YOU CAN EDIT THIS PAGE! Just click any blue "Edit" link and start writing!

Editing Italy

Jump to: navigation, search

Warning: You are not logged in. Your IP address will be publicly visible if you make any edits. If you log in or create an account, your edits will be attributed to your username, along with other benefits.

The edit can be undone. Please check the comparison below to verify that this is what you want to do, and then save the changes below to finish undoing the edit.
Latest revision Your text
Line 1: Line 1:
 
{{pagebanner|Italy banner.jpg}}
 
{{pagebanner|Italy banner.jpg}}
 +
 +
__TOC__
 +
[http://www.italia.it/en/home.html '''Italy'''] ([[Italian phrasebook|Italian]]: ''Italia'') is a country in Southern Europe. Together with [[Greece]], it is acknowledged as the birthplace of Western culture. Not surprisingly, it is also home to the greatest number of [[UNESCO World Heritage List|UNESCO World Heritage Sites]] in the world. High art and monuments are to be found everywhere around the country.
 +
 +
It is also famous worldwide for its delicious cuisine, its trendy fashion industry, luxury sports cars and motorcycles, diverse regional cultures and dialects, as well as for its beautiful coast, alpine lakes and mountain ranges (the Alps and Apennines). No wonder it is often nicknamed the ''Bel Paese'' (the Beautiful Country).
  
 
{{quickbar
 
{{quickbar
| image=Sant'Angelo bridge, dusk, Rome, Italy.jpg
+
| image=Rome at night.jpg
 
| caption=Rome
 
| caption=Rome
 
| location=Italy in its region.svg
 
| location=Italy in its region.svg
Line 10: Line 15:
 
| currency=Euro (€)
 
| currency=Euro (€)
 
| area=total: 301,340km²<br />''water:'' 7,200km²<br />''land:'' 294,140km²
 
| area=total: 301,340km²<br />''water:'' 7,200km²<br />''land:'' 294,140km²
| population=60,483,973 (2017 census)
+
| population=59,433,744 (2011 census)
 
| language=[[Italian]] (official); minor [[German]], [[French]] and [[Slovenian phrasebook|Slovene]]-speaking communities
 
| language=[[Italian]] (official); minor [[German]], [[French]] and [[Slovenian phrasebook|Slovene]]-speaking communities
| religion=74.4% Catholic Church, 22.6% Irreligious, 3.0% others
+
| religion=predominately Roman Catholic with mature Protestant and Jewish communities and a growing Muslim immigrant community
 
| callingcode=+39
 
| callingcode=+39
 
| tld=.it
 
| tld=.it
Line 19: Line 24:
 
| emergencies=dial '''112'''
 
| emergencies=dial '''112'''
 
}}
 
}}
 
[http://www.italia.it/en/home.html '''Italy'''] ([[Italian phrasebook|Italian]]: ''Italia'') is a country in Southern Europe. Together with [[Greece]], it is acknowledged as the birthplace of Western culture. Not surprisingly, it is also home to the greatest number of [[UNESCO World Heritage List|UNESCO World Heritage Sites]] in the world. High art and monuments are to be found everywhere around the country.
 
 
It is also famous worldwide for its delicious cuisine, its trendy fashion industry, luxury sports cars and motorcycles, diverse regional cultures and dialects, as well as for its beautiful coast, alpine lakes and mountain ranges (the Alps and Apennines). No wonder it is often nicknamed the ''Bel Paese'' (the Beautiful Country).
 
  
 
Two independent mini-states are surrounded entirely by Italy: [[San Marino]] and [[Rome/Vatican|Vatican City]]. While technically not part of the European Union, both of these states are also part of the Schengen Area and the European Monetary Union (EMU). Apart from different police uniforms, there is no evident transition from these states and Italy's territory, and the currency is the same. Italian is also the official language in both countries.
 
Two independent mini-states are surrounded entirely by Italy: [[San Marino]] and [[Rome/Vatican|Vatican City]]. While technically not part of the European Union, both of these states are also part of the Schengen Area and the European Monetary Union (EMU). Apart from different police uniforms, there is no evident transition from these states and Italy's territory, and the currency is the same. Italian is also the official language in both countries.
Line 32: Line 33:
  
 
===History===
 
===History===
[[File:Pantheon panorama, Rome - 4.jpg|thumb|250px|The Pantheon, a huge Roman temple, which is a symbol of the Roman civilization in Italy.]]
+
[[File:Rom Pantheon mit Obelisk.jpg|thumb|250px|The Pantheon, a huge Roman temple, which is a symbol of the Roman civilization in Italy.]]
 
