" email="" fax="">The old mosque was already mentioned by the Arab traveller Mohammed al-Magisi in the 10th cent. According to the inscriptions above the entrance the actual mosque was built in the 18th cent. It covers an area of 55 x 46 m. The interior is square in plan. It has two octogonal openings in the ceiling. Apart from wooden beams and columns it has no decoration. It contains 212 ornately carved columns that support the roof, dating back to the 12th to 15th century. The wooden columns were removed from other buildings which have been destroyed. The columns are masterpieces of wood carving. The whole surface is covered by leaves, flowers and tendrils. If you watch cloisels you can see pomegrenates blossoms and acanthus leaves. The columns are peculiar in form: they are spherical at their base, get a little bit narrower and end with a part similar to an oblong drinking glass. In some columns the base is a square marble or a round piece of wood only. Similar carved columns were not only used in palaces and mosques, but also in farmers' houses where they carry the roof of the verandah. It is reported that these wooden columns are the oldest in Central Asia. Tradition says that they come from the Great Mosque of Kat, the former capital of old Choresmia. Research has proved that 15 of the deta to the 10th to 14th cent. Be sure to bring some sort of light if you plan to climb the 81 steps up to the top of the Juma minaret, which you can access from inside. Even if you buy the all-access 10000 sum pass, you'll have to pay an extra fee if you want to enter this mosque.</see>
  
* <see name="Pahlawan Mahmud Mausoleum" alt="" address="" directions="south of Juma Mosque" phone="" url="" hours="" price="10000 som" lat="" long="" email="" fax="">The mausoleum is one of the most popular places of pilgrimage in Uzbekistan. ''Pahlawan Mahmud ("the strong man")'' was famous for his extraordinary bravery, physical strength as well as his good nature. He was a furrier, but also a wrestler, doctor, poet and saint. The people gave him the title "Pahlavan", meaning brave and handsome hero, as he defended the poor and is said to have had mystical powers. Pahlavan Mahmud is also revered in Persia and India. His grave became an important shrine for pilgrims and became the burial place of the Khans of Khiva. Tradition says that the firts building was erected over Pahlavan Mahmud furrier's shop. The present building was erected in the 18th cent. It covers an area 100 x 50 m wide, on which the saint's grave, prayer rooms, a pilgrims' lodge, a summer and a winter mosque have been built. According to an inscription the building was erected by architect ''Abdullah Djin''. It is considered as one of the most important buildings of Islamic Central Asia due to its interior totally covered with glazed tiles and due to its artfully facade. In the 19th cent. the mausoleum became a necopolis of the princes of the Kungrat dynasty. It is considered as the last great mausoleum building in Central Asia. The ''southern entrance'' is the oldest part of the present building. It has an inscription on the wooden door indicating the date 1701. The mausoleum has an oval turquoise dome with white ornaments on the lower edges. Within the mausoleum are the richly decorated sarcophagus of ''Khan Mohammed Rahim'' and two sarcophagi of black marble of the historian ''Khan Abu Al Gazi'' who died in 1663 and of ''Khan Anush'' who died in 1681. Beside the prayer room is the crypt with the grave of Pahlavan Mahmud. The walls are covered with ornaments all over, depicting interlacing stalks of flowers, leaves and zig-zag or crossing lines. The wooden door with ivory work, the wooden columns and the glazed tiles make Pahlawan Mahmud Mausoleum to the best museum of applied arts in Khiva. Note: Not part of 2-day ticket, additional fee applies (July 2018).</see>
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* <see name="Pahlawan Mahmud Mausoleum" alt="" address="" directions="south of Juma Mosque" phone="" url="" hours="" price="" lat="" long="" email="" fax="">The mausoleum is one of the most popular places of pilgrimage in Uzbekistan. ''Pahlawan Mahmud ("the strong man")'' was famous for his extraordinary bravery, physical strength as well as his good nature. He was a furrier, but also a wrestler, doctor, poet and saint. The people gave him the title "Pahlavan", meaning brave and handsome hero, as he defended the poor and is said to have had mystical powers. Pahlavan Mahmud is also revered in Persia and India. His grave became an important shrine for pilgrims and became the burial place of the Khans of Khiva. Tradition says that the firts building was erected over Pahlavan Mahmud furrier's shop. The present building was erected in the 18th cent. It covers an area 100 x 50 m wide, on which the saint's grave, prayer rooms, a pilgrims' lodge, a summer and a winter mosque have been built. According to an inscription the building was erected by architect ''Abdullah Djin''. It is considered as one of the most important buildings of Islamic Central Asia due to its interior totally covered with glazed tiles and due to its artfully facade. In the 19th cent. the mausoleum became a necopolis of the princes of the Kungrat dynasty. It is considered as the last great mausoleum building in Central Asia. The ''southern entrance'' is the oldest part of the present building. It has an inscription on the wooden door indicating the date 1701. The mausoleum has an oval turquoise dome with white ornaments on the lower edges. Within the mausoleum are the richly decorated sarcophagus of ''Khan Mohammed Rahim'' and two sarcophagi of black marble of the historian ''Khan Abu Al Gazi'' who died in 1663 and of ''Khan Anush'' who died in 1681. Beside the prayer room is the crypt with the grave of Pahlavan Mahmud. The walls are covered with ornaments all over, depicting interlacing stalks of flowers, leaves and zig-zag or crossing lines. The wooden door with ivory work, the wooden columns and the glazed tiles make Pahlawan Mahmud Mausoleum to the best museum of applied arts in Khiva.</see>
 
