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Difference between revisions of "User:Serishmus/RegionTest"

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(Districts)
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==Districts==
  
 
{{Regionlist
 
{{Regionlist
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| region8items=
 
| region8items=
 
| region8description=On a peninsula across Boston Harbor from the main bulk of the city and the location of '''Logan Airport'''. Several underwater tunnels connect East Boston to the rest of the city. Large Latin American population.
 
| region8description=On a peninsula across Boston Harbor from the main bulk of the city and the location of '''Logan Airport'''. Several underwater tunnels connect East Boston to the rest of the city. Large Latin American population.
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 +
| region9name=[[Boston/Allston-Brighton|Allston]] and [[Boston/Allston-Brighton|Brighton]] (Allston-Brighton)
 +
| region9color=#d56d76
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| region9items=
 +
| region9description=Located west of Boston proper, these districts (especially Brighton) are primarily residential, and are home to many students and young professionals. Brighton is abutted Boston College, which is the terminus of the Green Line's B Branch. The border between the two is a fuzzy subject of debate, so they are often considered as one neighborhood by outsiders.
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| region10name=[[Boston/Back Bay|Back Bay]]
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| region10color=#d7a35a
 +
| region10items=
 +
| region10description=This '''upscale area of Boston''' has fine shops, fine dining, as well as sites such as the Prudential Center, Copley Square, and Hynes Convention Center.
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 +
| region11name=[[Boston/Beacon Hill|Beacon Hill]]
 +
| region11color=#d5dc76
 +
| region11items=
 +
| region11description=Once the neighborhood of the Boston Brahmins. Beacon Hill has real gas-lit street lanterns on many of the streets, as well as many original bricks dating back to age of the city itself. Because the Massachusetts State House is located here, "Beacon Hill" is often used as a metonym to refer to the state government or the legislature.
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| region12name=[[Boston/Charlestown|Charlestown]]
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| region12color=#80bb89
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| region12items=
 +
| region12description=Across the Charles River to the north, this is the site of the '''Bunker Hill Monument'''.
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 +
| region13name=[[Boston/Chinatown|Chinatown]]
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| region13color=#4da9c4
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| region13items=
 +
| region13description=Great Asian food, great herbalists and next to downtown and the theater district. 4th largest Chinatown in the United States.
 +
 +
| region14name=[[Boston/Dorchester|Dorchester]] ("Dot")
 +
| region14color=#c68d98
 +
| region14items=
 +
| region14description=A large working class neighborhood often considered Boston's most diverse. It includes the '''JFK Library''', UMass Boston, and many wonderful eateries.
 +
 +
| region15name=[[Boston/Allston-Brighton|Allston]] and [[Boston/Allston-Brighton|Brighton]] (Allston-Brighton)
 +
| region15color=#d56d76
 +
| region15items=
 +
| region15description=Located west of Boston proper, these districts (especially Brighton) are primarily residential, and are home to many students and young professionals. Brighton is abutted Boston College, which is the terminus of the Green Line's B Branch. The border between the two is a fuzzy subject of debate, so they are often considered as one neighborhood by outsiders.
 +
 +
| region16name=[[Boston/Back Bay|Back Bay]]
 +
| region16color=#d7a35a
 +
| region16items=
 +
| region16description=This '''upscale area of Boston''' has fine shops, fine dining, as well as sites such as the Prudential Center, Copley Square, and Hynes Convention Center.
 +
 +
| region17name=[[Boston/Beacon Hill|Beacon Hill]]
 +
| region17color=#d5dc76
 +
| region17items=
 +
| region17description=Once the neighborhood of the Boston Brahmins. Beacon Hill has real gas-lit street lanterns on many of the streets, as well as many original bricks dating back to age of the city itself. Because the Massachusetts State House is located here, "Beacon Hill" is often used as a metonym to refer to the state government or the legislature.
 +
 +
| region18name=[[Boston/Charlestown|Charlestown]]
 +
| region18color=#80bb89
 +
| region18items=
 +
| region18description=Across the Charles River to the north, this is the site of the '''Bunker Hill Monument'''.
 +
 +
| region19name=[[Boston/Chinatown|Chinatown]]
 +
| region19color=#4da9c4
 +
| region19items=
 +
| region19description=Great Asian food, great herbalists and next to downtown and the theater district. 4th largest Chinatown in the United States.
 +
 +
| region20name=[[Boston/Dorchester|Dorchester]] ("Dot")
 +
| region20color=#c68d98
 +
| region20items=
 +
| region20description=A large working class neighborhood often considered Boston's most diverse. It includes the '''JFK Library''', UMass Boston, and many wonderful eateries.
  
