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* When your journey involves multiple time zones, the flight purser will usually announce the local time at your port-of-arrival.  The local time at your destination is also available from the flight path/airshow channel of your in-flight entertainment system if your flight is equipped with it. Adjust your watch to the time announced to avoid confusion with the timetables at the airport, especially if you have a connecting flight.   
 
* When your journey involves multiple time zones, the flight purser will usually announce the local time at your port-of-arrival.  The local time at your destination is also available from the flight path/airshow channel of your in-flight entertainment system if your flight is equipped with it. Adjust your watch to the time announced to avoid confusion with the timetables at the airport, especially if you have a connecting flight.   
 
* Obtain your boarding pass for your next flight (either at a transfer desk if provided or regular check-in) if you have not done so already.
 
* Obtain your boarding pass for your next flight (either at a transfer desk if provided or regular check-in) if you have not done so already.
* Many international airports around the world do not require you to go through immigration or customs if you are merely connecting to another country and will not remain in their country.  In those airports, you can immediately walk off the airplane into the regular sterile area of the terminal, and walk directly to your next gate to await boarding.
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* Many international airports around the world do not require you to go through immigration or customs if you are merely connecting to an international flight to another country, and will not remain in their country.  In those airports, you can walk off the airplane into the regular sterile area of the terminal and walk directly to your next gate to await boarding.
 
* At international airports in the United States, Canada, and a few other countries, all arriving international passengers are always required to proceed to immigration and customs. Small airports make passengers deplane by airstairs and proceed across the tarmac by foot or bus to a dedicated international arrival facility. Large airports build a parallel set of bridges or corridors, separate from the regular sterile area, which directly link all international gates to their immigration and customs inspection station.  
 
* At international airports in the United States, Canada, and a few other countries, all arriving international passengers are always required to proceed to immigration and customs. Small airports make passengers deplane by airstairs and proceed across the tarmac by foot or bus to a dedicated international arrival facility. Large airports build a parallel set of bridges or corridors, separate from the regular sterile area, which directly link all international gates to their immigration and customs inspection station.  
* In all countries, if you came from an international flight and are continuing on to a domestic flight, you will need to clear passport control, possibly claim your luggage (even if it is checked through to your final destination) and clear customs.  You must then check-in your luggage again to ensure its loading into your next flight. If your baggage has already been checked through to your final destination at first check-in, some airports provide a special "connecting flights" bag drops right after customs where you can simply drop it off, instead of have to drag it all the way through the terminal to the regular check-in desks.  In the United States, post-customs connecting flights bag drops are also useful for international travelers in transit who will not be remaining in the US.
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* If you came from an international flight and are continuing on to a domestic flight, you will need to clear passport control, possibly claim your luggage (even if it is checked through to your final destination) and clear customs and eventually check-in your luggage again to ensure its loading into your next flight. If your baggage has already been checked through to your final destination at first check-in, some airports provide a special "connecting flights" desk or bag drop conveyor belt where you can simply drop off your luggage instead of have to drag it all the way through the terminal to the regular check-in area.   
* If you are connecting through a US preclearance airport to a flight bound for the United States, you may have to pass through US immigration and customs ''before'' you board your flight. Airlines that support preclearance connections take digital photographs of all baggage at check-in which will ultimately connect to US-bound flights at preclearance airportsWhen you reach preclearance, the immigration officer will present you with the photograph and ask you to confirm that it is your bag.
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* There are a few scenarios when baggage will have to be collected at intermediate stopovers and checked-in as usual for loading onto the next flight.  In this case, you will need to undergo the usual visa application, clear formalities (ie passport control and customs) if at least the first leg is international. Some of them include the following:
* There are a few scenarios when baggage will have to be collected at intermediate stopovers and checked-in as usual for loading onto the next flight.  In this case, you will need to undergo the usual visa application and clear formalities (i.e. passport control and customs) if at least the first leg is international. Some of them include the following:
 
 
**either your first or next leg involves a low cost carrier
 
**either your first or next leg involves a low cost carrier
 
**you booked both flights separately
 
**you booked both flights separately

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