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Mount Dalei

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China : East China : Zhejiang : Mount Dalei
Revision as of 13:20, 10 June 2010 by Globe-trotter (Talk | contribs)

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Mount Dalei is a mountain in the Tiantai Range of eastern China. Its peak reaches 809 metres above sea level.

Understand[edit]

Get in[edit]

  • Minibuses run from the Ningbo regularly. They also run from the regional towns of Xikou, and Fenghua. There are number of different approaches.

Get around[edit]

See[edit][add listing]

  • Mountain rodents and birds are common. In winter, larger animals, including wild boar, clouded leopard, wolves (locally called goji), and sometimes even oxen can be seen as they emerge to forage.
  • The mountain is home to the Xianling Temple, home of the local dragon king. The site sits on a natural spring. On the dragon king's birthday, tens of thousands descend (or ascend) on the temple to pray, and drink its waters, which are said to have medicinal purposes.
  • The communities on the mountain still cling to the old ways. Fine examples of traditional Chinese architecture are visible on the way, especially higher up. If you take some of the smaller paths, very likely you will bump into men harvesting bamboo. It's amazing how much weight 80-year-old men can carry on their backs.

Do[edit][add listing]

  • The hike up to the peak takes about half a day. Centuries old routes are available until near the top, where they have fallen into misuse. The mountain paths are, however, confusing at times, and it is important to maintain a good sense of direction. The peak is actually a broad grassy plateau. It affords good views to the East China Sea, and north to Ningbo, on a clear day.

Buy[edit][add listing]

Eat[edit][add listing]

  • Bamboo, bamboo, bamboo! The mountain is full of all different kinds of bamboo shoots, which are prized in Chinese cuisine.
  • Local markets also sell a variety of mountain fare not generally available elsewhere. These include the meat of mountain rodents and wild boar, both very lean.

Drink[edit][add listing]

Sleep[edit][add listing]

Contact[edit]

Get out[edit]


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