 
}}
 
}}

Revision as of 23:34, 31 May 2011

Hi!

Districts

Downtown
The central business district of the city of Los Angeles, Downtown is also home to the city's Grand Avenue cultural corridor. Like many city centers, the advent of the automobile and freeways led to the neighborhood's slow decline. However, in recent years, the area has seen a booming revival led by new residential buildings, with trendy hotels, bars, shops and restaurants.
Eastside
A funkier area north of downtown and east of Hollywood that's rapidly gentrifying.
Harbor Area
Home of the largest sea port in the States, and the launching point for trips to Catalina Island.
Hollywood
The place where movies are made. It has received quite a makeover in recent years, sparked by the construction of Hollywood & Highland and the return of the Academy Awards.
San Fernando Valley
The northern suburban portion of Los Angeles, lying in a valley northwest of downtown, containing various districts.
South Central
It's long had a reputation for gang violence and is famed for the Rodney King riots, but while it remains off most peoples radar, there are a handful of things to see and it's slowly working to repair its bruised image.
Westside
Generally more affluent area of town near the ocean
Wilshire
Home of the historic architecture of the Miracle Mile District, the Farmer's Market and The Grove shopping areas, the Los Angeles County Museum of Art, CBS Television City, and the famous La Brea Tar Pits.

Districts

Allston and Brighton (Allston-Brighton)
Located west of Boston proper, these districts (especially Brighton) are primarily residential, and are home to many students and young professionals. Brighton is abutted Boston College, which is the terminus of the Green Line's B Branch. The border between the two is a fuzzy subject of debate, so they are often considered as one neighborhood by outsiders.
Back Bay
This upscale area of Boston has fine shops, fine dining, as well as sites such as the Prudential Center, Copley Square, and Hynes Convention Center.
Beacon Hill
Once the neighborhood of the Boston Brahmins. Beacon Hill has real gas-lit street lanterns on many of the streets, as well as many original bricks dating back to age of the city itself. Because the Massachusetts State House is located here, "Beacon Hill" is often used as a metonym to refer to the state government or the legislature.
Charlestown
Across the Charles River to the north, this is the site of the Bunker Hill Monument.
Chinatown
Great Asian food, great herbalists and next to downtown and the theater district. 4th largest Chinatown in the United States.
Dorchester ("Dot")
A large working class neighborhood often considered Boston's most diverse. It includes the JFK Library, UMass Boston, and many wonderful eateries.
Downtown
This is the hub of tourist activity with Faneuil Hall, the Freedom Trail, Boston Public Garden, and Boston Common. It is also the center of city and state governments, businesses, and shopping.
East Boston (Eastie)
On a peninsula across Boston Harbor from the main bulk of the city and the location of Logan Airport. Several underwater tunnels connect East Boston to the rest of the city. Large Latin American population.
Allston and Brighton (Allston-Brighton)
Located west of Boston proper, these districts (especially Brighton) are primarily residential, and are home to many students and young professionals. Brighton is abutted Boston College, which is the terminus of the Green Line's B Branch. The border between the two is a fuzzy subject of debate, so they are often considered as one neighborhood by outsiders.
Back Bay
This upscale area of Boston has fine shops, fine dining, as well as sites such as the Prudential Center, Copley Square, and Hynes Convention Center.
Beacon Hill
Once the neighborhood of the Boston Brahmins. Beacon Hill has real gas-lit street lanterns on many of the streets, as well as many original bricks dating back to age of the city itself. Because the Massachusetts State House is located here, "Beacon Hill" is often used as a metonym to refer to the state government or the legislature.
Charlestown
Across the Charles River to the north, this is the site of the Bunker Hill Monument.
Chinatown
Great Asian food, great herbalists and next to downtown and the theater district. 4th largest Chinatown in the United States.
Dorchester ("Dot")
A large working class neighborhood often considered Boston's most diverse. It includes the JFK Library, UMass Boston, and many wonderful eateries.
Allston and Brighton (Allston-Brighton)
Located west of Boston proper, these districts (especially Brighton) are primarily residential, and are home to many students and young professionals. Brighton is abutted Boston College, which is the terminus of the Green Line's B Branch. The border between the two is a fuzzy subject of debate, so they are often considered as one neighborhood by outsiders.
Back Bay
This upscale area of Boston has fine shops, fine dining, as well as sites such as the Prudential Center, Copley Square, and Hynes Convention Center.
Beacon Hill
Once the neighborhood of the Boston Brahmins. Beacon Hill has real gas-lit street lanterns on many of the streets, as well as many original bricks dating back to age of the city itself. Because the Massachusetts State House is located here, "Beacon Hill" is often used as a metonym to refer to the state government or the legislature.
Charlestown
Across the Charles River to the north, this is the site of the Bunker Hill Monument.
Chinatown
Great Asian food, great herbalists and next to downtown and the theater district. 4th largest Chinatown in the United States.
Dorchester ("Dot")
A large working class neighborhood often considered Boston's most diverse. It includes the JFK Library, UMass Boston, and many wonderful eateries.

