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Difference between revisions of "High-speed rail in China"

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High-speed rail in China

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China is building a high-speed rail network, similar to French TGV or Japanese "bullet trains". Top speeds are around 240 km/hour, 150 miles an hour. The trains are clean, comfortable and modern. Prices are reasonable and, on most routes, departures are frequent. These are easily the best way of getting around China where available.
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[[China]] is building a high-speed rail network, similar to French TGV or Japanese "bullet trains". Top speeds are around 240 km/hour, 150 miles an hour. The trains are clean, comfortable and modern. Prices are reasonable and, on most routes, departures are frequent. These are easily the best way of getting around China where available.
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The fast trains are called '''CRH''', China High-speed Rail. At some train stations. there is a separate CRH ticket office; at others, CRH tickets are sold at separate stations in the main ticket office. In either case, just look for the "CRH" signs.
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Train numbers for these trains all start with "D". Intermediate-speed trains have a "T" prefix, the slower and more crowded ones generally have "K" or no letter.
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== Lines in service ==
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As of mid-2008, the following lines are in service:
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* [[Shanghai]] - [[Suzhou] - [[Wuxi]] - [[Nanjing]]. Shanghai to Nanjing is the busiest stretch of railway on Earth, and was one of the first to get the high-spped service. Time for the whole route is about two hours. Wuxi-Suzhou and Suzhou-Shanghai are both under a half hour.
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* Shanghai - [[Hangzhou]]. This is about a two-hour trip.
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* Shanghai - [[Qingdao]].

Revision as of 19:07, 30 June 2008

    This article is a travel topic

China is building a high-speed rail network, similar to French TGV or Japanese "bullet trains". Top speeds are around 240 km/hour, 150 miles an hour. The trains are clean, comfortable and modern. Prices are reasonable and, on most routes, departures are frequent. These are easily the best way of getting around China where available.

The fast trains are called CRH, China High-speed Rail. At some train stations. there is a separate CRH ticket office; at others, CRH tickets are sold at separate stations in the main ticket office. In either case, just look for the "CRH" signs.

Train numbers for these trains all start with "D". Intermediate-speed trains have a "T" prefix, the slower and more crowded ones generally have "K" or no letter.

Lines in service

As of mid-2008, the following lines are in service:

  • Shanghai - [[Suzhou] - Wuxi - Nanjing. Shanghai to Nanjing is the busiest stretch of railway on Earth, and was one of the first to get the high-spped service. Time for the whole route is about two hours. Wuxi-Suzhou and Suzhou-Shanghai are both under a half hour.
  • Shanghai - Hangzhou. This is about a two-hour trip.
  • Shanghai - Qingdao.