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Key Biscayne

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North America : United States of America : Florida : South Florida : Florida Gold Coast : Miami-Dade County : Key Biscayne
Revision as of 10:29, 8 July 2013 by 206.251.230.16 (Talk)

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Key Biscayne refers to both a subtropical island just southeast of Miami and a village on that island. The Village of Key Biscayne, incorporated on June 18, 1991, is located in the center of the four-mile-long, two-mile-wide barrier island between the Atlantic Ocean and Biscayne Bay. The wonderful subtropical island is very quiet and mostly residential. Key Biscayne Island, located south of South Beach, is technically the first island of the Florida Keys. Beaches are spectacular, the landscaping is lush and waterfront activities are plenty. Some consider it the best area to feel like you are in the islands while being in Miami.

Weather[edit]

Despite some cold days every winter, the weather is usually very warm and humid due to its position just above the Tropic of Cancer.

Get in[edit]

By Car[edit]

The island is connected via causeway (FL-913) to the city of Miami on the mainland, approximately seven miles away. The causeway (FL-913) is accessed from I-95 at Exit #1A (the first and last exit along I-95).

By Bus[edit]

  • Rt#102 Route 'B' goes between the Brickell Metrorail Station and Point Florida State Park in Key Biscayne.

See[edit][add listing]

  • Crandon Park is a laid-back park located in the northern part of Key Biscayne, popular with families due to its three and a half mile, soft sand beach and calm waters. It was named “Best Beach,” by South Florida Parenting Magazine. Parking is inexpensive and plentiful at Crandon, and the park also has a marina, Miami golf course, tennis courts and a children’s play area with a restored carousel.
  • Bill Baggs Cape Florida State Recreation Area has beautiful beaches, turquoise blue water, great sunsets and a lighthouse. Tours of the lighthouse, as well as the park’s Cultural Center are available. This park offers rentals for beach chairs, umbrellas, rollerblades, ocean kayaks, windsurfers, bikes and hydrobikes.


Do[edit][add listing]

Key Biscayne has long, winding roads that are great for biking and rollerblading.

Parks occupy much of the key, providing facilities for golf, tennis, softball, swimming, sunbathing and picnicking.

  • At 9.5 acres in size, the village green contains multi-use open fields, a half-mile jogging course, a tot lot with interactive splash fountain, a community bandstand, restrooms and small shade pavilion.
  • The Lake Park, nearly one acre in size, features a small shade pavilion overlooking the lake.
  • East Enid Linear Park, a 1/2 mile in length, contains a ten-foot wide, bricked walkway leading to Ocean Park. The Ocean Park, recently completed, features native landscaping, a palm plaza, a large shade pavilion, and restrooms with shower facilities.
  • Calusa Park, a 7.5-acre area at the south end of Crandon Park, abuts the village and features four public tennis courts and a multi-purpose recreation building. The playing fields and basketball courts at St. Agnes Academy are used by the Village under a shared-use agreement.

Buy[edit][add listing]

The village of Key Biscayne is full of Miami shopping, Miami restaurants and lodging, all in a lush, lazy setting that is a nice escape from the crowds and buzz of nearby Miami Beach.

Eat[edit][add listing]

Drink[edit][add listing]

Relax during the day and party in Miami nightlife. A car is definitely required to do things in Miami.

Sleep[edit][add listing]

Upscale hotels such as the Ritz Carlton are also present on the island.

Contact[edit]


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