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Talk:List of country calling codes

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Is this going to be usefull? I mean, is anyone going to want all the codes at once vs each code on the country page? Just thinking this might be a slippery slope toward phone-book-ness. Majnoona

At least until that information is on all the country pages, I think this is a valuable resource. - Todd VerBeek 10:48, 7 June 2006 (EDT)

Prefixes absent here[edit]

Don’t you think this article should also include what prefix should be dialled prior to country calling code when making international calls (for example 011 in the USA or 00 in most of Europe). It doesn’t matter for a traveller the code of the country in which s/he is, but what really matters, I think, is what s/he must dial prior to the country code when calling home (or when calling to book a train ticket or a bed in a hostel in his/her next destination which is a neighbouring country). A list of country codes is much easier than to find a list of prefixes used for international phone calls, and the country code is given within the local number almost all times anyway, but starting with a “+” which should be replaced with a number/set of numbers which this article covers no information about (though it’s very nice to have handy calling codes list gathered as a whole at Wikitravel). Looking up to the specific country article doesn’t always help, for example Iran article (under contact/telephone) has a list of the telephone codes for the important centres in the country but doesn’t give any clue about what should be dialed first for an international call. If there is a seperate article on this, please create a link on the top or end of this article and ignore my suggestion.

Also can we consider adding the codes of unrecognized “countries” like Transnistria, Northern Cyprus or Nagorno-Karabakh? It may not satisfy the title which reads “list of country calling codes”, but so neither does American Samoa, Aruba or British Virgin Islands. (or are they officially called a “country”?) Codes of unrecognized countries may be listed under the name of the country which they are internationally considered a part of (Transnistria under Moldova, Northern Cyprus under Cyprus, Nagorno-Karabakh under Azerbaijan); but then comes the problems about whether to list Taiwan under China/New Caledonia under France or not. To avoid any problems they may be listed twice, once with the alphabetical order of their name (Transnistria between Tonga and Trinidad & Tobago) and once again with the country they are related to (Transnistria under Moldova, hence between Moldova and Monaco). I can’t estimate how this effects “the traveller comes first” principle. --81.212.45.56 15:48, 30 May 2007 (EDT)

That kind of information is (or at least should be) included in the individual country (or de-facto-country) articles. A separate article would seem to just separate that information from the articles where it's most useful (kind of like this article would do.... if it weren't redundant). - Todd VerBeek 17:40, 30 May 2007 (EDT)

Changes[edit]

Here are the recent changes I have made:

  • American Samoa is now a part of the North American Numbering Plan (NANP); see this document from the folks who are in charge of the NANP.
  • The French island of Mayotte has changes its code to 262 (same as Reunion); see Greenwich Mean Time for details.
  • St. Barthelemy and French St. Martin now have a new status as "overseas collectivities" (see the CIA Factbook profiles on St. Barthelemy or St. Martin for details). They have been added to the list for completeness since they use the same code as Guadeloupe.

Hope this helps. Hoshie 16:06, 8 February 2008 (EST)

Fix[edit]

American Samoa, Guam, & Puerto Rico are parts of the US (and all share "1" calling code), so I have removed them. AHeneen 14:40, 9 January 2009 (EST)

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