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* <see name="Kalta Minor" alt="" address="" directions="next to the Orient Star Hotel" phone="" url="" hours="" price="" lat="" long="" email="" fax="">This squat minaret is an iconic symbol of Khiva, mainly because of it's exquisite blue and green tile work and the fact that it remains unfinished. It was originally supposed to rival the Kalon Minaret in Bukhara, however the architect fled before seeing it finished, fearing he would be put to death by the khan. Technically, you aren't allow to climb to the top of this minaret, but guards have been known to give visitors "unofficial" tours of the interior structure, for a fee. Kalta Minor dates from the 19th cent. Apparently it has never been completed. It is 14 m in diamater at its base and 26 m high. According to the legend ''Amir Khan'' intended to build a a minaret from the top of which he could see to Buchara, 400 km away. After his death in 1855 the construction works came to a halt. The varied pattern of coloured glazed tiles in white, blue, green and a brownishes yellow form a perfect harmony.</see>
 
* <see name="Kalta Minor" alt="" address="" directions="next to the Orient Star Hotel" phone="" url="" hours="" price="" lat="" long="" email="" fax="">This squat minaret is an iconic symbol of Khiva, mainly because of it's exquisite blue and green tile work and the fact that it remains unfinished. It was originally supposed to rival the Kalon Minaret in Bukhara, however the architect fled before seeing it finished, fearing he would be put to death by the khan. Technically, you aren't allow to climb to the top of this minaret, but guards have been known to give visitors "unofficial" tours of the interior structure, for a fee. Kalta Minor dates from the 19th cent. Apparently it has never been completed. It is 14 m in diamater at its base and 26 m high. According to the legend ''Amir Khan'' intended to build a a minaret from the top of which he could see to Buchara, 400 km away. After his death in 1855 the construction works came to a halt. The varied pattern of coloured glazed tiles in white, blue, green and a brownishes yellow form a perfect harmony.</see>
 
[[Image:Uzbekistan_2011_350.JPG|thumb|240px|Wooden coloumn inside Juma Mosque]]
 
  
 
* <see name="Juma Mosque" alt="" address="" directions="" phone="" url="" hours="" price="" lat="" long="" email="" fax="">The old mosque was already mentioned by the Arab traveller Mohammed al-Magisi in the 10th cent. According to the inscriptions above the entrance the actual mosque was built in the 18th cent. It covers an area of 55 x 46 m. The interior is square in plan. It has two octogonal openings in the ceiling. Apart from wooden beams and columns it has no decoration. It contains 212 ornately carved columns that support the roof, dating back to the 12th to 15th century. The wooden columns were removed from other buildings which have been destroyed. The columns are masterpieces of wood carving. The whole surface is covered by leaves, flowers and tendrils. If you watch cloisels you can see pomegrenates blossoms and acanthus leaves. The columns are peculiar in form: they are spherical at their base, get a little bit narrower and end with a part similar to an oblong drinking glass. In some columns the base is a square marble or a round piece of wood only. Similar carved columns were not only used in palaces and mosques, but also in farmers' houses where they carry the roof of the verandah. It is reported that these wooden columns are the oldest in Central Asia. Tradition says that they come from the Great Mosque of Kat, the former capital of old Choresmia. Research has proved that 15 of the deta to the 10th to 14th cent. Be sure to bring some sort of light if you plan to climb the 81 steps up to the top of the Juma minaret, which you can access from inside. Even if you buy the all-access 10000 sum pass, you'll have to pay an extra fee if you want to enter this mosque.</see>
 
* <see name="Juma Mosque" alt="" address="" directions="" phone="" url="" hours="" price="" lat="" long="" email="" fax="">The old mosque was already mentioned by the Arab traveller Mohammed al-Magisi in the 10th cent. According to the inscriptions above the entrance the actual mosque was built in the 18th cent. It covers an area of 55 x 46 m. The interior is square in plan. It has two octogonal openings in the ceiling. Apart from wooden beams and columns it has no decoration. It contains 212 ornately carved columns that support the roof, dating back to the 12th to 15th century. The wooden columns were removed from other buildings which have been destroyed. The columns are masterpieces of wood carving. The whole surface is covered by leaves, flowers and tendrils. If you watch cloisels you can see pomegrenates blossoms and acanthus leaves. The columns are peculiar in form: they are spherical at their base, get a little bit narrower and end with a part similar to an oblong drinking glass. In some columns the base is a square marble or a round piece of wood only. Similar carved columns were not only used in palaces and mosques, but also in farmers' houses where they carry the roof of the verandah. It is reported that these wooden columns are the oldest in Central Asia. Tradition says that they come from the Great Mosque of Kat, the former capital of old Choresmia. Research has proved that 15 of the deta to the 10th to 14th cent. Be sure to bring some sort of light if you plan to climb the 81 steps up to the top of the Juma minaret, which you can access from inside. Even if you buy the all-access 10000 sum pass, you'll have to pay an extra fee if you want to enter this mosque.</see>

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