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Difference between revisions of "Rocky Mountaineer"

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While you can travel the north route on a standard VIArail train, it traverses much of the area in the evening/night, so you can't see a whole lot out of the windows. The Rocky Mountaineer is specially timed to travel only during the daylight hours, so you can see a whole lot more.  
 
While you can travel the north route on a standard VIArail train, it traverses much of the area in the evening/night, so you can't see a whole lot out of the windows. The Rocky Mountaineer is specially timed to travel only during the daylight hours, so you can see a whole lot more.  
  
The Rocky Mountaineer is actually two trains - it travels from [[Vancouver]] to [[Kamloops]] the first day, through fairly pastoral country with a lot of lakes, which changes to a much drier desert-type region as you approach Kamloops. The second day the train splits into two segments, the first half travelling to [[Jasper]] on the northern track, while the remainder of the train goes south to [[Banff]]. The southern route has recently been extended and it is possible to continue to [[Calgary]] on the same train.
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The Rocky Mountaineer is actually two trains - it travels from [[Vancouver]] to [[Kamloops]] the first day, through fairly pastoral country with a lot of lakes, which changes to a much drier desert-type region as you approach Kamloops. The second day the train splits into two segments, the first half travelling to [[Jasper]] on the northern track, while the remainder of the train goes south to [[Banff]]. The southern route has recently been extended and it is possible to continue to [[Calgary]] on the same train. The trip also runs in reverse, as the trains go back and forth several times a week.

Revision as of 00:49, 8 August 2003

If you want to see the Canadian Rockies in style, you can't get better than the Rocky Mountaineer tourist train. This train takes you through the heart of the Canadian Rockies, offering two levels of service - redleaf and goldleaf. Redleaf includes a seat in a standard train carriage and cold meals served at your seat. Goldleaf passengers travel in a domed car, with a special dining room for each carriage where you are served gourmet meals (such as scrambled eggs with smoked salmon, and lobster eggs benedict for breakfast.) Access to the goldleaf carriages is via a spiral staircase which could offer a problem for the disabled or frail. I couldn't see any way for a disabled person to get upstairs, but the carriage has a disabled toilet downstairs so I guess there must be SOME way to manage it! The Redleaf cars are a standard train carriage.

While you can travel the north route on a standard VIArail train, it traverses much of the area in the evening/night, so you can't see a whole lot out of the windows. The Rocky Mountaineer is specially timed to travel only during the daylight hours, so you can see a whole lot more.

The Rocky Mountaineer is actually two trains - it travels from Vancouver to Kamloops the first day, through fairly pastoral country with a lot of lakes, which changes to a much drier desert-type region as you approach Kamloops. The second day the train splits into two segments, the first half travelling to Jasper on the northern track, while the remainder of the train goes south to Banff. The southern route has recently been extended and it is possible to continue to Calgary on the same train. The trip also runs in reverse, as the trains go back and forth several times a week.

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