Certainly, humans inhabited the Italian peninsula for at least 200,000 years; Neolithic civilisations flourished in prehistoric Italy but were either wiped out, or assimilated, around 2000&nbsp;BC by a group of Indo-European tribes, which are collectively known as the Italic peoples.  
 
Certainly, humans inhabited the Italian peninsula for at least 200,000 years; Neolithic civilisations flourished in prehistoric Italy but were either wiped out, or assimilated, around 2000&nbsp;BC by a group of Indo-European tribes, which are collectively known as the Italic peoples.  
 
These were more or less closely related to each other and comprised tribes such as the Latins, Etruscans, Umbrians, Samnites, Sicels, Ligures, Oscans, just to name a few. The Etruscan civilisation was among the first to rise in the 6th century BC and lasted until the late Republican period; it flourished in what are now northern [[Lazio]], [[Umbria]] and [[Tuscany]].
 
These were more or less closely related to each other and comprised tribes such as the Latins, Etruscans, Umbrians, Samnites, Sicels, Ligures, Oscans, just to name a few. The Etruscan civilisation was among the first to rise in the 6th century BC and lasted until the late Republican period; it flourished in what are now northern [[Lazio]], [[Umbria]] and [[Tuscany]].
Line 84: Line 85:
 
In 1946, King Umberto II was forced to abdicate and Italy became a republic. In the 1950s, Italy became a member of NATO and allied itself with the United States. The Marshall Plan helped revive the Italian economy which, until the 1960s, enjoyed a period of sustained economic growth. In 1957, Italy became a founding member of the European Economic Community. In the 1950s and early-1960s, Italy experienced a period of rapid economic growth and industrial production, called "il boom", which saw the country's rise from a poor and weak nation, to a powerful one. During this period, also, cities such as Rome returned to being popular tourist destinations, expressed in both American and Italian films such as ''Roman Holiday'' and ''La Dolce Vita''.
 
In 1946, King Umberto II was forced to abdicate and Italy became a republic. In the 1950s, Italy became a member of NATO and allied itself with the United States. The Marshall Plan helped revive the Italian economy which, until the 1960s, enjoyed a period of sustained economic growth. In 1957, Italy became a founding member of the European Economic Community. In the 1950s and early-1960s, Italy experienced a period of rapid economic growth and industrial production, called "il boom", which saw the country's rise from a poor and weak nation, to a powerful one. During this period, also, cities such as Rome returned to being popular tourist destinations, expressed in both American and Italian films such as ''Roman Holiday'' and ''La Dolce Vita''.
  
[[File:Trevi-Brunnen abends.jpg|thumb|The Trevi Fountain, symbol of 18th century Baroque Italy.]]
+
[[Image:Trevi Fountain at Night.jpg|thumb|The Trevi Fountain, symbol of 18th century Baroque Italy.]]
 
However, despite a productive and successful period which lasted until the mid-early 1960s, from the late 60s till the late 1980s, the country experienced an economic crisis. There was a constant fear, both inside and outside Italy (particularly in the USA), that the Communist Party, which regularly polled over 20% of the vote, would one day form a government and all sorts of dirty tricks were concocted to prevent this. From 1992 to the present day, Italy has faced massive government debt and extensive corruption. Scandals have involved all major parties, but especially the Christian Democrats and the Socialists, which were both dissolved. The 1994 elections put media magnate Silvio Berlusconi into the Prime Minister's seat; he has twice been defeated, but he emerged triumphant again in the 2008 election.
 