 
*<see name="Islam Khoja Minaret" alt="" address="" directions="" phone="" url="" hours="" price="10000 som" lat="" long="">The minaret is 45 m high and 10 m wide atb its base. It was built in 1908, however using the same methods as the much older minarets at Bukhara, Wabkent and Konye Urgench. You can see the minaret from every place in Khiva and even from far away in the desert. It is probable that the minaret served military purposes as well. ''Islam Khoja'' was great vizier of Khan Asfendijar. He undertook moderate reforms, opened the first secular school and the first hospital and introduced mail and railways. ''Khan Asfendijar'' ruled from 1910 to 1920. He mistrusted everyone. He stayed in a mirror hall, observed all persons arriving through the mirrors and called the palace guards on the most trifling occasions. But to the greatest extent he feared his own vizier. Thus, he ordered that nobody was allowed to leave his house in order to pray for the health and the spiritual welfare of the khan. He called for Islam Khoja, kept him in his palace until dark and on his way home Islam Khoja was killed by bandits.</see>
 
  
 +
*<see name="Islam Khoja Minaret" alt="" address="" directions="" phone="" url="" hours="" price="3000uzs" lat="" long="">The minaret is 45 m high and 10 m wide atb its base. It was built in 1908, however using the same methods as the much older minarets at Bukhara, Wabkent and Konye Urgench. You can see the minaret from every place in Khiva and even from far away in the desert. It is probable that the minaret served military purposes as well. ''Islam Khoja'' was great vizier of Khan Asfendijar. He undertook moderate reforms, opened the first secular school and the first hospital and introduced mail and railways. ''Khan Asfendijar'' ruled from 1910 to 1920. He mistrusted everyone. He stayed in a mirror hall, observed all persons arriving through the mirrors and called the palace guards on the most trifling occasions. But to the greatest extent he feared his own vizier. Thus, he ordered that nobody was allowed to leave his house in order to pray for the health and the spiritual welfare of the khan. He called for Islam Khoja, kept him in his palace until dark and on his way home Islam Khoja was killed by bandits.  </see>
 
*<see name="Shirgiz Khan Medressa" alt="" address="" directions="in the center of Ichan-Kala, near Pahlawan Mahmud Mausoleum" phone="" url="" hours="" price="" lat="" long="">This is the oldest Quran school in Khiva. It was bilit in 1718/19. Tradition says that it was constructed by slaves captured by Shigaziz Khan during his expedition to Meshed from which he returned with five thousand slaves. He promised them to be released when the medressa was completed, but he delayed the completion again and again, asking new services from the hungry slaves again and again. In 1726 the slaves killed him in the unfinished medressa.</see>
 
*<see name="Shirgiz Khan Medressa" alt="" address="" directions="in the center of Ichan-Kala, near Pahlawan Mahmud Mausoleum" phone="" url="" hours="" price="" lat="" long="">This is the oldest Quran school in Khiva. It was bilit in 1718/19. Tradition says that it was constructed by slaves captured by Shigaziz Khan during his expedition to Meshed from which he returned with five thousand slaves. He promised them to be released when the medressa was completed, but he delayed the completion again and again, asking new services from the hungry slaves again and again. In 1726 the slaves killed him in the unfinished medressa.</see>
 
