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Buying or renting a car in New Zealand

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(Car markets)
(Other expenses)
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* Transferring the car into your name: take proof of ID to a PostShop or AA office and fill in the appropriate form. For less than $10 the transfer will be registered. The seller should not give you the keys until you have done this. When you sell, make sure your buyer does the same, otherwise you will be liable for any parking offences or traffic violations. This will come up if you return to New Zealand, so do it properly and get the car off your hands. You will need a New Zealand address; it is ok to use your hostel.
 
* Transferring the car into your name: take proof of ID to a PostShop or AA office and fill in the appropriate form. For less than $10 the transfer will be registered. The seller should not give you the keys until you have done this. When you sell, make sure your buyer does the same, otherwise you will be liable for any parking offences or traffic violations. This will come up if you return to New Zealand, so do it properly and get the car off your hands. You will need a New Zealand address; it is ok to use your hostel.
  
* Insurance; basic third party personal cover is included in the registration (time remaining on this is shown on the windscreen sticker). However this will only cover you for damage you do to another person, so it is highly recommended that you get property cover too. This will cover any damage you do to another car. Overseas visitors can get cover from the Budget Backpacker hostels (BBH) or the National Auto Club (NAC) - the latter is cheaper for older travellers.
+
* Insurance; basic third party personal cover is included in the registration (time remaining on this is shown on the windscreen sticker). However this will only cover you for damage you do to another person, so it is highly recommended that you get property cover too. This will cover any damage you do to another car. Overseas visitors can get cover from the '''Backpackers Car Market'''[http://www.backpackerscarmarket.co.nz/?action=page&page_id=170&section_language=0] or Budget Backpacker hostels (BBH)  
 
 
 
* Registration: this can be bought in chunks of one month upwards, bigger chunks being cheaper. Runs about £150 for three months. Go to the Post Shop.
 
* Registration: this can be bought in chunks of one month upwards, bigger chunks being cheaper. Runs about £150 for three months. Go to the Post Shop.
  
 
** AA breakdown cover: again not essential, but a good idea. About $99 for three months overseas visitor cover. Be aware that you will not see a smart yellow van like you do in the UK, the NZ AA is contracted out although help is still there. Also be aware that remoter areas do not have mobile phone cover.
 
** AA breakdown cover: again not essential, but a good idea. About $99 for three months overseas visitor cover. Be aware that you will not see a smart yellow van like you do in the UK, the NZ AA is contracted out although help is still there. Also be aware that remoter areas do not have mobile phone cover.
 
  
 
== Car markets ==
 
== Car markets ==

Revision as of 22:34, 12 August 2009

    This article is a travel topic

Driving in New Zealand is a great activity which, not surprisingly, requires a car. This article discusses some ideas for acquiring a car in New Zealand if you don't already have one. It is edited from the excellent article already up on Buying or renting a car in Australia

Buy or rent?

Car Rental in NZ is not too expensive, but the general guideline is that if your trip is longer than about 8 weeks, it is worth buying instead. Remember that you probably need about a week at either end of your trip for buying and selling. You will also need to pay for insurance check these prices for third party insurance, [1](not compulsory but a VERY good idea), AA membership (ditto), registration/warrant of fitness (if applicable) and any fixes. So it can be a gamble to buy.

New Zealand is not very big and the ins and outs of travellers do affect the market. Cars are pricier and scarcer in October/November, and cheaper/more common in March/April, matching when most travellers arrive and leave. That said, I've now owned four New Zealand cars bought and sold at these times, and never lost more than $200 each time. Actually made a profit on one car!

Tips for renting in New Zealand

You can rent a car in New Zealand if:

  • You're over 21 years old and the holder of a valid international drivers' licence or a current local licence. UK licence holders may drive for 6 months in Australia (after which they are required to take a local driving test), and it is usually accepted by rental companies.
  • Some vehicle hire companies require the driver to be over the age of 25. Other companies have lower minimum age requirements, such as 18 or 21, and may require a surcharge.
  • You understand and agree to uphold the road rules of New Zealand. It's especially easy for visitors from the UK or South Africa to drive in New Zealand, as traffic drives on the left, BUT remember the local rules and that conditions are different!

Requirements for cars; many backpackers go for a station wagon as they are planning to sleep in it to save money on accommodation. Before you do this, remember: New Zealand has an excellent network of inexpensive hostels and campsites, and also one major crime problem: theft from cars. A 'saloon' with a secure boot which hides all your possessions will be much safer for your kit. Also be aware that hostel owners don't generally like you sleeping in the car outside and expecting to use the hostel showers etc, as this will overload the place.

Tips for buying

Many of these tips are true regardless of where you are looking to buy a car, but there are a few concerns specific to cars in New Zealand that you should be aware of.

