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Latest revision as of 19:56, 25 September 2012

Greenlandic (Kalaallisut) is the main language of Greenland.

Pronunciation guide[edit]

Vowels[edit]

  • A
  • E
  • I
  • O
  • U

Vowels for loanwords and names[edit]

  • Æ
  • Ø
  • Å
  • Y

Consonants[edit]

  • F
  • G
  • H
  • J
  • K
  • L
  • M
  • N
  • P
  • Q
  • R
  • S
  • T
  • V

Consonants for loanwords and names[edit]

  • B
  • C
  • D
  • W
  • X
  • Y
  • Z

Common diphthongs[edit]

Phrase list[edit]

Basics[edit]

Hello. 
Haluu. ( )
Hello. (informal
Kutaa. ( )
How are you? 
Qanoq ippit?( ?)
Are you well/good? 
Ajunngilatit? ( )
Fine, thank you. 
Ajunngilanga, qujanaq. ( )
It's good/fine. 
Ajunngilaq. ( )
What is your name? 
Qanoq ateqarpit? ( ?)
My name is ______ . 
______-mik ateqarpunga . ( _____ .)
Nice to meet you. 
. ( )
Please. 
. ( )
Thank you. 
Qujanaq. ( )
You're welcome. (you too
Illillu. ( )
Yes. 
Aap/Aappi/Suu. ( )
No. 
Naa/Naamik. ( )
Maybe. 
Immaqa. ( )
Right? 
Ilaa? ( )
Excuse me. (getting attention
. ( )
Excuse me. (begging pardon
. ( )
I'm sorry. 
Utoqqatserpunga. ( )
Goodbye 
Baaj/Baj/Baabaj ( )
See you! 
Takuss!( )
I can't speak name of language [well]. 
. ( [ ])
Do you speak English? 
Tuluttut oqaluttarpi? ( ?)
Is there someone here who speaks English? 
 ? ( ?)
Help! 
Ikiu! ( !)
Look out! 
Mianersorit! ( !)
Good morning. 
Kumoorn. ( )
Good afternoon 
. ( )
Good evening. 
. ( )
Good night. 
Kunaat. ( )
Good night (sleep well, to one person
Sinilluarit. ( )
I don't understand. 
Paasinngilanga. ( )
Where is the toilet? 
Anartarfik sumiippa? ( ?)

Problems[edit]

Numbers[edit]

Cardinal Numbers[edit]

In Greenland only 1-12 in Greenlandic are used. This is caused by a system of numerals used in the past where the toes and fingers were used to count to 20 which would be inuk naallugu or a complete human. 79 would be four complete humans minus one.

nuulu, noor'lu (NOO-loo, NOR-loo)
ataaseq (at-AR-sek)
marluk (MAR-look)
pingasut (PEEN-ga-soot)
sisamat (SEE-sa-mat)
tallimat (TAL-li-mat)
arfineq (when counting and with time), arfinillit (when counting objects) (AR-feen-ek, ar-FEEN-eel-lit)
arfineq marluk (AR-feen-ek MAR-look)
arfineq pingasut (AR-feen-ek PEEN-ga-soot)
(Northern Greenlandic) qulingiluat (counting/time), qualaaluat (objects) (kwel-LING-il-yoo-at, kwal-AA-loo-at)

(Southern Greenlandic) qulaaluat (kwul-AA-loo-at)

10 
qulit (kwulit)
11 
aqqaneq (counting/time), aqqanillit (objects) (AK-kan-ek, ak-KAN-eel-lit)

(Northern Greenlandic) isikkaneq (counting/time), isikkanillit (objects) (ISI-kan-ek, isi-kan-EEL-lit)

12 
aqqaneq marluk (AK-kan-ek MAR-look)

(North Greenlandic) isikkaneq marluk (ISI-kan-ek MAR-look)

The numerals after 12 are Danish now but 13-20 in old Greenlandic are underneath as well as 100 and 1000:

