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Difference between revisions of "Yiddish phrasebook"

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Yiddish is spoken as a daily language in some parts of [[America]], mostly in [[New York (city)|New York City]].
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Yiddish is spoken as a daily language in some parts of [[United States of America|America]], mostly in [[New York (city)|New York City]].
  
 
Yiddish is written with the same alphabet as Hebrew, and is written from right to left.
 
Yiddish is written with the same alphabet as Hebrew, and is written from right to left.

Revision as of 00:43, 4 September 2005

Yiddish is spoken as a daily language in some parts of America, mostly in New York City.

Yiddish is written with the same alphabet as Hebrew, and is written from right to left.

Pronunciation guide

Phrase list

Some phrases in this phrasebook still need to be translated. If you know anything about this language, you can help by plunging forward and translating a phrase.


Basics

Hello. 
sholem-aleykhem. (שלום-עליכם)
Hello (to you) (in response to a "Hello"). 
aleykhem-sholem (עליכמ־שלום)
How are you? 
(...)
Fine, thank you. 
(...)
What is your name? 
(...)
My name is ______ . 
(...).
Nice to meet you. 
(...).
Please. 
(...)
Thank you. 
(...)
You're welcome. 
(...)
Yes. 
yo (יא)
No. 
neyn. (נײן)
Excuse me. (getting attention
Excuse me. (begging pardon
I'm sorry. 
Goodbye 
Goodbye (informal
I can't speak Yiddish [well]. 
.
Do you speak English? 
Is there someone here who speaks English? 
Help! 
oyshelfn!
Good morning. 
.
Good evening. 
.
Good night. 
Gabon.
Good night (to sleep
A gute nakht.
I don't understand. 
Where is the toilet? 

Variants

Actions

Destination Docents

In other languages