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(reworked Get in, greatly expanded Get around)
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'''Expo 2005''' (2005年日本国際博覧会 ''2005-nen Nihon kokusai hakurankai'') is the site of the World's Fair for 2005, in the [[Aichi]] prefecture of [[Japan]], near the city of [[Nagoya]].  The exposition will run from March 25 to September 25.
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'''Expo 2005''' (愛知万博 ''Aichi Banpaku'') is the site of the World's Fair for 2005, in the [[Aichi]] prefecture of [[Japan]], near the city of [[Nagoya]].  The exposition will run from March 25 to September 25.
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 +
==Understand==
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Aichi 2005 is Japan's first expo since the 1970 [[Osaka]] Expo and built along somewhat more modest line than its predecessor, which was judged a great hit with 60 million visitors.  The Expo's theme is '''Nature's Wisdom''' and its mission is, according to the official site:
 +
 
 +
: ''We must come together and share our experience and wisdom, in order to create a new direction for humanity which is both sustainable and harmonious with nature.''
 +
 
 +
In Japanese this is expressed with the snappy but near-untranslatable official pun-slogan ''Ai-chikyūpaku'' (愛・地球博), which means something along the lines of "Love the Earth Expo" while keeping [[Aichi]] in there.
 +
 
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Great care has been taken to built the pavilions out of recycled or recyclable materials and to provide environmentally friendly transportation in the Expo area, but some have still questioned the ecological sense of spending 340 billion yen ($3.3 billion) on a six-month extravaganza that will be dismantled after it is over.
  
 
==Get in==
 
==Get in==
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Same-day tickets cost ¥4600/2500/1500 per day for adult/junior/child respectively.  Discounted senior, student, group and evening admission tickets are also available.  The Expo is open from 9:30 to 21:30 daily, although some sections (notably the Seto Area) may close earlier.
 
Same-day tickets cost ¥4600/2500/1500 per day for adult/junior/child respectively.  Discounted senior, student, group and evening admission tickets are also available.  The Expo is open from 9:30 to 21:30 daily, although some sections (notably the Seto Area) may close earlier.
  
Access to some of the more popular events and pavilions is capacity controlled.  You can make up to two advance reservations online [http://www-2.expo2005.or.jp/en/ticket/reservation.html] at least 2 days before, or a single same-day reservation on the day of the event at least 2 hours before the time of the event.
+
Access to some of the more popular events and pavilions is capacity controlled.  You can make up to two advance reservations [http://www-2.expo2005.or.jp/en/ticket/reservation.html online] at least 2 days before, or a single same-day reservation on the day of the event at least 2 hours before the time of the event.
  
 
The grounds are divided into two areas and eight zones:
 
The grounds are divided into two areas and eight zones:
  
 
===Nagakute Area===
 
===Nagakute Area===
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The '''Nagakute Area''' (長久手会場) is the heart of the Expo.
 +
 
====Global Commons====
 
====Global Commons====
The traditional country pavilions, subdivided into 6 zones.  A 2.6-kilometer walkway named the '''Global Loop''' connects them all together and can be covered on foot in an hour.
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The traditional country pavilions featuring the contributions of 120 countries, subdivided into 6 zones.  A 2.6-kilometer walkway named the '''Global Loop''' connects them all together and can be covered on foot in an hour.
  
 
* '''German Pavilion''' (''Zone 3''), [http://www.expo2005-deutschland.de/pavillon.html].  Features a ride in drop-shaped vehicles through a storm.
 