13 
aqqaneq pingasut (AK-kan-ek PEEN-ga-soot)
14 
aqqaneq sisamat (AK-kan-ek SEE-sa-mat)
15 
aqqaneq tallimat (AK-kan-ek TAL-lee-mat)
16 
arvirsanillit (arv-ER-san-eel-lit)
17 
arvirsani marluk (arv-ER-san-ee MAR-look)
18 
arvirsani pingasut ( arv-ER-san-ee PEEN-ga-soot)
19 
arvirsani sisamat (arv-ER-san-ee SEE-sa-mat)
20 
arvirsani tallimat (arv-ER-san-ee TAL-lee-mat) or inuk naallugu (een-ook narl-loogoo)
100 
untriti (un-TREE-tee)
1000 
tuusinti (too-SEEN-tee)

Ordinal Numbers[edit]

first 
siulleq (SEE-oo-leek)
second 
aappaa (ARP-par)
third 
pingajuat (peen-GA-joo-at)
fourth 
sisamaat (SEE-sa-mart)
fifth 
tallimaat (tal-LEE-mart)
sixth 
arvirnat (arv-ERN-at)
seventh 
arviniq aappaat (ARV-in-ik ARP-part)
eighth 
arviniq pingajuat (ARV-in-ik peen-GA-joo-at)
ninth 
qulingiluaat (Northern), qulaaluaat (Southern) (kwoo-LEENG-eel-yoo-art, KWOO-lar-loo-art)
tenth 
qulingat (kwoo-LEENG-at)
eleventh 
aqqarnat (ak-KAR-nat)
twelth 
aqqaneq aappaat (AK-kan-ek ARP-part)

Numbers over 12th are Danish loan-numerals such as tretteniat is 13th and tyviat is 20th.

Time[edit]

yesterday 
ippassaq ( )
the day before yesterday 
ippassaani ( )
today 
ullumi ( )
tomorrow 
aqagu ( )
the day after tomorrow 
aqaguagu ( )
morning 
ullaaq ( )
day 
ulloq ( )
evening 
unnuaq ( )
year 
ukioq ( )
spring 
upernaq ( )
summer 
aasaq ( )
fall/autumn 
ukiaq ( )
winter 
ukioq (same as year, )

Clock time[edit]

Duration[edit]

North Avannaq / South Kujataa / East Kangia / West Kitaa /

Days[edit]

Monday 
ataasinngorneq ( )
Tuesday 
marlunngorneq ( )
Wednesday 
pingasunngorneq ( )
Thursday 
sisamanngorneq ( )
Friday 
tallimanngorneq ( )
Saturday 
arfininngorneq ( )
Sunday 
sapaat ( )

Months[edit]

January 
Januaari ( )
February 
Februaari ( )
March 
Marsi ( )
April 
Apriili ( )
May 
Maaji ( )
June 
Juuni ( )
July 
Juuli ( )
August 
Aggusti ( )
September 
Septembari ( )
October 
Oktobari ( )
November 
Novembari ( )
December 
Decembari ( )

Writing time and date[edit]

Colors[edit]

West Kitaa /

white 
qaqortoq ( )
black 
qernertoq ( )
red 
aappalaartoq ( )
green 
qorsoq ( )
blue 
tungujortoq ( )
yellow 
sungaartoq ( )

Transportation[edit]

car 
biili ( )
bicycle 
sikkili ( )
boat (small, personal
umiatsiaq ( )
boat (traditional, for women
umiaq/umiak ( )
boat (big
umiarsuaq ( )
kayak 
qajaq ( )
dog sled 
qimusseq ( )

Bus and train[edit]

bus 
bussi ( )

Directions[edit]

forward 
siumut ( )

Taxi[edit]

taxa 
tarssa ( )

Lodging[edit]

house 
illu/illoq ( )
room 
ini ( )
apartment 
inissiaq ( )

Money[edit]

money 
aningaasat ( )
Danish Kroner 
koroonit ( )
Danish Øre 
oorit ( )

Eating[edit]

Bars[edit]

Shopping[edit]

Driving[edit]

Authority[edit]

police 
politii ( )
doctor 
nakorsaq ( )
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