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User talk:Ypsilon

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Revision as of 09:09, 19 August 2012 by Ypsilon (Talk | contribs)

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Hello!

Welcome to Wikitravel. You can edit your preferences to change how the software works for you. Please take a second to look at our copyleft and policies and guidelines, but feel free to plunge forward and edit some pages. Scanning the Manual of style, especially the article templates, can give you a good idea of how we like articles formatted. If you're new to our wiki software, MediaWiki, look at the Wiki markup to get an idea of how to edit a page. If you need help, check out the help desk, and if you need some info not on there, post a message in the travellers' pub.

If you have any questions feel free to ask. -- Sapphire 06:47, 22 November 2006 (EST)

Discover

Hey! Thanks for adding discoveries to the Discover page, but would you mind trying to post a greater variety of discovery types? What I mean is, the page currently has way too many discoveries about the first or X-est (tallest, oldest, largest, etc.) and the featured 3 should preferably not have more than one of these types featured at the same time. Because there are SO many, though, it is becoming very difficult to update accordingly, especially with all of the other criteria (geographical diversity, images, and making sure the discoveries are not too close (or from the same country as) the DotM/OtBP.

Here are some examples of discoveries that do NOT highlight the first or X-est:

  • The beautiful frescoes in Istanbul's Chora Church were lost under plaster for over 500 years before being uncovered.
  • Legend has it that the legendary Ark of the Covenant is held inside the Church of St. Mary of Zion in Axum, Ethiopia.
  • Lake Retba near Dakar is a famous naturally pink lake, gaining its color from the algae that live in it.
  • The Sacred Garbage Pile, Aitan Ola, in Kétou came into existence when locals were asked to place objects atop the sacred site, and they gathered whatever they could find; Namely garbage.
  • China's Leaning Tower, Huqiu Tower in Suzhou predates Pisa's Leaning Tower by over 200 years.
  • For spiritual travelers, you'll find the Gateway to God in Haridwar, India, while the Gateway to Hell is on Mount Osore in Japan.
  • Legend has it, Suyumbike Tower in Kazan is name after a Tatar Princess who committed suicide by jumping off it in order to avoid marriage to Ivan the Terrible.

If you find things like these that would make good discoveries, please disperse them between the other Discoveries to keep them fresh and diverse. ChubbyWimbus 12:25, 7 March 2011 (EST)


Hello! Yes, it would look strange to have just one superlative after another in the Discover section. I haven't actually thought about that before, seriously, and when I'm browsing the articles for something to add I somehow manage to find something that is older, bigger, deeper etc. than anything else in the world or country. And, the people who have added the items in the middle of the current list also seem to have found similar stuff (largest tree, stone arch, first capitol). It looks like your Discoveries are from the archive, for now I'll add those that are from 2009 plus some other interesting facts that I have found in the articles.

Ypsilon 03:46, 16 March 2011 (EDT)

Amsterdam picture

I saw you placed a picture of Amsterdam in the Wikitravel:Discover section. It looks good, but as the "fun fact" is about bicycles, you might want to consider this image [1] that shows a bicycle in Amsterdam :) --globe-trotter 20:59, 5 September 2011 (EDT)

Looks excellent, and it seems like somebody already changed it. Ypsilon 07:39, 12 September 2011 (EDT)

Vietnam visum?

Please see http://wikitravel.org/en/Wikitravel:Travellers%27_pub#Cache_rebuilding_today at the bottom, where a user named Vietnam visum is identifying him/herself as you. Is this you?--IBobi talk email 15:01, 16 August 2012 (EDT)

Yes. Ypsilon 05:05, 19 August 2012 (EDT)

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