* '''German Pavilion''' (''Zone 3''), [http://www.expo2005-deutschland.de/pavillon.html].  Features a ride in drop-shaped vehicles through a storm.
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====Forest Experience Zone====
 
====Forest Experience Zone====
* '''Satsuki and Mei's House'''. [http://www-2.expo2005.or.jp/en/venue/experience05.html].  A faithful life-size recreation of the house featured in the hit animation movie ''My Neighbor Totoro''.  This is the hardest of all Expo sites to visit: a maximum of 40 foreign visitors per day are allowed, and [http://www-2.expo2005.or.jp/en/ticket/totoro.html applications] must be made a minimum of one month in advance.  Alternatively, you can attempt to apply like the Japanese due via the Lawson convenience store's [http://www.lawson.co.jp/loppi/index.html Loppi] system, but the odds of success this way are even lower.
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* '''Satsuki and Mei's House'''. [http://www-2.expo2005.or.jp/en/venue/experience05.html].  A faithful life-size recreation of the house featured in the hit animation movie ''My Neighbor Totoro''.  This is the hardest of all Expo sites to visit: a maximum of 40 foreign visitors per day are allowed, and [http://www-2.expo2005.or.jp/en/ticket/totoro.html applications] must be made a minimum of one month in advance.  Alternatively, you can attempt to apply like the Japanese do via the Lawson convenience store's [http://www.lawson.co.jp/loppi/index.html Loppi] system, but the odds of success this way are even lower.
  
 
===Seto Area===  
 
===Seto Area===  
 +
The '''Seto Area''' (瀬戸会場) is the smaller and quieter of the two sides, promising a meeting place for man and nature instead of grand spectacles.  Note that the Seto Area closes at 17:30 every day, earlier than the rest of the Expo.
 +
 
* '''Civic Pavilion'''
 
* '''Civic Pavilion'''
 
* '''National Government/Aichi Prefecture Exhibition'''
 
* '''National Government/Aichi Prefecture Exhibition'''

Revision as of 23:16, 26 March 2005

Expo 2005 (愛知万博 Aichi Banpaku) is the site of the World's Fair for 2005, in the Aichi prefecture of Japan, near the city of Nagoya. The exposition will run from March 25 to September 25.

Contents

Understand

Aichi 2005 is Japan's first expo since the 1970 Osaka Expo and built along somewhat more modest line than its predecessor, which was judged a great hit with 60 million visitors. The Expo's theme is Nature's Wisdom and its mission is, according to the official site:

We must come together and share our experience and wisdom, in order to create a new direction for humanity which is both sustainable and harmonious with nature.

In Japanese this is expressed with the snappy but near-untranslatable official pun-slogan Ai-chikyūpaku (愛・地球博), which means something along the lines of "Love the Earth Expo" while keeping Aichi in there.

Great care has been taken to built the pavilions out of recycled or recyclable materials and to provide environmentally friendly transportation in the Expo area, but some have still questioned the ecological sense of spending 340 billion yen ($3.3 billion) on a six-month extravaganza that will be dismantled after it is over.

Get in

By plane

Chubu International Airport is the nearest airport. From here you can take a direct bus, or take a train to Kanayama (金山) station (25 min) and transfer to Expo Shuttle service.

By train

During the Expo, you can board special Expo Shuttle trains directly from Nagoya station to Banpaku Yakusa (万博八草) station (38 min). From here, you can transfer to the Tōbu Kyūryō (東部丘陵線) magnetic levitation line to Banpaku Kaijō (万博会場駅) station, located near the North Gate of the main Nagakute area of the Expo (3 min). Special discount return tickets are available for ¥1200, and they also allow a ¥200 discount on the gondola service.

Alternatively, take the Higashiyama subway line to terminus Fujigaoka (25 min), then transfer to the Tōbu Kyūryō line (12 min).

By bus

Direct buses run from Nagoya station (¥1000/1500 one-way/return) and Chubu Airport to the East Gate of the Expo site.

Get around

Transport around the Expo site is provided by a host of unusual systems, but few of them are free.

By IMTS

The Intelligent Multimode Transit System (IMTS) shuttle, basically a networked train of automated minibuses, connects the North Gate, the West Gate, the Convention Center (Messe) and the Expo Dome together. Rides cost ¥200 a pop.

By tram

The Global Tram system shuttled around the Global Loop connecting the country pavilions together. Rides cost ¥500.

By gondola

There are two cable car gondola lifts set up in the Expo. The Morizō Gondola connects the Nagakute and Seto areas together, and is free, while the Kiccoro Gondola travels from the northeast to the southwest corner of the Nagakute area and charges ¥600 one way for the panoramic views offered.

By bus

A comparatively normal-looking and for once free fuel cell hybrid bus also shuttles between the Nagakute and Seto areas.

By bicycle taxi

Three-wheeled passenger taxis operating the old-fashioned way by somebody pedaling the metal carry people around the site for ¥300 per trip.

See & Do

Same-day tickets cost ¥4600/2500/1500 per day for adult/junior/child respectively. Discounted senior, student, group and evening admission tickets are also available. The Expo is open from 9:30 to 21:30 daily, although some sections (notably the Seto Area) may close earlier.

Access to some of the more popular events and pavilions is capacity controlled. You can make up to two advance reservations online at least 2 days before, or a single same-day reservation on the day of the event at least 2 hours before the time of the event.

The grounds are divided into two areas and eight zones:

Nagakute Area

The Nagakute Area (長久手会場) is the heart of the Expo.

Global Commons

The traditional country pavilions featuring the contributions of 120 countries, subdivided into 6 zones. A 2.6-kilometer walkway named the Global Loop connects them all together and can be covered on foot in an hour.

  • German Pavilion (Zone 3), [1]. Features a ride in drop-shaped vehicles through a storm.

Central Zone

The centre for events and performances.

  • Global House, [2]. Home to the 18,000-year-old Yukagir Mammoth.

Japan Zone

Promotional propaganda courtesy of the governments of Aichi, Nagoya City, the Chubu region and the national government of Japan.

  • Japan Pavilion Nagakute, [3]. Features the world's first completely hemispherical 360° "Earth Vision" panorama theater.

Corporate Pavilion Zone

Where Japan's companies come out to play.

  • Hitachi Group, [4]. Features a virtual reality safari of endangered species, using 3D headsets and hand sensors for interaction.
  • Toyota Group, [5]. One of the most popular pavilions, packed with futuristic cars and wacky robots.

Interactive Fun Zone

NGOs and assorted tree-huggers.

Forest Experience Zone

  • Satsuki and Mei's House. [6]. A faithful life-size recreation of the house featured in the hit animation movie My Neighbor Totoro. This is the hardest of all Expo sites to visit: a maximum of 40 foreign visitors per day are allowed, and applications must be made a minimum of one month in advance. Alternatively, you can attempt to apply like the Japanese do via the Lawson convenience store's Loppi system, but the odds of success this way are even lower.

Seto Area

The Seto Area (瀬戸会場) is the smaller and quieter of the two sides, promising a meeting place for man and nature instead of grand spectacles. Note that the Seto Area closes at 17:30 every day, earlier than the rest of the Expo.

  • Civic Pavilion
  • National Government/Aichi Prefecture Exhibition
  • Satoyama Trail Zone — a trail in a forest

Buy

Response to the Expo itself has been a little lackluster, but the Expo's lovable mascots Kiccoro and Morizō [7] have become a huge hit. Available in souvenir shops everywhere.

Eat & Drink

In a bald excuse for profit grubbing, you are strictly prohibited from bringing drinks in bottles (excuse: terrorism} or any type of food (excuse: food poisoning) onto the grounds. Drink cartons, on the other hand, are A-OK.

There are 38 restaurants, 4 convenience stores and a bazillion vending machines on site.

Sleep

There is no lodging available on site, but Nagoya is not far away.

A special program offering homestays for Expo visitors in the homes of ordinary Nagoya families has been set up. Costs are only ¥1000-3000 per night with two meals, but the application process is fairly bureaucratic — you must be sponsored by an organization such as a university and you must mail your application at least one month in advance — and after all that trouble you may end up in a remote suburb.

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