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Wolverine Service

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Wolverine Service is an Amtrak train route connecting downtown Chicago to Detroit/Pontiac, Michigan several times daily. The journey takes about 7.5 hours, longer if delays occur along the route. Equipment used is common to Amtrak's shorter routes with single-level passengers cars and a snack bar car. The short trains may either be pulled or pushed depending on direction traveled.

Route Overview

The Wolverine begins its eastbound journey at Chicago's Union Station [1]. Passengers see central and south Chicago as the train eases out of the station. The train heads east through the industrial areas of Whiting (early and mid-day trains stop at Hammond-Whiting station) and Gary, before reaching the relatively open countryside of NE Indiana (mid-day train stops at Michigan City. After a stop in Niles, Michigan, the train continues through SW Michigan, stopping in Kalamazoo, Battle Creek, Albion (mid-day train only), Jackson, Ann Arbor, Dearborn and Detroit. The train then turns north, stopping in Detroit suburbs Royal Oak, Birmingham, and Pontiac.

The route is 304 Miles in length.

Travel to Canada

International connections are possible by disembarking the train in Detroit, catching a Taxi to the Windsor-Detroit Tunnel, and riding the Tunnel Bus to Windsor, Ontario. Once on the Canadian side, travelers would need to ride the city bus or take another taxi to the Walkerville Via Rail station. Via offers several trains/day from Windsor to Toronto, but travelers would be advised to take the 350 Amtrak train (early morning) so as to arrive in Detroit around 4PM. This should leave sufficient time to make a connection in Walkerville/Windsor.

Cautions

This route is somewhat notorious for delays due to freight traffic in/around Chicago. Amtrak owns the rail line from Porter, IN to Kalamazoo, so delays there are uncommon, but other areas are owned by freight companies which have their own priorities.

The Detroit station is located in the New Center area of the city, which is a business district and fairly deserted after dark. Travelers are advised not to walk the streets around the station after dark, but to stick close until picked up by ground transportation.

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