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(Finding travel information)
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Welcome to [[Wikitravel:About|Wikitravel]]! We, the [[Wikitravel:Wikitravellers|Wikitravellers]] who've made it, hope that you enjoy what you see and that you join us in making a [[:shared:Copyleft|free]], up-to-date, complete and reliable world-wide travel guide.
 
Welcome to [[Wikitravel:About|Wikitravel]]! We, the [[Wikitravel:Wikitravellers|Wikitravellers]] who've made it, hope that you enjoy what you see and that you join us in making a [[:shared:Copyleft|free]], up-to-date, complete and reliable world-wide travel guide.
  
==Finding travel information==
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Dear Visitor,
  
Travel guides on Wikitravel are mostly arranged geographically.  You generally won't find articles on attractions, hotels and restaurants, but you hopefully will find all that information and more in our destination guide articles for countries, cities, and towns.  
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The sands of Jordan have preserved long years of dynastic history, yielding a rich variety of evidence, including architecture and literature but unfortunately for many people Jordan begins and ends with the magical ancient Nabataean city of Petra. And it's true, Petra is without doubt one of the Middle East's most spectacular, unmissable sights, battling it out with Machu Picchu or Angkor Wat for the title of the worlds most dramatic 'lost city'.
  
You can try '''[[Wikitravel:Search help|searching]]''' for the destination you are interested in. You may be taken immediately to a guide for that destination, or if there isn't a guide on that destination, you will see a list of articles that mention it. You can also try searching for the name of a attraction you are looking for, and the search will return a list of relevant articles.
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Yet there's so much more to see in Jordan - ruined Roman cities, Crusader castles, desert citadels and powerful biblical sites: the brook where Jesus was baptised, the fortress where Herod beheaded John the Baptist, and the mountain top where Moses cast eyes on the Promised Land. Biblical scenes are not just consigned to the past in Jordan; you'll see plenty of men wearing full-flowing robes and leading herds of livestock across the timeless desert. But it's not all crusty ruins. Jordan's capital Amman is a modern, culturally diverse Arab city which is light years away from the typical clichés of Middle Eastern exoticism. The country also offers some of the wildest adventures in the region, as well as an incredibly varied backdrop ranging from the red desert sands of Wadi Rum to the brilliant blues of the coral-filled Gulf of Aqaba; from rich palm-filled wadis to the lifeless Dead Sea. Ultimately it's the sensual delights of daily life in the Middle East that you'll hanker for longest after you return home; the bittersweet taste of cardamom coffee or the smell of a richly scented nargileh (water pipe); the intoxicating swirl of Arabic pop sliding out of an Amman doorway and the deafening silence of the desert.
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Jordanians are a passionate and proud people and the country truly welcomes visitors with open arms. Despite being squeezed between the hotspots of Iraq, Saudi Arabia and Israel & the Palestinian Territories, Jordan is probably the safest and most stable country in the region. Regardless of your nationality, you'll be greeted with nothing but courtesy and hospitality in this gem of a country.
  
Alternatively, you can '''browse''' through our geographical hierarchy.  You can start at the continents and regions listed on our [[Main Page]], and work your way down through the region, city and district links to the area you are interested in.
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Jihad Salamein
 
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After you have found the guide for the area you are interested in, there may still be more information waiting for you to read.  We don't cover information on how to get into a country in every destination guide.  You won't find visa information for [[Australia]] in the [[Sydney]] article.  So, if you are coming from further afield, you may want to refer to the breadcrumb links at the top of the page, and read the country or region guide, to make sure you have the full picture.
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We don't list general travel information in every guide.  We have helpful articles on things like [[money]], [[visa|visas]], how to [[stay safe]] and how to deal with [[Talk|language barriers]] in our [[travel topics|list of travel topics]].
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Remember that Wikitravel is an open guide that anyone can edit.  Often that means you can get up to the minute information and inside information on attractions and the latest buzz, but sometimes it means that some information can be unverified and unreliable.  As with any other guide, you should double check and confirm any information that is critical to the success of your travels.
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If you have particular travel questions that aren't covered in a guide, you can ask a [[Wikitravel:What is a docent?|docent]].  A docent is a volunteer guide, and if there is one for your area there will be a link in the sidebar on the left containing their contact information. 
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For general questions, post a message in our [[Wikitravel:Travellers' pub|Travellers' pub]].
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You're free to use the articles in Wikitravel in almost any way, thanks to our [[:shared:Copyleft|copyleft]] license.
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==Share your knowledge==
 
==Share your knowledge==

Revision as of 02:03, 28 December 2011

Welcome to Wikitravel! We, the Wikitravellers who've made it, hope that you enjoy what you see and that you join us in making a free, up-to-date, complete and reliable world-wide travel guide.

Dear Visitor,

The sands of Jordan have preserved long years of dynastic history, yielding a rich variety of evidence, including architecture and literature but unfortunately for many people Jordan begins and ends with the magical ancient Nabataean city of Petra. And it's true, Petra is without doubt one of the Middle East's most spectacular, unmissable sights, battling it out with Machu Picchu or Angkor Wat for the title of the worlds most dramatic 'lost city'.

Yet there's so much more to see in Jordan - ruined Roman cities, Crusader castles, desert citadels and powerful biblical sites: the brook where Jesus was baptised, the fortress where Herod beheaded John the Baptist, and the mountain top where Moses cast eyes on the Promised Land. Biblical scenes are not just consigned to the past in Jordan; you'll see plenty of men wearing full-flowing robes and leading herds of livestock across the timeless desert. But it's not all crusty ruins. Jordan's capital Amman is a modern, culturally diverse Arab city which is light years away from the typical clichés of Middle Eastern exoticism. The country also offers some of the wildest adventures in the region, as well as an incredibly varied backdrop ranging from the red desert sands of Wadi Rum to the brilliant blues of the coral-filled Gulf of Aqaba; from rich palm-filled wadis to the lifeless Dead Sea. Ultimately it's the sensual delights of daily life in the Middle East that you'll hanker for longest after you return home; the bittersweet taste of cardamom coffee or the smell of a richly scented nargileh (water pipe); the intoxicating swirl of Arabic pop sliding out of an Amman doorway and the deafening silence of the desert. Jordanians are a passionate and proud people and the country truly welcomes visitors with open arms. Despite being squeezed between the hotspots of Iraq, Saudi Arabia and Israel & the Palestinian Territories, Jordan is probably the safest and most stable country in the region. Regardless of your nationality, you'll be greeted with nothing but courtesy and hospitality in this gem of a country.

Jihad Salamein

Share your knowledge

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