YOU CAN EDIT THIS PAGE! Just click any blue "Edit" link and start writing!

Editing Istanbul/Bosphorus

Jump to: navigation, search

Warning: You are not logged in. Your IP address will be publicly visible if you make any edits. If you log in or create an account, your edits will be attributed to your username, along with other benefits.

The edit can be undone. Please check the comparison below to verify that this is what you want to do, and then save the changes below to finish undoing the edit.
Latest revision Your text
Line 1: Line 1:
 
{{pagebanner|Istanbul Bosphorus Banner.jpg}}
 
{{pagebanner|Istanbul Bosphorus Banner.jpg}}
  
Along the '''Bosphorus''' (Turkish: ''Boğaz'', but ''Boğaziçi''—literally “inside the Bosphous”—is preferred when refering to the areas on the bank of Bosphorus, rather than the Bosphorus itself), the strait that lies between the Sea of Marmara and the Black Sea, and separating Europe and Asia, lies a number of neighborhoods each with a different character (possibly due to the fact that they all started as seperate fishing villages and some are still physically seperated from each other by lush woodlands), palaces of the late Ottoman period, and parks. This is quite easily one of the most scenic—yet largely overlooked by travellers—parts of [[Istanbul]], which reaches its zenith during late spring (especially in early May), when the Judas trees (Turkish: ''Erguvan'', Latin: ''Cercis siliquastrum''), which are some sort of symbol of the Bosphorus and dotting the hills along the Bosphorus, are in full bloom of their deep-pink flowers that engulf both shores of the strait.
+
Along the '''Bosphorus''' (Turkish: ''Boğaz'', but ''Boğaziçi'' –literally “inside the Bosphous”- is preferred when refering to the areas on the bank of Bosphorus, rather than the Bosphorus itself), the strait that lies between the Sea of Marmara and the Black Sea, and separating Europe and Asia, lies a number of neighborhoods each with a different character (possibly due to the fact that they all started as seperate fishing villages and some are still physically seperated from each other by lush woodlands), palaces of the late Ottoman period, and parks. This is quite easily one of the most scenic—yet largely overlooked by travellers—parts of [[Istanbul]], which reaches its zenith during late spring (especially in early May), when the Judas trees (Turkish: ''Erguvan'', Latin: ''Cercis siliquastrum''), which are some sort of symbol of the Bosphorus and dotting the hills along the Bosphorus, are in full bloom of their deep-pink flowers that engulf both shores of the strait.
  
 
[[File:Ortakoey Istanbul Bosporusbruecke Mrz2005.jpg|thumb|300px|Ortaköy Mosque—one of the symbols of the city]]
 
[[File:Ortakoey Istanbul Bosporusbruecke Mrz2005.jpg|thumb|300px|Ortaköy Mosque—one of the symbols of the city]]

You may have to refresh your browser window in order to view the most recent changes to an article.

All contributions to Wikitravel must be licensed under the Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike 3.0. By clicking "Save" below, you acknowledge that you agree to the site license as well as the following:

  • If you do not want your work to be re-used on other web sites and modified by other users please do not submit!
  • All contributions must be your own original work or work that is explicitly licensed under a CC-BY-SA compatible license.
  • Text and/or images published on another web site or in a book are likely copyrighted and should not be submitted here!
  • Wikitravel has strong guidelines on links to external web sites. Links to booking engines, hotel and restaurant aggregator sites, or other third-party sites will be deleted.
  • Contributions that appear to be marketing or advertising will be deleted.

To protect the wiki against automated edit spam, we kindly ask you to solve the following CAPTCHA:

Cancel | Editing help (opens in new window)

Templates used on this page: