Help Wikitravel grow by contributing to an article! Learn how.

Difference between revisions of "Mexico City/Santa Fe"

From Wikitravel
Jump to: navigation, search
m (Get in)
(Drink)
 
(34 intermediate revisions by 17 users not shown)
Line 1: Line 1:
 
[[image:Santa_fe2mxc.jpg|thumb|200px|Calakmul building also known as ''La Lavadora'' (the washing machine)]]
 
[[image:Santa_fe2mxc.jpg|thumb|200px|Calakmul building also known as ''La Lavadora'' (the washing machine)]]
'''Santa Fe''' is in the northwestern area of [[Mexico City]].  It is the newest and most modern part of the city, as almost all of it has been developed only in the past twenty years; this puts this district in stark contrast with Mexico City's other districts, especially the [[Mexico City/Centro|Centro Historico]].  Many multinational and Mexican companies alike are headquartered here, with multi-million-dollar towers that scrape the sky.  
+
'''Santa Fe''' is in the western area of [[Mexico City]].  It is the newest and most modern district of the city, as almost all of it has been developed only in the past twenty years; this puts this district in stark contrast with Mexico City's other districts, especially the [[Mexico City/Centro|Centro Historico]].  Many multinational and Mexican companies alike are headquartered here, with multi-million-dollar towers that scrape the sky.  
  
 
==Understand==
 
==Understand==
Santa Fe was developed in the early 1990's on the remnants of an old landfill -- yes, a junk yard turned into a modern business district. The first institution to settle here was the Universidad Iberoamericana, a high-end institution for the local wealthy that saw its building collapse in the 1985 earthquake.  It wasn't until the early 2000's that Santa Fe gained attention as a well-developed business district, radically different from the rest of the city, because of its ultramodern architecture and contrasting wealth lifestyle signs.
+
Santa Fe was developed in the early 1990's on the remnants of an old landfill -- yes, a junk yard turned into a modern business district. It wasn't until the early 2000's that Santa Fe gained attention , radically different from the rest of the city, because of its ultramodern architecture and contrasting wealth lifestyle signs.
  
 
The paranoia that the local authorities have against photographers in Mexico City goes double for Santa Fe.  Guards will yell "no photo" at you, or even shoo you away from a building if you as so much approach with a camera, tripod or no.
 
The paranoia that the local authorities have against photographers in Mexico City goes double for Santa Fe.  Guards will yell "no photo" at you, or even shoo you away from a building if you as so much approach with a camera, tripod or no.
 +
This building is nicknamed, "The Washing Machine Building" (or "Lavandería").
  
 
==Get in==
 
==Get in==
  
Santa Fe is not served by the Metro, so the only ways into the area are by car, taxi or bus.  Cars and taxis are probably the fastest, but are certainly not the cheapest.  However, Santa Fe is served by Mexico City's RTP network and very frequently by ''pesero'' buses, which leave from Tacubaya station (Metro Lines 1, 7 and 9) and take around 30-45 minutes to get there.  Look for buses that say "Sta. Fe" in the window.
+
Santa Fe is not served by the Metro, so the only ways into the area are by car, taxi or bus.  Cars and taxis are probably the fastest, but are certainly not the cheapest.  However, Santa Fe is served by Mexico City's RTP network and much more frequently by ''pesero'' buses, which leave from Tacubaya station (Metro Lines 1, 7 and 9) and take around 30-45 minutes to get there.  Look for buses that say "Sta. Fe" in the window.
  
You will recognize instantly when you are in Santa Fe, when the two-lane road widens to lessen stop-and-go traffic and grand office buildings replace stucco shanties.  If you're on the bus, it will travel around the skyscrapers rather than go inbetween them; a good place to get off and look around is when the bus is on Avenida Vasco de Quiroga, or on the opposite end of the line of skyscrapers.  Don't wait too long though, because the bus continues onward into the residential area of the hills.
+
Another very convenient way to access Santa Fe is to use the new EcoBus 'Ruta Verde' which travels regularly from Metro Balderas to Santa Fe stopping at many Metro stops along Chapultepec Ave. The journey costs $5 and the buses are clean and modern.
 +
 
 +
You will recognize instantly when you are in Santa Fe, when the two-lane road widens to lessen stop-and-go traffic and grand office buildings replace stucco shanties.  If you're on a ''pesero'', it will travel around the skyscrapers rather than go inbetween them; a good place to get off and look around is when the bus is on Avenida Vasco de Quiroga, or on the opposite end of the line of skyscrapers.  Don't wait too long though, because the bus continues onward into the residential area of the hills.
  
 
==See==
 
==See==
Line 22: Line 25:
  
 
==Buy==
 
==Buy==
* '''Centro Santa Fe''' [http://www.centrosantafe.com.mx/] Located in avenida Vasco de Quiroga, it is the country's largest shopping center with more than 300 stores. Buy the unimaginable, from a t-shirt to a yacht. Anchor stores include Liverpool, El Palacio de Hierro and Sears. Other remarkable stores: French Connection, Mango, Zara, Massimo Dutti, Armani, Hugo Boss, Tous , Scappino, and many others.
 
The shopping center recently annnounced a 30,000 square meters expansion including more theaters and the first Saks Fifth Avenue store in Mexico.
 
  
* '''Zentrika''' Prolongación Vasco de Quiroga and Mario Pani street. Features an IMAX 3-D theater and a big food court.
+
*<buy name="Centro Santa Fe" alt="" address="Avenida Vasco de Quiroga" directions="" phone="" url="http://www.centrosantafe.com.mx/" hours="" price="" lat="" long="">This is the country's largest shopping center with more than 300 stores and a movie theater.  Buy the unimaginable, from a t-shirt to a yacht.  Anchor stores include Liverpool, El Palacio de Hierro, Sears and the first Saks Fifth Avenue in Mexico.  Other remarkable stores include French Connection, Mango, Zara, Massimo Dutti, Armani, Hugo Boss, Tous, Scappino,CHANEL and many others. </buy>
 +
 
 +
*<buy name="Zentrika" alt="" address="Prolongación Vasco de Quiroga and Mario Pani street" directions="" phone="" url="" hours="" price="" lat="" long="">Features an IMAX 3-D theater and a big food court.</buy>
  
 
==Eat==
 
==Eat==
* '''Los Canarios'''  Haute Mexican cuisine. Refined ambiance. Average price per person $200-350 pesos
+
 
* '''Guadiana''' Haute Mexican cuisine, refined ambiance. Average price per person $200-350 pesos
+
*<eat name="Los Canarios" alt="" address="" directions="" phone="" url="" hours="" price="$200-350" lat="" long="">Haute Mexican cuisine. Refined ambiance.</eat>
* '''Estoril Bistro''' Gonzalez Camarena 999 1A. Haute Mexican and International Food. Average price per person $350 pesos.
+
*<eat name="Guadiana" alt="" address="" directions="" phone="" url="" hours="" price="$200-350" lat="" long="">Haute Mexican cuisine, refined ambiance.</eat>
* '''Oaxa-K''' Oaxacan food. Inexpensive, great oaxacan food. Average price per person $100-150 pesos
+
*<eat name="Estoril Bistro" alt="" address="Gonzalez Camarena 999 1A" directions="" phone="" url="" hours="" price="$350" lat="" long="">Haute Mexican and International Food.</eat>
* '''Ruben's Hamburgers''' Mezquite charbroilled sirloin hamburgers. Average price per person $70-120 pesos
+
*<eat name="Oaxa-K" alt="" address="" directions="" phone="" url="" hours="" price="$100-150" lat="" long="">Inexpensive, great Oaxacan food.</eat>
* '''El Buen Bife''' Argentinian food. Average price per person $300-400 pesos
+
*<eat name="Ruben's Hamburgers" alt="" address="" directions="" phone="" url="" hours="" price="$70-120" lat="" long="">Mesquite charbroiled sirloin hamburgers.</eat>
* '''Taco Inn''' Tacos and Mexican food. Inexpensive great food. Average price per person $100-150 pesos
+
*<eat name="El Buen Bife" alt="" address="" directions="" phone="" url="" hours="" price="$300-400" lat="" long="">Argentinian food.</eat>
* '''La Buena Tierra''' Healthy food.Average price per person  $120 -170 pesos
+
*<eat name="Taco Inn" alt="" address="" directions="" phone="" url="" hours="" price="$100-150" lat="" long="">Tacos and Mexican food. Inexpensive great food.</eat>
* '''La Pergola di Roma''' International cuisine. Average price per person $150 - 250 pesos
+
*<eat name="La Buena Tierra" alt="" address="" directions="" phone="(55) 21.67.40.37" url="" hours="" price="$120-170" lat="" long="">Healthy food.</eat>
* '''Fisher's''' Sea food, refined ambiance. Average price per person $300 - 500 pesos
+
*<eat name="La Pergola di Roma" alt="" address="" directions="" phone="" url="" hours="" price="$150-250" lat="" long="">International cuisine.</eat>
* '''Chili's''' Branch of the american franchise. Average price per person $150 - 200 pesos
+
*<eat name="Fisher's" alt="" address="" directions="" phone="" url="" hours="" price="$300-500" lat="" long="">Sea food, refined ambiance.</eat>
* '''Starbuck's Cafe''' Just across Universidad Iberoamericana in Av. Vasco de Quiroga
+
*<eat name="Chili's" alt="" address="" directions="" phone="" url="" hours="" price="$150-200" lat="" long="">Branch of the American franchise.</eat>
  
 
==Drink==
 
==Drink==
* '''La Cantina'''
+
 
* '''Celtics''' Irish Pub
+
*<drink name="La Cantina" alt="" address="" directions="" phone="" url="" hours="" price="" lat="" long=""></drink>
 +
*<drink name="Big Yellow" alt="" address="" directions="" phone="" url="" hours="" price="" lat="" long=""></drink>
 +
*<drink name="King Bar" alt="" address="" directions="" phone="" url="" hours="" price="" lat="" long=""></drink>
  
 
==Sleep==
 
==Sleep==
* '''Sheraton Santa Fe'''
+
 
* '''Novotel Santa Fe'''
+
*<sleep name="Camino Real Santa Fe" alt="formerly Vesta" address="" directions="" phone="" url="" checkin="" checkout="" price="" lat="" long=""></sleep>
* '''Vesta Suites'''
+
*<sleep name="Distrito Capital" alt="" address="Juan Salvador Agraz #37" directions="" phone="52571300" url="http://www.hoteldistritocapital.com" checkin="15:00" checkout="12:00" price="" lat="" long=""></sleep>
* '''Fiesta Americana Santa Fe'''
+
*<sleep name="Fiesta Americana Santa Fe" alt="" address="" directions="" phone="(55) 11.05.50.00" url="" checkin="" checkout="" price="" lat="" long=""></sleep>
* '''Estadia Suites'''
+
*<sleep name="Haus Suites" alt="" address="" directions="" phone="" url="" checkin="" checkout="" price="" lat="" long=""></sleep>
* '''Haus Suites'''
+
*<sleep name="NH Hotel Santa Fe" alt="" address="" directions="" phone="(55) 91.77.73.80" url="" checkin="" checkout="" price="" lat="" long=""></sleep>
* '''NH Hotel Santa Fe'''
+
*<sleep name="Novotel Santa Fe" alt="" address="" directions="" phone="(55) 91.77.77.00" url="" checkin="" checkout="" price="" lat="" long=""></sleep>
 +
*<sleep name="Sheraton Santa Fe" alt="" address="" directions="" phone="(55) 52.58.85.00" url="" checkin="" checkout="" price="" lat="" long=""></sleep>
 +
*<sleep name="Stadia Suites" alt="" address="" directions="" phone="" url="" checkin="" checkout="" price="" lat="" long=""></sleep>
  
 
==Contact==
 
==Contact==
  
 
{{outline}}
 
{{outline}}
 +
 +
[[es:Ciudad de México/Santa Fe]]
 +
[[Wikipedia:Santa Fe (Mexico City)]]
 +
 +
{{Districtguide}}

Latest revision as of 21:46, 15 November 2012

Calakmul building also known as La Lavadora (the washing machine)

Santa Fe is in the western area of Mexico City. It is the newest and most modern district of the city, as almost all of it has been developed only in the past twenty years; this puts this district in stark contrast with Mexico City's other districts, especially the Centro Historico. Many multinational and Mexican companies alike are headquartered here, with multi-million-dollar towers that scrape the sky.

Understand[edit]

Santa Fe was developed in the early 1990's on the remnants of an old landfill -- yes, a junk yard turned into a modern business district. It wasn't until the early 2000's that Santa Fe gained attention , radically different from the rest of the city, because of its ultramodern architecture and contrasting wealth lifestyle signs.

The paranoia that the local authorities have against photographers in Mexico City goes double for Santa Fe. Guards will yell "no photo" at you, or even shoo you away from a building if you as so much approach with a camera, tripod or no. This building is nicknamed, "The Washing Machine Building" (or "Lavandería").

Get in[edit]

Santa Fe is not served by the Metro, so the only ways into the area are by car, taxi or bus. Cars and taxis are probably the fastest, but are certainly not the cheapest. However, Santa Fe is served by Mexico City's RTP network and much more frequently by pesero buses, which leave from Tacubaya station (Metro Lines 1, 7 and 9) and take around 30-45 minutes to get there. Look for buses that say "Sta. Fe" in the window.

Another very convenient way to access Santa Fe is to use the new EcoBus 'Ruta Verde' which travels regularly from Metro Balderas to Santa Fe stopping at many Metro stops along Chapultepec Ave. The journey costs $5 and the buses are clean and modern.

You will recognize instantly when you are in Santa Fe, when the two-lane road widens to lessen stop-and-go traffic and grand office buildings replace stucco shanties. If you're on a pesero, it will travel around the skyscrapers rather than go inbetween them; a good place to get off and look around is when the bus is on Avenida Vasco de Quiroga, or on the opposite end of the line of skyscrapers. Don't wait too long though, because the bus continues onward into the residential area of the hills.

See[edit][add listing]

High rise buildings seen from Vasco de Quiroga Ave.

If you just want to see a radically different side of Mexico City, Santa Fe is the place to be, with lots of skyscrapers and modern architecture. Also, take a stroll in the Alameda, the central park of Santa Fe.

Do[edit][add listing]

There's not much to do; Santa Fe is a business district first and foremost, so during nights and weekends it looks like a ghost town.

Buy[edit][add listing]

  • Centro Santa Fe, Avenida Vasco de Quiroga, [1]. This is the country's largest shopping center with more than 300 stores and a movie theater. Buy the unimaginable, from a t-shirt to a yacht. Anchor stores include Liverpool, El Palacio de Hierro, Sears and the first Saks Fifth Avenue in Mexico. Other remarkable stores include French Connection, Mango, Zara, Massimo Dutti, Armani, Hugo Boss, Tous, Scappino,CHANEL and many others.  edit
  • Zentrika, Prolongación Vasco de Quiroga and Mario Pani street. Features an IMAX 3-D theater and a big food court.  edit

Eat[edit][add listing]

  • Los Canarios. Haute Mexican cuisine. Refined ambiance. $200-350.  edit
  • Guadiana. Haute Mexican cuisine, refined ambiance. $200-350.  edit
  • Estoril Bistro, Gonzalez Camarena 999 1A. Haute Mexican and International Food. $350.  edit
  • Oaxa-K. Inexpensive, great Oaxacan food. $100-150.  edit
  • Ruben's Hamburgers. Mesquite charbroiled sirloin hamburgers. $70-120.  edit
  • El Buen Bife. Argentinian food. $300-400.  edit
  • Taco Inn. Tacos and Mexican food. Inexpensive great food. $100-150.  edit
  • La Buena Tierra, (55) 21.67.40.37. Healthy food. $120-170.  edit
  • La Pergola di Roma. International cuisine. $150-250.  edit
  • Fisher's. Sea food, refined ambiance. $300-500.  edit
  • Chili's. Branch of the American franchise. $150-200.  edit

Drink[edit][add listing]

Sleep[edit][add listing]

  • Camino Real Santa Fe (formerly Vesta).  edit
  • Distrito Capital, Juan Salvador Agraz #37, 52571300, [2]. checkin: 15:00; checkout: 12:00.  edit
  • Fiesta Americana Santa Fe, (55) 11.05.50.00.  edit
  • Haus Suites.  edit
  • NH Hotel Santa Fe, (55) 91.77.73.80.  edit
  • Novotel Santa Fe, (55) 91.77.77.00.  edit
  • Sheraton Santa Fe, (55) 52.58.85.00.  edit
  • Stadia Suites.  edit

Contact[edit]

This article is an outline and needs more content. It has a template, but there is not enough information present. Please plunge forward and help it grow!



Variants

Actions

Destination Docents

In other languages

other sites