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* '''Always be punctual to any appointment or meeting.''' Even arriving a minute late to a meeting or a few minutes early is regarded as rude and inconsiderate, unless you can provide a good reason for it. It is good form to inform your hosts if you seem to be running late for any reason. For example, if you're late due to public transport (it's not unheard of for the driver to leave you behind). Most Germans tend to arrive to meetings, appointments and so on '''5-10 minutes early''' and it's best to follow suit with this to not stand out like a sore thumb.  
 
* '''Always be punctual to any appointment or meeting.''' Even arriving a minute late to a meeting or a few minutes early is regarded as rude and inconsiderate, unless you can provide a good reason for it. It is good form to inform your hosts if you seem to be running late for any reason. For example, if you're late due to public transport (it's not unheard of for the driver to leave you behind). Most Germans tend to arrive to meetings, appointments and so on '''5-10 minutes early''' and it's best to follow suit with this to not stand out like a sore thumb.  
  
* '''Always be courteous wherever possible.'''  Germans tend to be very formal people, especially in the business world. Some colleagues that have worked together and known each other for many years still call each by their title and surname. When a German introduces himself to you, he/she will often simply state their surname, prompting you to call them ""Herr/Frau..." ("Mr/Mrs...")". Using first names immediately may be met with a frosty reception. Whenever an elderly or a highly ranked person walks into an appointment, home or business meeting, always stand up.  
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* '''Always be courteous wherever possible.'''  Germans tend to be very formal people, especially in the business world. Some colleagues that have worked together ank known each other for many years still call each by their title and surname. When a German introduces himself to you, he/she will often simply state their surname, prompting you to call them ""Herr/Frau..." ("Mr/Mrs...")". Using first names immediately may be met with a frosty reception. Whenever an elderly or a highly ranked person walks into an appointment, home or business meeting, always stand up.  
  
 
* '''Women are treated with a degree of chivalry.''' Female travellers shouldn't be surprised or be confused when their male German acquaintances or colleagues walk in front of them, open every door in front of them, walk to the left side of them, and/or relinquish their role to the maître d' when sitting in a restaurant. Male travellers should also take note that this will all be expected by German women too.  
 
* '''Women are treated with a degree of chivalry.''' Female travellers shouldn't be surprised or be confused when their male German acquaintances or colleagues walk in front of them, open every door in front of them, walk to the left side of them, and/or relinquish their role to the maître d' when sitting in a restaurant. Male travellers should also take note that this will all be expected by German women too.  

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