However, despite a productive and successful period which lasted until the mid-early 1960s, from the late 60s till the late 1980s, the country experienced an economic crisis. There was a constant fear, both inside and outside Italy (particularly in the USA), that the Communist Party, which regularly polled over 20% of the vote, would one day form a government and all sorts of dirty tricks were concocted to prevent this. From 1992 to the present day, Italy has faced massive government debt and extensive corruption. Scandals have involved all major parties, but especially the Christian Democrats and the Socialists, which were both dissolved. The 1994 elections put media magnate Silvio Berlusconi into the Prime Minister's seat; he has twice been defeated, but he emerged triumphant again in the 2008 election.
[[File:Pirelli Building, Milan, Italy.jpg|thumb|right|The modern 1960s Pirelli Tower in Milan is often considered a symbol of the new Italy, and of post-war economic growth and reconstruction.]]
+
[[Image:Pirelli Building, Milan, Italy.jpg|thumb|right|The modern 1960s Pirelli Tower in Milan is often considered a symbol of the new Italy, and of post-war economic growth and reconstruction.]]
 
Despite Unification having lasted for over 150 years, there remain significant divisions in Italy. The northern part of the country is richer and more industrialized than the south and many northerners object to being effectively asked to subsidise southerners. The ''Northern League'' political party pushes for greater autonomy for the north and for reduced fund transfers to the south. On one thing the people of the north and the south can agree: none of them likes paying for the enormous bureaucracy that is based in Rome.
 
Despite Unification having lasted for over 150 years, there remain significant divisions in Italy. The northern part of the country is richer and more industrialized than the south and many northerners object to being effectively asked to subsidise southerners. The ''Northern League'' political party pushes for greater autonomy for the north and for reduced fund transfers to the south. On one thing the people of the north and the south can agree: none of them likes paying for the enormous bureaucracy that is based in Rome.
  
Line 162: Line 163:
  
 
==Cities==
 
==Cities==
[[File:Rome Skyline (8012016319).jpg|thumb|Rome]]
+
[[Image:Neptune fountain.jpg|thumb|Rome (fountain of Neptune, Piazza Navona)]]
[[File:Florence bridges.jpg|thumb|Florence (River Arno, with Ponte Vecchio in the foreground)]]
+
[[Image:Florence bridges.jpg|thumb|Florence (River Arno, with Ponte Vecchio in the foreground)]]
 
There are hundreds of Italian cities. Here are '''nine''' of its most famous:
 
There are hundreds of Italian cities. Here are '''nine''' of its most famous:
 
<!-- '''nine''' Please do not change this list without first discussing your proposed change on the talk page. Cities lists are limited by Wikitravel policy to NINE.-->
 
<!-- '''nine''' Please do not change this list without first discussing your proposed change on the talk page. Cities lists are limited by Wikitravel policy to NINE.-->
Line 177: Line 178:
  
 
==Other destinations==
 
==Other destinations==
[[File:beachpraiaarcomagno.jpg|thumb|[[Praia a Mare]]'s stunning beach, facing Dino island]]
+
[[Image:beachpraiaarcomagno.jpg|thumb|[[Praia a Mare]]'s stunning beach, facing Dino island]]
 
[[File:Lago-Maggiore 1491a.jpg|thumb|Isola Bella, Borromean Islands, Lake Maggiore (Italy)]]
 
[[File:Lago-Maggiore 1491a.jpg|thumb|Isola Bella, Borromean Islands, Lake Maggiore (Italy)]]
 
* [[Alps|Italian Alps]] — some of the most beautiful mountains in Europe, including Mont Blanc and Mount Rosa
 
* [[Alps|Italian Alps]] — some of the most beautiful mountains in Europe, including Mont Blanc and Mount Rosa
Line 195: Line 196:
 
* Other nationals who are required to have a visa (eg: South Africans), however, must have a passport which has '''at least 3 months' validity''' beyond their period of stay in Italy.
 
* Other nationals who are required to have a visa (eg: South Africans), however, must have a passport which has '''at least 3 months' validity''' beyond their period of stay in Italy.
 
* For more information, visit [http://www.esteri.it/MAE/EN/Ministero/Servizi/Stranieri/IngressoeSoggiornoInItalia.htm this webpage of the Ministry of Foreign Affairs of Italy].}}
 
* For more information, visit [http://www.esteri.it/MAE/EN/Ministero/Servizi/Stranieri/IngressoeSoggiornoInItalia.htm this webpage of the Ministry of Foreign Affairs of Italy].}}
[[File:Here it is, The Piazza dei Miracoli! Pisa, Italy.jpg|thumb|Pisa, the Piazza dei Miracoli, with the cathedral and the leaning tower]]
+
[[Image:Pisa 03.JPG|thumb|Pisa, the Piazza dei Miracoli, with the cathedral and the leaning tower]]
  
