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To board your flight, you'll at least need an airline boarding pass, '''paper ticket''' (if you were issued with one), and certainly some form of '''government-issued photo identification''' (perhaps less for toddlers) - check with the carrier you are flying with to find-out acceptable identification.  If your flight (or connecting flight) takes you to other countries, you'll also need a '''passport''', often with an expiration date at least six months after the date you start the trip.  Depending on countries you'll fly to or make connections in, you may need one or more '''visas'''.  Check in advance with your agent or airline as well as the website of the embassy of the countries you wish to visit; without all the necessary documentation, your trip may be at risk.  The credit card used to purchase the tickets may also be required to be presented for verification especially if you booked online, so bring that as well.   
 
To board your flight, you'll at least need an airline boarding pass, '''paper ticket''' (if you were issued with one), and certainly some form of '''government-issued photo identification''' (perhaps less for toddlers) - check with the carrier you are flying with to find-out acceptable identification.  If your flight (or connecting flight) takes you to other countries, you'll also need a '''passport''', often with an expiration date at least six months after the date you start the trip.  Depending on countries you'll fly to or make connections in, you may need one or more '''visas'''.  Check in advance with your agent or airline as well as the website of the embassy of the countries you wish to visit; without all the necessary documentation, your trip may be at risk.  The credit card used to purchase the tickets may also be required to be presented for verification especially if you booked online, so bring that as well.   
  
Countries that do not require visas from your nationality for short visits may require you to apply for some form of electronic travel authorisation.  These countries include Australia (ETA or eVisitor), Canada (eTA), and the United States (ESTA).  You may need to do this days in advance of intended travel.  Without this, your carrier will not accept you for travel.  Qualifying nationals can obtain this directly from the website of the host country's immigration authority.  Unless more information or referrals are needed, the applicant will find out the outcome almost immediately.  
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Countries that do not require visas from your nationality for short visits may require you to apply for some form of electronic travel authorisation.  These countries include Australia (ETA or eVisitor), Canada (eTA), and the United States (ESTA).  You may need to do this days in advance of intended travel.  Without this, your carrier will not accept you for travel.  Qualifying nationals can obtain this online.  
  
 
Any authority looking at airline tickets, boarding passes, passports or other identification will examine names carefully. TSA and other security authorities often require that key papers '''precisely reflect your full name''' (middle name or mother's maiden surname is usually optional and for two given names, spaces between them are not needed).  In other words, the name in your boarding pass must precisely match your photo ID.  This applies to all persons in your travel group, e.g. spouse, children.  This starts by making sure that whoever books your trip accurately enters each full name on the reservations and later-generated tickets.
 
Any authority looking at airline tickets, boarding passes, passports or other identification will examine names carefully. TSA and other security authorities often require that key papers '''precisely reflect your full name''' (middle name or mother's maiden surname is usually optional and for two given names, spaces between them are not needed).  In other words, the name in your boarding pass must precisely match your photo ID.  This applies to all persons in your travel group, e.g. spouse, children.  This starts by making sure that whoever books your trip accurately enters each full name on the reservations and later-generated tickets.

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