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Revision as of 17:36, 22 March 2013 by (Talk)

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Public Transport[edit]

Make some changes in price of public transport and taxi services throw my recent experience. Please contribute more detailed in order to make the use of public transport and especially buses more friendly to the tourists.--Dimitrish81 04:10, 12 December 2012 (EST)

Camel jockey[edit]

The term "camel jockey" took me aback, as it's a racist slur in the US for Arabs and other Middle-Easterners. Is it the common term for "somebody who rents camels"? If so, please revert. --Evan 14:54, 19 Nov 2005 (EST)

You norteamericanos are weird. A horse jockey is a guy who rides a horse and a camel jockey is a guy who rides a camel; I'd wager to guess that most of the ones in Petra (or any Middle Eastern tourist destination) don't own their camels. For what it's worth, a Google search for "camel jockey" finds lots of articles about, well, camel jockeys, notably the underaged kids forced to ride them in races. Jpatokal 21:48, 20 Nov 2005 (EST)

Student ID[edit]

Under the see section it is stated that students will get in for 11.5 JD. I was recently there (last week) and we were told that this was only applicable for Jordanian students, not foriegn students. This may be because we were in the off season, however, does anyone know where to check this out? Kdune 13:14, 18 December 2006 (EST)

I'm not sure, since my student IDs have alway been for Jordanian institutions. I'm actually surprised that they checked it with more than a glance. If you had visited on another day, the reaction probably would have been different. - Cybjorg 06:59, 6 February 2007 (EST)

You don't get any discount with student ID in petra.

Border taxi mafia update[edit]

The reason given for deleting this part was "it has nothing to do with Petra tourism". Nevertheless, it has everything to do with getting to Petra from Eilat if you are on your own. I find the deleted section accurate -- the man insists on speaking only to him, claiming "he organises all transport here" and seems to be in very good relations with border guards. Currently (Feb 2013) there are even "official" signs at the border claiming one-way taxi to Petra is 54 JD and there seem to be no taxis operating independently of this guy. - jh 11:26, 21 February 2013 (CET)

Using 459 words of this article to complain about a potential issue that is only relevant to lone travellers coming from Eilat (who represent less than 1% of Petra visitors) is ridiculous. I understand that your experiences have been frustrating, but that is no reason to fill this article with information that is irrelevant to the vast majority of readers - especially when you are just copying and pasting information that is already contained in the article Aqaba#Get_in. 12:08, 22 March 2013 (EDT)
I already reduced the section to:
Aqaba/Eilat Border Issues - There can be some problems for lone travellers crossing the Eilat/Aqaba border - for more information see Aqaba#Eilat_Border_Taxi_Mafia.}}
But, after some thought, I still disagree that the information is relevant to this article - it's like including information about potential problems crossing the Mexican border in the article on the Grand Canyon. It just doesn't make sense. Yes, there can be problems crossing borders, and that should be mentioned in the article on that country, but not in an article about a tourist attraction within a country. 13:32, 22 March 2013 (EDT)



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