Help Wikitravel grow by contributing to an article! Learn how.

Difference between revisions of "Eastern Europe"

From Wikitravel
Jump to: navigation, search
(Not sure why that was removed)
m
Line 92: Line 92:
 
{{outline}}
 
{{outline}}
 
{{continentalsectionguide}}
 
{{continentalsectionguide}}
{{isIn|Europe}}
+
{{IsIn|Europe}}
  
 
[[ca:Europa de l'Est]]
 
[[ca:Europa de l'Est]]

Revision as of 19:42, 14 July 2007

Eastern Europe region

Eastern Europe is the name of the region which encompasses the countries in the east of Europe.

The region is not strictly defined, as some of these countries fall into more than one area - for example Transylvania being part of Romania is considered a part of Central Europe, while the rest of the country is in Eastern Europe.

Contents

Countries

Regions

Baltic states:

Russia and the Caucasus:

Cities

Other destinations

Understand

Eastern European countries except Bulgaria and Romania share a common recent history, having been republics of former Soviet Union.

Eastern Europe is sometimes confused with the Eastern Bloc, which is a Cold War name for communist countries that were behind the "iron curtain". Eastern Bloc included all the countries of Eastern Europe, several countries of Central Europe and individual countries on other continents, particularly in Asia.

After the Baltic states, Bulgaria and Romania joined EU in 2007.

Talk

Russian is the traditional lingua franca of Eastern Europe, at least in countries constituting the former Soviet Union, but is increasingly being displaced by English and German as younger generations choose a more Western-oriented outlook. Eastern Europeans who do speak Russian are sometimes hostile to being addressed in the language, because they have unpleasant memories of being forced to learn the language (this is not the case in the Caucasus, where Russian schooling was optional).

Get in

Get around

By thumb

The attitude in Eastern Europe towards hitchhiking is very relaxed. Money is rarely requested. Majority of the fast roads fall short of being western highways; walking and hitching on them tends to be OK. When travelling long distance, make sure you don't get stuck in the middle of a smaller village - walking out of it will take forever. Check with the driver, and get off either before, or better yet, after you pass the city. Most drivers will be nice to offer a ride to get you to the convenient location.

See

Itineraries

Do

  • Walk down Nevsky Prospekt in St. Petersburg, Russia
  • Stroll down the Arbat Pedestrian Street in Moscow, Russia
  • See any one of three big palaces outside St. Petersburg, Russia
  • At the Red Square in Moscow, see Lenin's Mausoleum, the massive GUM department store, and St. Basil's Cathedral
  • Admire the beautiful stations of the Moscow Metro
  • For a unique experience, stay in one of the Seven Sisters Moscow skyscrapers that are hotels. Choose from the Ukraine or Leningradskaya
  • See the monuments to the bloodbath Battle of Stalingrad in Volgograd, Russia (formerly Stalingrad)
  • With a tour, see the abandoned city of Prypiat at Chernobyl, in the Ukraine
  • See the massive People's House, one of the largest buildings in the world, in Bucharest, Romania
  • See Frankenstein's Castle in Transylvania, Romania

Eat

Drink

Stay safe

Get out

This article is an outline and needs more content. It has a template, but there is not enough information present. Please plunge forward and help it grow!




Variants

Actions

Destination Docents

In other languages

other sites