Districts

Neighborhood nicknames are in (parentheses).

The skyline of Boston's Financial District
  • Allston and Brighton (Allston-Brighton) - Located west of Boston proper, these districts (especially Brighton) are primarily residential, and are home to many students and young professionals. Brighton is abutted Boston College, which is the terminus of the Green Line's B Branch. The border between the two is a fuzzy subject of debate, so they are often considered as one neighborhood by outsiders.
  • Back Bay - This upscale area of Boston has fine shops, fine dining, as well as sites such as the Prudential Center, Copley Square, and Hynes Convention Center.
  • Beacon Hill - Once the neighborhood of the Boston Brahmins. Beacon Hill has real gas-lit street lanterns on many of the streets, as well as many original bricks dating back to age of the city itself. Because the Massachusetts State House is located here, "Beacon Hill" is often used as a metonym to refer to the state government or the legislature.
  • Charlestown - Across the Charles River to the north, this is the site of the Bunker Hill Monument.
  • Chinatown - Great Asian food, great herbalists and next to downtown and the theater district. 4th largest Chinatown in the United States.
  • Dorchester ("Dot") - A large working class neighborhood often considered Boston's most diverse. It includes the JFK Library, UMass Boston, and many wonderful eateries.
  • Downtown - This is the hub of tourist activity with Faneuil Hall, the Freedom Trail, Boston Public Garden, and Boston Common. It is also the center of city and state governments, businesses, and shopping.
  • East Boston (Eastie) - On a peninsula across Boston Harbor from the main bulk of the city and the location of Logan Airport. Several underwater tunnels connect East Boston to the rest of the city. Large Latin American population.
  • Fenway-Kenmore (The Fens, Kenmore Square) - Fenway Park is the home of the 2004 and 2007 world champion Boston Red Sox.
  • Financial District - Boston's business and financial center, this area has plenty of restaurants, bars, and tourist attractions such as the New England Aquarium.
  • Hyde Park (HP) - The southernmost neighborhood in Boston, with suburban characteristics.
  • Jamaica Plain (JP) - A diverse residential neighborhood and home to Samuel Adams Brewery.
  • Mattapan - A residential neighborhood that is home to the city's large Caribbean population.
  • Mission Hill - A residential neighborhood, with a very high student population.
  • North End - the city's Italian neighborhood with excellent restaurants. It is also the location of the Old North Church.
  • Roslindale (Rozzie) - Residential neighborhood, also a large Greek population.
  • Roxbury (Rox,The Bury) - The historical center of Boston's black community.
  • South Boston (Southie) - this is a proud residential neighborhood with a waterfront district and the Boston Convention and Exhibition Center on its north side. Home to one of the largest Irish and Irish American populations in the country.
  • South End - just south of Back Bay, has Victorian brownstones and a bohemian atmosphere. Large Gay population.
  • West Roxbury (Westie, West Rox) - with mostly single family homes, West Roxbury has a suburban feel in an urban setting.

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