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Mount Pulag National Park

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Luzon : Cordillera Administrative Region : Mount Pulag National Park
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View from Mt. Pulag

Mount Pulag (or sometimes Mount Pulog) is the third highest mountain in the Philippines. It is Luzon’s highest peak at 2,922 meters above sea level. The borders between the provinces of Benguet, Ifugao, and Nueva Vizcaya meet at the mountain's peak

Understand

It is the third highest mountain in the Philippines, after Mount Apo and Mount Dulang-Dulang.

History

On February 20, 1987, a large part of the mountain was designated as a National Park with Proclamation No. 75. This act aims to preserve the environment around the mountain due to threats from increased development such as conversion to agricultural lands, timber production, hunting, and increased tourism.

The National Park is inhabited by different tribes such as the Ibalois, Kalanguya, Kankana-eys, Karao, Ifugaos and the Ilocanos. The indigenous people of Benguet consider the mountain to be a sacred place.

Landscape

Flora and fauna

The mountain hosts 528 documented plant species. It is the natural habitat of the endemic Dwarf Bamboo, (Yushania niitakayamensis) and the Benguet pine (Pinus insularis) which dominates the areas of Luzon tropical pine forests found on the mountainside. Among its native wildlife are 33 bird species and several threatened mammals such as the Philippine Deer, Giant Bushy-Tailed Cloud Rat (“bowet”) and the Long-Haired Fruit Bat. Mount Pulag is the only place that hosts the 4 Cloud Rat species. It has one of the most diverse biodiversity of the Philippines, with the newly found (since 1896) 185 grams Dwarf cloud rat, Carpomys melanurus, a rare breed (endemic to the Cordillera) and the Koch pitta bird among its endangered denizens.

Climate

Because of its high elevation, the climate on Mount Pulag is temperate with rains predominating the whole year. Rainfall on the mountain averages 4,489 mm yearly with August being the wettest month with an average rainfall of 1,135 mm. Snow has not fallen on its top in at least the past 100 years.

At nighttime, temperatures can reach near-freezing levels.

Get in

It is possible to make arrangements for jeepneys from Baguio to take you directly to the Badabak Ranger Station. This significantly cuts climbing time, and it makes possible a 2-day Pulag climb.

The most convenient way to climb Mt. Pulag is by joining the monthly trips of Trail Adventours, Inc. (info@trailadventours.com), a Manila-based adventure-service provider. Trips are reasonably 3,800 Philippine Pesos (approximately 87 USD) per person inclusive of transportation from Manila. Run by mountaineers, the service is well-organized and organizers even serve coffee at the summit. Although they mainly offer the Ambangeg Trail, they also sometimes offer Akiki-Ambangeg trips.

Fees/Permits

The national park is open throughout the year. A permit is necessary and can be obtained on-site.

Get around

See

The summit views of Pulag are breath-taking. On a blessed time, seas of clouds form beneath, covering everything but the highest points in the Cordilleras.

Do

As the highest mountain in Luzon, Mount Pulag attracts a lot of mountain climbers. Highlights of the climb include the montane forests and the grassland summit with its "sea of clouds" phenomenon. There are four major trails up the summit: the Ambangeg, Akiki, and Tawangan trails from Benguet and the Ambaguio trail from Nueva Vizcaya. These trails are managed by the Mount Pulag National Park, under the Department of Environment and Natural Resources.

Depending on the trail, a climb may take 1–4 days, with the easiest being the Ambangeg trail. The difficulty level of the climb ranges from 3 to 7 out of 9 in the local classification system. No special equipment is required for the climb.


Buy

Eat

Drink

Sleep

Lodging

Camping

Hikers and their tents at Mt. Pulag

There are a few campsites to choose from: Camp 1 is still within the mossy forest area; in Camp 2 the grassland is just beginning (2600+ MASL). There is also another campsite which goes beyond the summit, on the way to the Akiki trail. This is the saddle campsite and is preferred by those who want close proximity to the summit. Camp 2 is the most advisable campsite, with a close water source, latrines (work in progress), nice views, and more manageable weather conditions. However, the saddle campsite, being very the near the summit, takes you as close to the sky as possible. Either way, temperatures can plummet to near-freezing levels.

Backcountry

Stay safe

Get out

This article contains content from Wikipedia's Mount Pulag article. View that page's Pulag}}&action=history revision history for the list of authors.




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