Jurassic Coast

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Durdle Door, to the west of Lulworth Cove on Dorset's Jurassic Coast.

The Jurassic Coast [1] is the popular (and now official) name given to a 95 mile (155 km) long stretch of coastline in southern England, incorporating parts of the east Devon and Dorset coasts.

The Jurassic Coast was inscribed as a World Heritage site in 2001 [2] on account of its importance to geology, palaeontology and the sheer beauty of it's landscape. The area attracts hundreds of thousands of fossil hunters, hikers, campers and beach-goers each year.


Regions

Cities

Other destinations

Understand

Many of the earliest recognised scientific dinosaur discoveries were made along the Jurassic Coast in the early 19th century, promoting the rise of the science of palaeontology.


Talk

Get in

Get around

See

The attractions of the Jurassic Coast are many. Not to be missed, however, are:

  • Lulworth Cove at Lulworth
  • Durdle Door, within easy hiking / kayaking distance west of Lulworth

Itineraries

Do

Eat

Drink

Stay safe

Get out

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