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Wikitravel:Discover

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Revision as of 23:38, 7 September 2009 by Bill-on-the-Hill (Talk | contribs)

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Discover is Wikitravel's heading for strange but true trivia about destinations and events.

Criteria

  • Keep it short and snappy: no more than twenty words, please.
  • [[Link]] any place names.
  • '''Boldface''' the fact of interest.
  • The articles don't need to be perfect, but preference should be given to those with a status of "usable" or higher.
  • The article linked to must contain the fact in question.
  • Relevant images are optional but welcome, ideally once for every three facts. They should be placed above the fact in question, with the following formatting:
[[Image:imagename|right|100px|description]]
The interesting fact linked to this image goes here.

Now displayed

800px-Cuba yank tank.jpg



This selection, as presented by Template:Discover, is updated every day automatically by DiscoverBot at 01:00 EDT, at least when the bot works (it isn't working as of March 2009). Please don't edit the template directly. Older entries can be found in the archive.

Last updated on 04 Nov 2008 01:00:09

Upcoming

Add your entries to the end of this list. The list is read by an automated bot, which simply reads lines off the top, so please do not leave any space or other commentary between entries. However, feel free to rearrange the list, because geographic variety in what's displayed is good (e.g. if the next three items are all from Asia, it's good to intersperse something from Africa, Europe or the Americas).


  • Jefferson City, Missouri houses the only museum in the United States devoted specifically to veterinary medicine.
  • For avid runners, the summer festival in Dunedin, New Zealand hosts a race up Baldwin Street, the world's steepest street.
  • At Tokyu Hands in Shinjuku, Tokyo, you can buy — among many, many other things — a dozen types of sand for model railways.
  • The Hotel Paisano in Marfa, Texas shows the James Dean film Giant in a screening room off its lobby all day, seven days a week.
  • Legend has it that the city of Ljubljana was established by Jason and the Argonauts with Jason himself as the city's first citizen.
  • You're welcome to have as much as you like, but the Emperor of Japan is legally barred from eating Shimonoseki's most famous dish, fugu, the poisonous pufferfish.
  • With a length of 800 meters, Hilversum has the largest wildlife crossing of the world.
  • Among the attractions at Frederik Meijer Gardens and Sculpture Park in Grand Rapids, Michigan is "Leonardo's Horse," a finished interpretation of the giant sculpture da Vinci intended to be his masterpiece.
  • Mitsukoshi, Japan's 325-year-old retailer, has only one North American location—and it's inside the Epcot theme park at Walt Disney World.
  • With more than 7,300 kilometers, the tiny European country Denmark has a longer coastline and more beaches than the subcontinent of India.
  • Despite being famed as the Marble City, Kilkenny's black marble is in fact a finely grained carboniferous limestone.

On hold

The articles linked in from the entries below need to be improved before they're ready to go. Plunge forward, edit them, and move to the main queue. If you move trivia to this list, please provide a reason for doing so.

  • The town of Kristinestad, Finland has a road called Kattpiskargränden, which means Cat Spanker Alley.
  • By tradition, the sand spit of Amanohashidate, one of Japan's Three Views, is best viewed upside down from between your legs. (de-outline)
  • Northern Kentucky is home to the Creation Museum, which teaches the Book of Genesis as literal truth. (de-outline)
  • The name of the Japanese town of Shiojiri means "Salt Butt". (destub)
  • Mt. Angel recently built the largest glockenspiel in the United States. Also hosts a Bavarian-style "Oktoberfest" complete with traditional German bands every September (de-outline, wait for September, 2008 dates are Sep.11-14)
  • A street in Lancaster, California was modified for a Honda commercial so that all cars driving over it at 55 miles per hour would hear the William Tell Overture due to grooves cut in the road.

The following calendar-related items are "ready-to-go" criteria-wise and should be moved to the main queue at a date appropriate to the trivia featured:

  • Menton Fête du Citron: There's a lemon party and you're invited! Lemon-related festivities over several days in February. (wait for Feb)

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