[[File:Nápoles desde San Martino 01.JPG|thumb|Naples, a view over the city, showing the Vesuvius]]
+
[[Image:Bay of Naples and Mount Vesuvius, Italy.jpg|thumb|Naples, a view over the city, showing the Vesuvius]]
  
[[File:Canal Grande Chiesa della Salute e Dogana dal ponte dell Accademia.jpg|thumb|Venice, the Grand Canal]]
+
[[Image:Italy Venice Canal Grande.jpg|thumb|Venice, the Grand Canal]]
  
[[File:IMG 0282.JPG|thumb|Bologna, the red terracotta roofs and brick towers of the city's skyline]]
+
[[Image:IMG 0282.JPG|thumb|Bologna, the red terracotta roofs and brick towers of the city's skyline]]
  
[[File:Milano Italy Duomo-Milan-01.jpg|thumb|Milan, the Piazza del Duomo, with the stunning city medieval cathedral]]
+
[[Image:Duomo 99.JPG|thumb|Milan, the Piazza del Duomo, with the stunning city medieval cathedral]]
 
{{Schengen}}
 
{{Schengen}}
  
Line 390: Line 391:
 
* '''Medieval villages''' and towns are dotted across rural Italy, and make for pleasant day trips or scenic places for a more relaxed holiday. Two notable examples (and UNESCO World Heritage sites) are [[San Gimignano]], known for it's profusion of thin towers, and [[Assisi]], known for Saint Francis of Assisi and the Basilica di San Francesco dedicated to the saint and filled with breathtaking frescos.
 
* '''Medieval villages''' and towns are dotted across rural Italy, and make for pleasant day trips or scenic places for a more relaxed holiday. Two notable examples (and UNESCO World Heritage sites) are [[San Gimignano]], known for it's profusion of thin towers, and [[Assisi]], known for Saint Francis of Assisi and the Basilica di San Francesco dedicated to the saint and filled with breathtaking frescos.
 
* '''Etruscan Italy.''' If you have limited time and no potential to travel outside the main cities, then don't miss the amazing collection at the Etruscan Museum at Villa Giulia in Rome. Hiring a car gives access to the painted tombs and museum of [[Tarquinia]] or the enormous burial complex at [[Cerveteri]] and those are just the sites within easy reach of Rome.
 
* '''Etruscan Italy.''' If you have limited time and no potential to travel outside the main cities, then don't miss the amazing collection at the Etruscan Museum at Villa Giulia in Rome. Hiring a car gives access to the painted tombs and museum of [[Tarquinia]] or the enormous burial complex at [[Cerveteri]] and those are just the sites within easy reach of Rome.
[[File:Bikini.jpg|thumb|Roman bikinis. Mosaic from the Villa Romana at [[Piazza Armerina]], Sicily.]]
+
[[Image:Bikini.jpg|thumb|Roman bikinis. Mosaic from the Villa Romana at [[Piazza Armerina]], Sicily.]]
 
* '''The Greek Influence.''' Well-preserved Greek temples at [[Agrigento]] in the southwest of Sicily and at [[Paestum]], just south of Naples, give a good understanding of the extent of Greek influence on Italy.
 
* '''The Greek Influence.''' Well-preserved Greek temples at [[Agrigento]] in the southwest of Sicily and at [[Paestum]], just south of Naples, give a good understanding of the extent of Greek influence on Italy.
 
* '''Roman ruins.''' From the south, in Sicily, to the north of the country Italy is full of reminders of the Roman empire. In [[Taormina]], Sicily check out the Roman theatre, with excellent views of Mt. Etna on a clear day. Also in Sicily, don't miss the well-preserved mosaics at [[Piazza Armerina]]. Moving north to just south of Naples, you find [[Pompeii]] and [[Herculaneum]], covered in lava by Mt. Vesuvius and, as a result, amazingly well preserved. To [[Rome]] and every street in the center seems to have a few pieces of inscribed Roman stone built into more recent buildings. Don't miss the Colosseum, the Roman Forum, the Aqueducts, the Appian Way, and a dozen or so museums devoted to Roman ruins. Further north, the Roman amphitheatre at [[Verona]] is definitely not to be missed.
 