*<see name="Medressa Muhammed Amin Khan" alt="" address="" directions="opposite Kunja Ark" phone="" url="" hours="" price="" lat="" long="">This medressa is the largest in Khiva. Its facade is made of coloured brick and mosaics. The main characteristics of the buliding are the ''hujiras'' (students' cells). Khan Muhammed Alim was one of the most important khans of Khiva. The medressa was built in 1851/52 and the khan died 1855 in a battle against the Turkmen. The Hungarian traveller Vambery reported that the medressa had 250 pupils. </see>
 
*<see name="Medressa Muhammed Amin Khan" alt="" address="" directions="opposite Kunja Ark" phone="" url="" hours="" price="" lat="" long="">This medressa is the largest in Khiva. Its facade is made of coloured brick and mosaics. The main characteristics of the buliding are the ''hujiras'' (students' cells). Khan Muhammed Alim was one of the most important khans of Khiva. The medressa was built in 1851/52 and the khan died 1855 in a battle against the Turkmen. The Hungarian traveller Vambery reported that the medressa had 250 pupils. </see>
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==Do==
 
==Do==
 
*<do name="Fashion and Traditional Dance Show" alt="" address="in the Alloquli Khan Medressa" directions="" phone="" url="" hours="" price="" lat="" long="">in the high season at dusk, one show 5000S, both shows 7000S, with dinner 10000S (2007)</do>
 
*<do name="Fashion and Traditional Dance Show" alt="" address="in the Alloquli Khan Medressa" directions="" phone="" url="" hours="" price="" lat="" long="">in the high season at dusk, one show 5000S, both shows 7000S, with dinner 10000S (2007)</do>
*'''Khiva Puppet Theater''' - watch a puppet show, a cultural heritage of Uzbekistan. Located inside the Itchan Kala. Address: 12, Mustakillik str., Khiva.  Telephone: (8362) 375-37-64. Price: $5-6.
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==Buy==
 
==Buy==
  
 
There are many souvenir vendors in Khiva and they all will want to sell something to you, trying to attract your attention with some knowledge of English. Souvenirs might be more expensive than in Samarkand and Bukhara, but you can bargain quite a lot and get some very good deals.  
 
There are many souvenir vendors in Khiva and they all will want to sell something to you, trying to attract your attention with some knowledge of English. Souvenirs might be more expensive than in Samarkand and Bukhara, but you can bargain quite a lot and get some very good deals.  
 
There is a working ATM just inside the West Gate (as of Sept 2019) that accepts Mastercard. Inside the Asia Hotel there is supposedly a working ATM for Visa cards.
 
  
 
A good place to buy is the UNESCO-sponsored silk workshop in Qqozi Kalon Medressa. It sells unique silk handcrafts. Although they might be more expensive than in other places, you support the workers there directly:
 
A good place to buy is the UNESCO-sponsored silk workshop in Qqozi Kalon Medressa. It sells unique silk handcrafts. Although they might be more expensive than in other places, you support the workers there directly:
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==Eat==
 
==Eat==
 
Many of the city restaurants prioritise groups, so you may find that the good restaurants at meal times are full, with independent travellers low on the list of priorities.  Some places explain this politely, some say "no, full" and turn their back on you. 
 
 
Outside the main wall there is a supermarket, and plenty of cheaper, less touristy restaurants.
 
  
 
*<eat name="Zerafshan Chaikhana" alt="" address="Islom Hoja" directions="in the old Tolib Maksum Medressa, near Islam Hojar minaret, serving specialities from Khorezm" phone="3757051" url="" hours="" price="1 500 UZS" lat="" long=""></eat>
 
*<eat name="Zerafshan Chaikhana" alt="" address="Islom Hoja" directions="in the old Tolib Maksum Medressa, near Islam Hojar minaret, serving specialities from Khorezm" phone="3757051" url="" hours="" price="1 500 UZS" lat="" long=""></eat>
 
*<eat name="Bir Gumbaz" alt="" address="Pahlavon Mahmud" directions="in an old mosque in the old quarter Ichon-Qala" phone="3753026" url="" hours="" price="2 000 UZS" lat="" long="">fine view of the Kalta Minor</eat>
 
*<eat name="Bir Gumbaz" alt="" address="Pahlavon Mahmud" directions="in an old mosque in the old quarter Ichon-Qala" phone="3753026" url="" hours="" price="2 000 UZS" lat="" long="">fine view of the Kalta Minor</eat>
 +
*<eat name="Farrukh" alt="" address="Pahlavon Mahmud" directions="in the old quarter Ichon-Qala" phone="" url="" hours="" price="2 000 UZS" lat="" long="">with a decorated yurt, nice atmosphere, </eat>
 
