Help Wikitravel grow by contributing to an article! Learn how.

Talk:Swiss-German phrasebook

From Wikitravel
Revision as of 22:35, 7 February 2011 by 193.135.144.67 (Talk)

(diff) ← Older revision | Latest revision (diff) | Newer revision → (diff)
Jump to: navigation, search

What is the sense in developing a swiss-german phrasebook? In switzerland you will be considered to make fun of them if you try to talk this language. Talk the normal German or English which is spoken by nearly everyone.

It's handy for understanding what people are saying. My cousin translates German for a living, and she had problems comphrehending the locals the first time she visited Zurich! Jpatokal 00:02, 13 June 2007 (EDT)

Written German and what is officially spoken in Germany is a foreign language to all Swiss, even the people in the "German"-speaking part of switzerland. Historically, we still speak "Alt Hochdeutsch", whereas in Germany "Neu Hochdeutsch" is spoken except for Southern Germany (Schwäbisch) and Bundesland Bayern (Bayrisch). Swiss kids who have not learnt written German in school don't understand a word of what is spoken on tv. Our mother tongue and thus all emotional information ist in the dialect of the state we grew up in. We dream and curse in that dialect. There has never been a Swiss saying "ich liebe dich". During our education we gradually start understanding the dialects of the other dialects of the 26 states (Kantone). Most Swiss have a hard time understanding traditional dialects from Thurgau, Bern, Appenzell and especially what is spoken in the Wallis. Pedro, born and raised in Switzerland

Rösti[edit]

That should be fried grated potatoes, not fried mashed right?

Variants

Actions

Destination Docents

In other languages