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Difference between revisions of "Kameyama"

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East Asia : Japan : Kansai : Mie : Kameyama
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==Get in==
 
==Get in==
Kameyama is on the JR Kansai Line, roughly half way between Kamo Station in [[Kyoto]] Prefecture and [[Nagoya]]. The Kamo-Kameyama section of the Kansai Line consists of one track and is not electrified, and is thus served by a one- or two-car diesel trains, running once per hour, and taking 90 minutes to cover about 60 km of track. The Kameyama-Nagoya section is electrified, and thus served by regular electric trains that you see everywhere else in Japan.
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Kameyama is on the JR Kansai Line, roughly half way between Kamo Station in [[Kyoto (prefecture)|Kyoto Prefecture]] and [[Nagoya]]. The Kamo-Kameyama section of the Kansai Line consists of one track and is not electrified, and is thus served by a one- or two-car diesel trains, running once per hour, and taking 90 minutes to cover about 60 km of track. The Kameyama-Nagoya section is electrified, and thus served by regular electric trains that you see everywhere else in Japan.
  
 
==Get around==
 
==Get around==

Revision as of 05:38, 3 August 2009

Kameyama is a city in Mie Prefecture, Japan.

Contents

Get in

Kameyama is on the JR Kansai Line, roughly half way between Kamo Station in Kyoto Prefecture and Nagoya. The Kamo-Kameyama section of the Kansai Line consists of one track and is not electrified, and is thus served by a one- or two-car diesel trains, running once per hour, and taking 90 minutes to cover about 60 km of track. The Kameyama-Nagoya section is electrified, and thus served by regular electric trains that you see everywhere else in Japan.

Get around

See

Do

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Eat

  • Brazilian restaurant, which appears to be a hang out spot of the local members of the Brazilian diaspora. A friendly proprietor who speaks Portuguese, but not much English or Japanese, runs this self-service place with a couple rice cookers containing Brazilian home cooking, including rice and feijoada that are absolutely delicious. The patrons will help you translate your requests from Japanese into Portuguese, but it's good to be able to at least say "thank you" for the meal — "obrigado" in Portuguese. A large plate of rice and feijoada, some other meat side dish, salad, and a bottle of water run only 830 yen.

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