* '''Roman ruins.''' From the south, in Sicily, to the north of the country Italy is full of reminders of the Roman empire. In [[Taormina]], Sicily check out the Roman theatre, with excellent views of Mt. Etna on a clear day. Also in Sicily, don't miss the well-preserved mosaics at [[Piazza Armerina]]. Moving north to just south of Naples, you find [[Pompeii]] and [[Herculaneum]], covered in lava by Mt. Vesuvius and, as a result, amazingly well preserved. To [[Rome]] and every street in the center seems to have a few pieces of inscribed Roman stone built into more recent buildings. Don't miss the Colosseum, the Roman Forum, the Aqueducts, the Appian Way, and a dozen or so museums devoted to Roman ruins. Further north, the Roman amphitheatre at [[Verona]] is definitely not to be missed.
[[File:Florence Duomo from Michelangelo hill.jpg|thumb|Florence's cathedral; bell tower by Giotto to the left and the tower of the Palazzo Vecchio in front]]
+
[[Image:Florence italy duomo.jpg|thumb|Florence's cathedral; bell tower by Giotto to the left and the tower of the Palazzo Vecchio in front]]
 
* '''Christian Italy.''' The [[Rome/Vatican|Vatican]] is the seat of the Roman Catholic Church. Although inside Rome it has the status of a separate state. Don't miss St Peter's and the Vatican Museum. Rome, itself, has over 900 churches; a large number of these are worth a quick visit. Throughout Italy there is some truly amazing Christian architecture covering the Romanesque (700-1200); Gothic (1100-1450); Renaissance (1400-1600); and ornate Baroque (1600-1830) styles. Although theft of artwork has been a problem, major city churches and cathedrals retain an enormous number of paintings and sculptures and others have been moved to city and Church museums. Frescoes and mosaics are everywhere, and quite stunning. Don't just look for churches: in rural areas there are some fascinating monasteries to be discovered. When planning to visit churches, note that all but the largest are usually closed between 12.30 and 15.30.
 
* '''Christian Italy.''' The [[Rome/Vatican|Vatican]] is the seat of the Roman Catholic Church. Although inside Rome it has the status of a separate state. Don't miss St Peter's and the Vatican Museum. Rome, itself, has over 900 churches; a large number of these are worth a quick visit. Throughout Italy there is some truly amazing Christian architecture covering the Romanesque (700-1200); Gothic (1100-1450); Renaissance (1400-1600); and ornate Baroque (1600-1830) styles. Although theft of artwork has been a problem, major city churches and cathedrals retain an enormous number of paintings and sculptures and others have been moved to city and Church museums. Frescoes and mosaics are everywhere, and quite stunning. Don't just look for churches: in rural areas there are some fascinating monasteries to be discovered. When planning to visit churches, note that all but the largest are usually closed between 12.30 and 15.30.
 
* '''The Byzantine Cities.''' The Byzantines controlled northern Italy until kicked out by the Lombards in 751. [[Venice]] is of course world famous and nearby Chioggia, also in the Lagoon, is a smaller version.  [[Ravenna|Ravenna's churches]] have some incredible mosaics. Visiting Ravenna requires a bit of a detour, but it is well worth it.
 
* '''The Byzantine Cities.''' The Byzantines controlled northern Italy until kicked out by the Lombards in 751. [[Venice]] is of course world famous and nearby Chioggia, also in the Lagoon, is a smaller version.  [[Ravenna|Ravenna's churches]] have some incredible mosaics. Visiting Ravenna requires a bit of a detour, but it is well worth it.
Line 422: Line 423:
  
 
===Museums===
 
===Museums===
[[File:Galleria degli Uffizi.jpg|thumb|The Uffizi gallery in Florence, regarded as being one of the most prestigious art museums in the world.]]
+
[[Image:Galleria degli Uffizi Florence.jpg|thumb|The Uffizi gallery in Florence, regarded as being one of the most prestigious art museums in the world.]]
 
Every major city has a number of local museums, but some of them have national and international relevance.
 
Every major city has a number of local museums, but some of them have national and international relevance.
  