  • Because fixing cars is cheap in NZ and it receives lots of Japanese imports, many cars that would be completely uneconomic in Europe are still on the road, sometimes going round and round the country with a succession of backpacker owners. Ideally you want a car that has just come into the backpacker circuit after a long time with one lady owner and a full service history. They do exist but they take some finding.
  • Don't buy a car you have not test driven yourself for at least around the block. If you are too scared to drive it, ask the seller to take you on a short ride and tell him what you would like him to do: brake sharp, accelerate fast, etc. New Zealand insurance system means you are covered for third-party personal injury on any car you drive (very handy for test drives) but that is all, so don't hit anything.
  • Don't buy a car (either from a garage or private person) if you do not have at least some basic knowledge of cars and know what to look for.
  • Don't buy a car from a dealer unless he is specialized in providing for backpackers and has a good reputation (ask him for feedback from his customers and check the Internet).
  • Don't buy a car that is leaking any fluid (black=engine oil/brake fluid, brown=engine oil/brake fluid, red=gearbox, green=radiator or other.), has an oily looking engine head or rust on important parts of the chassis such as the door areas, or near the suspensions.
  • Don't buy a car that has problems with the gearbox (automatic or manual) - this type of repair can be very expensive. Don't buy the argument that you will have to use overdrive or use neutral position when parking.
  • Don't buy a car that doesn't stop (SHARP!) when you want it to stop. Check all the car lights with the help of a friend.
  • New Zealand cars over three years old need a Warrant of Fitness (Wof) inspection every six months. This can cost as little as $30 and like the MoT in England, is not a guarantee of mechanical condition. Nonetheless, try to buy a car with a new WoF
  • Do buy a car that can easily and cheaply be fixed; this means a Japanese model. Unlike Australia, Fords are expensive to fix in NZ.
  • Due to NZ's low population, cars are much easier to buy and sell in the main cities. This means Auckland or Christchurch, the two gateways, and to a lesser extent Wellington and Dunedin. Many travellers buy in Auckland and sell in Christchurch, so you could try arranging your travels the other way, but I've found it doesn't make too much different. Remember that Auckland has five times as many people as Christchurch.

'New Zealand New'

This concept needs some explaining. New Zealand imports many Japanese cars; the Japanese roadworthy requirements are so stringent that it may not be worth fixing a car that is only a few years old, so off it goes to NZ. Cars in Japan can have a hard life, so ideally you want a car that came straight to NZ and didn't drive round Tokyo first. To tell which is which, look at the dates on the registration sticker; it will show the year of the car and a smaller month and year. If these are the same, the car is NZ new; if not (e.g. '1990 Toyota Corona' with a date of 11/95') the car has spent five years in Japan first. Not necessarily a no-go, but be aware. The locals much prefer NZ new.

Other expenses

  • Transferring the car into your name: take proof of ID to a PostShop or AA office and fill in the appropriate form. For less than $10 the transfer will be registered. The seller should not give you the keys until you have done this. When you sell, make sure your buyer does the same, otherwise you will be liable for any parking offences or traffic violations. This will come up if you return to New Zealand, so do it properly and get the car off your hands. You will need a New Zealand address; it is ok to use your hostel.
  • Insurance; basic third party personal cover is included in the registration (time remaining on this is shown on the windscreen sticker). However this will only cover you for damage you do to another person, so it is highly recommended that you get property cover too. This will cover any damage you do to another car. Overseas visitors can get cover from the Backpackers Car Market[2] or Budget Backpacker hostels (BBH)
  • Registration: this can be bought in chunks of one month upwards, bigger chunks being cheaper. Runs about £150 for three months. Go to the Post Shop.
    • AA breakdown cover: again not essential, but a good idea. About $99 for three months overseas visitor cover. Be aware that you will not see a smart yellow van like you do in the UK, the NZ AA is contracted out although help is still there. Also be aware that remoter areas do not have mobile phone cover.

Car markets

Auckland and Christchurch both have car markets. As, when buying anywhere in New Zealand it is highly recommended that you do both a legal and mechanical check before you buy. When it comes to selling, don't give away your flight date; if it is tomorrow they will smell the desperation and you'll be lucky to get $100 for the car. A good answer to 'when are you flying?' is 'when I sell the car'.

Auckland has two car markets, the main one is on Sunday at Ellerslie Racecourse. Sellers $20, free to buyers. Turn up before 9am if you can, it will all be finished by 12. Onsite registration transfer and mechanical inspections.

The other is the Backpackers Car Market located in the city centre. www.backpackerscarmarket.co.nz , the backpackers car market is a good place to find cheap cars and vans. It is open from 9.30 am to 5pm everyday,and is located at 20 East Street, Auckland. Follow this link for a map [3]

Christchurch's similar operation is at Christchurch's Addington Raceway on Sunday from 9 am.

Rental companies

New Zealand Rental Car Hire. Search and compare rental car companies in New Zealand for the best deal at the right price. http://www.nzrentalcarhire.com

Compare New Zealand Rental Cars. Rental car search comparison site. http://www.comparenewzealandrentalcars.com

Rental aggregator websites

Used vehicle sales websites

www.backpackerscarmarket.co.nz - This is the website for the backpackers car market in Auckland and Christchurch, you can get information about buying and selling and local road laws etc. Other information includes insurance info, ferry tickets and road side assistance.

www.buy-sell-exchange - This is online version of buy, sell & exchange weekly paper, what kiwis have used (and still do use)to buy and sell their things before trademe. Excellent for cheap wheels. Note that it is very likely that same car has been listed on both trademe and buysell due to both sites' popularity.

www.carzonline.co.nz - Offers quality new and used cars at discount wholesale / bargain prices. CarZonline is committed to find the best car deal in New Zealand.

www.trademe.co.nz - This is a kiwi equivalent of ebay. Its motor section covers all regions of NZ and you can arrange for pre-bidding inspection in all cases.

See also


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