*<eat name="Parvoz" alt="" address="Mustaqilik 5" directions="outside the old town, in Dishon-Qala" phone="" url="" hours="" price="1 000 UZS" lat="" long=""></eat>
 
*<eat name="Parvoz" alt="" address="Mustaqilik 5" directions="outside the old town, in Dishon-Qala" phone="" url="" hours="" price="1 000 UZS" lat="" long=""></eat>
 
*<eat name="Khorezm Art Restaurant" alt="" address="Medrese Allakulikhan" directions="" phone="3752455" url="" hours="" price="[Sep 2012], salads at 2000uzs, soups 6000uzs, mains from 8000uzs" lat="" long="">Common project of German Embassy in Tashkent, Deutscher Volkshochschulverband, Deutscher Entwicklungsdienst and Khiva Center for Development of Business and Tourism.</eat>
 
*<eat name="Khorezm Art Restaurant" alt="" address="Medrese Allakulikhan" directions="" phone="3752455" url="" hours="" price="[Sep 2012], salads at 2000uzs, soups 6000uzs, mains from 8000uzs" lat="" long="">Common project of German Embassy in Tashkent, Deutscher Volkshochschulverband, Deutscher Entwicklungsdienst and Khiva Center for Development of Business and Tourism.</eat>
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Take the usual precautions when drinking from local water sources, but make sure to stay hydrated, especially in the summer. The heat bouncing off the mud walls can make Khiva feel like a broiler sometimes, and you can easily run the risk of heat exhaustion.
 
Take the usual precautions when drinking from local water sources, but make sure to stay hydrated, especially in the summer. The heat bouncing off the mud walls can make Khiva feel like a broiler sometimes, and you can easily run the risk of heat exhaustion.
  
Some hotels might be desperate for people to stay at their hotel an extra night, offering day trips all the way to Moynaq for the dried up Aral Sea, the Mizdakhan necropolis and the art museum in Nukus, saying their price is the same as what you would pay from Nukus to Moynaq (which isn't true, as long as you can haggle). Don't let them pressure you into it because there's no way to fit all that in one day.
 
  
 
==Contact==
 
==Contact==
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==Get out==
 
==Get out==
Most hotels have a driver for daytrips to the desert castles of Khorezm, for roughly $30 a car (as of 2018). The castles that are visited are [[Ayaz-Kala]], [[Toprak-Kala]] and one other. However there are other interesting castles, or *kalas*, to visit - such as Big Guldursun Kala, Kirk Kiz Kala, etc. Because of how many ruins of these castles are around, be sure to confirm and show an online picture of the kala you want to visit so they don't just take you to some random one and say that's the one you want to see.
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===By air===
 
===By air===
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===By train===
 
===By train===
 
Note: The new Khiva railway station is operational as of June 2019.
 
  
 
Trains to [[Tashkent]] leave twice a week and make the 19 hour journey across the desert, with one major stop along the way in [[Samarkand]]. Trains leave [[Urgench]] on Mon, Wed and Sun at 6.15pm and arrive in [[Tashkent]]  at 1.45pm next day. Depending on the class, you can get a 2-bunk ''coupy'' for 41000 sum, a 4-bunk shared ''coupy'' for 25000 sum, or you can rough it in ''plaskartnyy'' (hard-class) for the bargain price of 16000 sum. The price for a place in a sleeping car is 50.000 UZS one way (2008). Taxis from [Urgench] Railway Station to Khiva are about 7000 UZS one way. For the Trolley Bus see below.
 
Trains to [[Tashkent]] leave twice a week and make the 19 hour journey across the desert, with one major stop along the way in [[Samarkand]]. Trains leave [[Urgench]] on Mon, Wed and Sun at 6.15pm and arrive in [[Tashkent]]  at 1.45pm next day. Depending on the class, you can get a 2-bunk ''coupy'' for 41000 sum, a 4-bunk shared ''coupy'' for 25000 sum, or you can rough it in ''plaskartnyy'' (hard-class) for the bargain price of 16000 sum. The price for a place in a sleeping car is 50.000 UZS one way (2008). Taxis from [Urgench] Railway Station to Khiva are about 7000 UZS one way. For the Trolley Bus see below.

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