Line 447: Line 448:
  
 
===Visit the beach===
 
===Visit the beach===
[[File:Positano - Fornillo Beach.jpg|thumb|[[Amalfi Coast]]]]
 
  
 
In theory beach access is free to all in Italy but as with a lot of things in this country the practice may be somewhat different to the law. Many stretches of beach, particularly those close to urban areas, are let out to private concessions. In the season they cover almost all the beach with rows and rows of sunbeds (lettini) and umbrellas (ombrelloni). You have the right to pass through these establishments without being charged to get to the sea, and should be able to walk along the sea in front of them. More affordable are the beaches in [[Calabria]], most are free, you will only need to pay for the eventual equipment you want to rent.
 
In theory beach access is free to all in Italy but as with a lot of things in this country the practice may be somewhat different to the law. Many stretches of beach, particularly those close to urban areas, are let out to private concessions. In the season they cover almost all the beach with rows and rows of sunbeds (lettini) and umbrellas (ombrelloni). You have the right to pass through these establishments without being charged to get to the sea, and should be able to walk along the sea in front of them. More affordable are the beaches in [[Calabria]], most are free, you will only need to pay for the eventual equipment you want to rent.
Line 456: Line 456:
  
 
===Visit the vineyards===
 
===Visit the vineyards===
[[File:Vineyards in Chianti Country.jpg|thumb|Vineyard in [[Tuscany]]]]
 
  
 
Italy is famous for its wine. And its vineyards tend to be in the middle of some beautiful scenery. Taking an organized tour is probably your best bet. Day trips can usually be organized through your hotel if you are staying in a major wine area such as [[Chianti]] or through the local tourism office. There are several companies offering longer tours that include meals and accommodation. A simple web search for “Italian vineyard tours” or “wine tour Italy” will find them. Note that these longer tours tend to emphasise good food, great wine and a high standard of accommodation and are thus expensive.  
 
Italy is famous for its wine. And its vineyards tend to be in the middle of some beautiful scenery. Taking an organized tour is probably your best bet. Day trips can usually be organized through your hotel if you are staying in a major wine area such as [[Chianti]] or through the local tourism office. There are several companies offering longer tours that include meals and accommodation. A simple web search for “Italian vineyard tours” or “wine tour Italy” will find them. Note that these longer tours tend to emphasise good food, great wine and a high standard of accommodation and are thus expensive.  
Line 498: Line 497:
  
 
===What to buy===
 
===What to buy===
[[File:Campo dei Fiori.jpg|thumb|Market in Rome]]
 
 
 
Italy is a great place for all forms of shopping. Most cities, villages and towns, are crammed to the brim with many different forms of shops, from glitzy boutiques and huge shopping malls, to tiny art galleries, small food stores, antique dealers and general newsagents.  
 
Italy is a great place for all forms of shopping. Most cities, villages and towns, are crammed to the brim with many different forms of shops, from glitzy boutiques and huge shopping malls, to tiny art galleries, small food stores, antique dealers and general newsagents.  
  
Line 528: Line 525:
  
 
==Eat==
 
==Eat==
[[File:Troffiette genovese.jpg|thumb|Pasta with pesto and Wine.]]
+
[[Image:RedMeatWine.jpg|thumb|A traditional Italian meal, with beef with sauce and dark red wine.]]
 
[[File:Tiramisu at Garibaldi Italian Cuisine, Bangsar.jpg|thumb|200px|Tiramisu]]
 
[[File:Tiramisu at Garibaldi Italian Cuisine, Bangsar.jpg|thumb|200px|Tiramisu]]
 +
[[File:Italian gelato.png|thumb|250px|Italian gelato]]
  
 
===Cuisine===
 
===Cuisine===
Line 564: Line 562:
  
 
===Specialities===
 
===Specialities===
[[File:Gelato in Italy.jpg|thumb|250px|Italian gelato]]
 
 
 
Almost every city and region has its own specialities, a brief list of which may include:
 
Almost every city and region has its own specialities, a brief list of which may include:
  
Line 575: Line 571:
  
 
====Pizza====
 
====Pizza====
[[File:Pizza_margherita.jpeg|thumb|250px|The real pizza margherita]]
+
[[Image:Pizza_margherita.jpeg|thumb|250px|The real pizza margherita]]
 
