Help Wikitravel grow by contributing to an article! Learn how.

Difference between revisions of "Middle East"

From Wikitravel
Asia : Middle East
Jump to: navigation, search
(Regions: removing Egypt -- we place it in North Africa)
(Regions: Turkey too--these are better explained in a short paragraph in this section, a la Balkans#Countries)
Line 17: Line 17:
 
* [[Saudi Arabia]]
 
* [[Saudi Arabia]]
 
* [[Syria]]
 
* [[Syria]]
* [[Turkey]]
 
 
* [[United Arab Emirates]]
 
* [[United Arab Emirates]]
 
* [[Yemen]]
 
* [[Yemen]]

Revision as of 22:56, 20 December 2009

Map of the Middle East

The Middle East is a world region in Western Asia and North-eastern Africa. The term was created by British military strategists in the 19th century, and definitions of the Middle East vary; it is not simply a geographical term, but also a political one, connoting that it separates Europe ("the West") from the Far East, and the traditional trade route of choice between these two extremes.

Contents

Regions

Cities

Other destinations

Understand

As one of the wellsprings of human civilisation in the ancient and medieval worlds, the birthplace of several world religions (Judaism, Christianity, Islam and Bahai) and an area of much modern economic and political importance, the Middle East remains a popular destination for travellers.

Ethnically, the region is extremely mixed. Arabs, Jews, Persians and Turks are the largest groups, but there are several substantial minorities — Kurds, Armenians and others — with their own languages, customs and sometimes their own countries. Every invading army — from Alexander and the Romans through Genghis Khan to the 19th century colonial powers — has left descendants behind. There are also substantial numbers of workers from other countries coming to the region for higher pay — mainly Afghan, Pakistani for jobs like construction labourer, with Egyptians, Philipinos, more Pakistanis, and some westerners in the more skilled jobs.

Almost every country in the Middle East has a Muslim majority (with the notable exception of Israel which has a Jewish majority), with Iran, Iraq and Bahrain mainly Shia, other areas mainly Sunni, and both with minorities of the other — and the legal systems in most of these countries are influenced by Islamic Law; a few are entirely based on it.

Cultural geography

North Africa is similar to the Middle East in many ways — language, religion, culture and some ethnic groups. Some writers include Egypt, or even Sudan and Libya, in their use of the term "Middle East".

On the other side, Central Asia also has much in common with the Middle East. Ethnic groups and languages are different, but the religion, much of the food, clothing, and architecture are similar. Iran could be counted as part of either region; at one point most of Central Asia was part of the Persian Empire.

The border between southeastern Europe and the Middle East is also unclear. Many writers include Turkey in their usage of "Middle East" and we include it above, but Turkey is also very much a European country. Large parts of Turkey and all of Lebanon and Israel are also clearly Mediterranean regions. On the other hand, several countries usually considered European — Greece, Cyprus and to some extent the Balkans — also have Middle Eastern aspects to their culture.

Get in

By plane

The largest hub for flights in the region is Dubai, from where you can reach virtually any point in the Middle East. After Dubai, Doha, Abu Dhabi , Tehran and Istanbul are the ones with good intercontinental connections. Tel Aviv is served by flights from most Western countries, though due to the political situation, it is not possible to fly from there to anywhere in the Middle East besides Turkey, Egypt and Jordan. However, there are direct flights from large European hubs to most major cities in the region.

By boat

See Ferries in the Mediterranean.


Get around

See

Itineraries

Talk

Arabic is the primary language of the region, and the main language in all Middle Eastern countries except Iran (where Persian predominates), Turkey (Turkish) and Israel (Hebrew). Even in those countries, Arabic is fairly common as a second language; in Israel, Arabic is a second official language. Yiddish, Kurdish, Azeri, Armenian and several other languages are also spoken in some regions.

English is moderately common in tourist areas and generally rare elsewhere. In Turkey, some German is spoken because many Turks work in Germany.

Eat

A fancy Arabic mixed grill. Clockwise from top: lamb kofta, chicken shish tawuk, beef shish kebab, rozz (Arabic rice), vegetables.

Cookery provides obvious evidence of the extent of Middle Eastern influence. Turkish doner kebab, Greek gyros and the shawarma of the Arab countries (everywhere from Oman to Morocco) are all basically the same dish. A traveller going overland from Europe to India will find very similar dishes — notably flat breads and kebabs — in every country from Greece to India. These are also seen in Central Asia and even China. Many Greek dishes are closer to Iranian cooking than to Italian.

Stay safe

Planning a visit to the Middle East can be complicated in various ways:

  • Some countries and territories in the area, such as Iraq and the Gaza Strip, are in a state of war and should not be visited. See War zone safety if you must go.
  • Some countries, such as Saudi Arabia, do not issue tourist visas except for a few expensive tours.
  • Some countries in the region have strict Islamic Law, with heavy penalties for homosexuality, adultery and other offenses.
  • Many countries in the region do not recognize the state of Israel for many reasons. These nations may refuse you entry if you have an Israeli visa or an Israeli stamp in your passport, or even a visa for another country that was issued in Israel. The Israeli authorities will generally help you avoid these problems by providing a visa as a separate document so it is not in your passport, however now this has been discontinued; see the Israel article for details. Only Turkey, Egypt and Jordan have official relations with Israel.
  • For most of the area, suggestions in Tips for travel in developing countries apply




Variants

Actions

Destination Docents

In other languages

other sites