Pizza is a quick and convenient meal.  In most cities there are pizza shops that sell by the gram.  Look for a sign '''Pizza al taglio'''. When ordering, simply point to the display or tell the attendant the type of pizza you would like (e.g. pizza margherita, pizza con patate (roasted or french fries), pizza al prosciutto (ham), etc.) and how much ("Vorrei (due fette - two slices) or (due etti - two-tenths of a kilogram) or simply say "di più" - more, or "di meno" - less, "per favore").  They will slice it, warm it in the oven, fold it in half, and wrap it in paper. Other food shops also sell pizza by the slice. Remember, getting your meal on the run can save money but some touristy sandwich shops charge an additional fee if you want to sit to eat your meal. Also, in many parts of the country pizzas have a thinner base of bread and less cheese than those found outside Italy. The most authentic, original pizzas is found in Naples - often containing few ingredients (tomato and oregano, or tomato and mozzarella). The Neapolitan one is the only traditional Italian pizza. You can eat it in Naples, of course, but you can also find some few pizzerias in other big cities which make a pizza quite similar to the real Neapolitan pizza.  
 
Pizza is a quick and convenient meal.  In most cities there are pizza shops that sell by the gram.  Look for a sign '''Pizza al taglio'''. When ordering, simply point to the display or tell the attendant the type of pizza you would like (e.g. pizza margherita, pizza con patate (roasted or french fries), pizza al prosciutto (ham), etc.) and how much ("Vorrei (due fette - two slices) or (due etti - two-tenths of a kilogram) or simply say "di più" - more, or "di meno" - less, "per favore").  They will slice it, warm it in the oven, fold it in half, and wrap it in paper. Other food shops also sell pizza by the slice. Remember, getting your meal on the run can save money but some touristy sandwich shops charge an additional fee if you want to sit to eat your meal. Also, in many parts of the country pizzas have a thinner base of bread and less cheese than those found outside Italy. The most authentic, original pizzas is found in Naples - often containing few ingredients (tomato and oregano, or tomato and mozzarella). The Neapolitan one is the only traditional Italian pizza. You can eat it in Naples, of course, but you can also find some few pizzerias in other big cities which make a pizza quite similar to the real Neapolitan pizza.  
  
Line 586: Line 582:
  
 
===Restaurants and bars===
 
===Restaurants and bars===
[[File:Ristorante Al Theatro @ Night (3500290149).jpg|thumb|There are numerous restaurants in Italian cities]]
+
[[Image:Via Veneto restaurant.jpg|thumb|There are numerous restaurants in Italian cities (like this one, in the exclusive Via Veneto, Rome)]]
 
Italian bars in the centre of major cities charge more (typically double whatever the final bill is) if you drink or eat seated at a table outside rather than standing at the bar or taking your order to go. This is because bars are charged a very high tax to place tables and chair outside, so since most people do not use tables anyway, they had decided long ago to only charge those who do. The further away you are from the center streets, the less this rule is applied. When calling into a bar for a coffee or other drink you first go to the cash register and pay for what you want. You then give the receipt to the barman, who will serve you.
 
Italian bars in the centre of major cities charge more (typically double whatever the final bill is) if you drink or eat seated at a table outside rather than standing at the bar or taking your order to go. This is because bars are charged a very high tax to place tables and chair outside, so since most people do not use tables anyway, they had decided long ago to only charge those who do. The further away you are from the center streets, the less this rule is applied. When calling into a bar for a coffee or other drink you first go to the cash register and pay for what you want. You then give the receipt to the barman, who will serve you.
 
Please note that, traditionally, bars in Italy are meant to be a quick and unceremonious matter: a coffee shot gulped standing next to counter, perhaps accompanied by a small pastry, and immediately out back to business. This becomes the rule the farther you venture from touristic areas. Coffee or beer become a thing to be enjoyed over a more laidback conversation only after dusk. For the same reason, Starbucks has long failed to catch on in Italian coffee culture, although as of 2019 the first Starbucks cafe and roastery has opened in central Milan.
 
Please note that, traditionally, bars in Italy are meant to be a quick and unceremonious matter: a coffee shot gulped standing next to counter, perhaps accompanied by a small pastry, and immediately out back to business. This becomes the rule the farther you venture from touristic areas. Coffee or beer become a thing to be enjoyed over a more laidback conversation only after dusk. For the same reason, Starbucks has long failed to catch on in Italian coffee culture, although as of 2019 the first Starbucks cafe and roastery has opened in central Milan.
Line 640: Line 636:
  
 
===Other drinks===
 
===Other drinks===
[[File:Limoncello.jpg|thumb|upright|A cold limoncello on a warm night]]
+
[[Image:Limoncello.jpg|thumb|A cold limoncello on a warm night]]
 
* '''Limoncello'''.  A liquor made of alcohol, lemon peels, and sugar. Limoncello can be considered a "moonshine" type of product (although usually made with legally obtained alcohol) as every Italian family, especially in the middle-south (near Napoli) and southern part of the country, has its own recipe for limoncello. Because lemon trees adapt so well to the Mediterreanean climate, and they produce a large amount of fruit continually throughout their long fruit-bearing season, it is not unusual to find many villa's yards filled with lemon trees bending under the weight of their crop. You can make a lot of lemonade, or better yet, brew your own limoncello. It is mainly considered a dessert liquor, served after a heavy meal (similar to amaretto), and used for different celebrations. The taste can be compared to a very strong and slightly thick lemonade flavor with an alcohol tinge to it. Best served chilled in the freezer in small glasses that have been in the freezer. It is better sipped than treated as a shooter.
 
* '''Limoncello'''.  A liquor made of alcohol, lemon peels, and sugar. Limoncello can be considered a "moonshine" type of product (although usually made with legally obtained alcohol) as every Italian family, especially in the middle-south (near Napoli) and southern part of the country, has its own recipe for limoncello. Because lemon trees adapt so well to the Mediterreanean climate, and they produce a large amount of fruit continually throughout their long fruit-bearing season, it is not unusual to find many villa's yards filled with lemon trees bending under the weight of their crop. You can make a lot of lemonade, or better yet, brew your own limoncello. It is mainly considered a dessert liquor, served after a heavy meal (similar to amaretto), and used for different celebrations. The taste can be compared to a very strong and slightly thick lemonade flavor with an alcohol tinge to it. Best served chilled in the freezer in small glasses that have been in the freezer. It is better sipped than treated as a shooter.
  
Line 708: Line 704:
  
 
==Stay safe==
 
==Stay safe==
[[File:Carabinieri a cavallo.jpg|thumb|250px|right|Mounted Carabinieri in Milan.]]
 
 
 
For emergencies, call '''112'''. This phone number works for every type of emergency, as you'll speak with an operator that will contact the appropriate authority (police, fire department, ...)
 
For emergencies, call '''112'''. This phone number works for every type of emergency, as you'll speak with an operator that will contact the appropriate authority (police, fire department, ...)
  
Line 769: Line 763:
  
 
==Stay healthy==
 
==Stay healthy==
[[File:Careggi Hospital entry.jpg|thumb|250px|Careggi hospital in Florence.]]
 
 
 
Italian hospitals are public and offer completely free high-standard treatments for EU travellers, although, as anywhere else, you may have a long wait to be served. Emergency assistance is granted even to non-EU travelers. For non-emergency assistance, non-EU citizens are required to pay out-of-pocket, there is no convention with US health insurances (although some insurance companies might later reimburse these expenses).  Nonetheless, a requirement for a Schengen visa is that you have valid travel insurance which includes emergency expenses covering your entire trip anyway.   
 
Italian hospitals are public and offer completely free high-standard treatments for EU travellers, although, as anywhere else, you may have a long wait to be served. Emergency assistance is granted even to non-EU travelers. For non-emergency assistance, non-EU citizens are required to pay out-of-pocket, there is no convention with US health insurances (although some insurance companies might later reimburse these expenses).  Nonetheless, a requirement for a Schengen visa is that you have valid travel insurance which includes emergency expenses covering your entire trip anyway.   
  

You may have to refresh your browser window in order to view the most recent changes to an article.

All contributions to Wikitravel must be licensed under the Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike 3.0. By clicking "Save" below, you acknowledge that you agree to the site license as well as the following:

  • If you do not want your work to be re-used on other web sites and modified by other users please do not submit!
  • All contributions must be your own original work or work that is explicitly licensed under a CC-BY-SA compatible license.
  • Text and/or images published on another web site or in a book are likely copyrighted and should not be submitted here!
  • Wikitravel has strong guidelines on links to external web sites. Links to booking engines, hotel and restaurant aggregator sites, or other third-party sites will be deleted.
  • Contributions that appear to be marketing or advertising will be deleted.

To protect the wiki against automated edit spam, we kindly ask you to solve the following CAPTCHA:

Cancel | Editing help (opens in new window)