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Detroit

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Detroit is a huge city with several district articles containing sightseeing, restaurant, nightlife and accommodation listings — have a look at each of them.
Detroit city skyline

Detroit, [1] a major metropolis in the US state of Michigan, has had a profound impact on the world. From the advent of the automotive assembly line to the Motown sound, modern techno and rock music, Detroit continues to shape both American and global culture. The city has seen many of its historic buildings renovated, and is bustling with new developments and attractions that complement its world class museums and theatres. The city offers a myriad of things to see and do. Detroit is an exciting travel destination filled with technological advance and historic charm.

Districts

Detroit districts map.png
Downtown
The city's central business district. It is home to several nice parks, the country's second-largest large theatre district, great architecture, and many of the city's attractions. It is Detroit's center of life.
Midtown-New Center
The city's cultural center, home to several world class museums and galleries. The area is also home to some great 1920s architecture. It is probably the most unique destination in Detroit.
East Side
This part of the city includes much of the riverfront, Belle Isle, the historic Eastern Market, Pewabic Pottery, and more.
Southwest Side
Home to many of the city's ethnic neighborhoods, such as Mexicantown and Corktown. The area is mostly known for its cuisine in these ethnic neighborhoods; however it is also home to many historical sites, such as the Michigan Central Station, Tiger Stadium, and Fort Wayne.
West Side
Home to many historic neighborhoods, the University District, the Michigan State Fair, and much of the infamous 8 Mile. It will be the home of Detroit's only shopping mall.
Hamtramck-Highland Park
While not part of the City of Detroit, the cities of Hamtramck and Highland Park are entirely surrounded by Detroit, with the exception of where they each border one another. Hamtramck is sometimes referred to as "Poletown" because of the large Polish population and influence in the city. Highland Park is home to many historic buildings and neighborhoods.

Understand

Climate Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec
Daily highs (°F) 31 33 44 58 70 79 83 81 74 62 48 35
Nightly lows (°F) 16 18 27 37 48 57 62 60 53 41 32 22
Precipitation (in) 1.9 1.7 2.4 3 2.9 3.6 3.1 3.4 2.8 2.2 2.7 2.5

Check Detroit's 7 day forecast at NOAA

Detroit is the largest city in the U.S. to offer casino resorts. The three major casino resorts include MGM Grand Detroit, Greektown, and MotorCity. A fourth major casino is just across the river in Windsor, Canada. Detroit Metro Airport is one of the few to offer world class hotel and meeting facilities inside the terminal. The Renaissance Center and the Southfield Town Center are among the nation's finest mixed use facilities for large conferences. Downtown Detroit serves as the cultural and entertainment hub of the metropolitan region, Windsor, Ontario, and even for Toledo, Ohio residents, many of whom work in metropolitan Detroit. While most of the region's attractions are in the city of Detroit, tourists will find that nearly all of the shopping malls are located in suburbs, such as Troy. The Detroit-Windsor metro area population totals about 5.9 million; it jumps to 6.5 million if Toledo is included. An estimated 46 million people live within a 300 mile (480 km) radius of Detroit. The city's northern inner ring suburbs like Ferndale, Southfield, Royal Oak, and Birmingham provide an urban experience in the suburbs complete with dining, shopping and other attractions. The Detroit area has many regal mansions especially in Grosse Pointe, Bloomfield Hills, and Birmingham. Troy and Livonia provide the best of American suburbia while Ann Arbor provides the nearby experience of a college town.

Detroit is an international destination for sporting events of all types; patrons enjoy their experience in world class venues. The Detroit Convention and Visitors bureau maintains the Detroit Metro Sports Commission [2]. The city and region have state of the art facilities for major conferences and conventions.

Detroit is known as the world's "Automobile Capital" and "Motown" (for "Motor Town"), the city where Henry Ford pioneered the automotive assembly line, with the world's first mass produced car, the Model T. During World War II, President Franklin Roosevelt called Detroit, the "Arsenal of Democracy." Today, the region serves as the global center for the automotive world. Headquartered in metro Detroit, General Motors, Ford, and Chrysler all have major corporate, manufacturing, engineering, design, and research facilities in the area. Hyundai, Toyota, Nissan, among others, have a presence in the region. The University of Michigan in Ann Arbor is a global leader in research and development. Metro Detroit has made Michigan's economy a leader in information technology, life sciences, and advanced manufacturing. Michigan ranks fourth nationally in high tech employment with 568,000 high tech workers, including 70,000 in the automotive industry. Michigan typically ranks among the top three states for overall Research & Development investment expenditures in the U.S. The domestic Auto Industry accounts directly and indirectly for one of every ten jobs in the U.S.

Downtown Detroit is unique - an International Riverfront [3], ornate buildings, sculptures, fountains, the nation's second largest theater district, and one of the nation's largest collection of pre-depression era skyscrapers. Two major traffic circles along Woodward Avenue surround Campus Martius Park and Grand Circus Park, both gathering points. The city has ample parking much of it in garages. Many historic buildings have been converted into loft apartments, and over sixty new businesses have opened in the Central Business District over the past two years. Downtown Detroit features the Renaissance Center, including the tallest hotel in the Western Hemisphere, the Detroit Marriott, with the largest rooftop restaurant, the Coach Insignia. Many restaurants emanate from the Renaissance Center, Greektown, the arts and theatre district, and stadium area. Joining the east riverfront parks, the city has the 982-acre (3.9 km²; 2.42 sq mi) Belle Isle Park with the large James Scott Memorial Fountain, historic conservatory, gardens, and spectacular views of the city skyline. Visitors may reserve a public dock downtown at the Tri-Centennial State Park and Harbor. Great Lakes Cruises are also available. Surrounding neighborhoods such as Corktown, home to Detroit's early Irish population, New Center [4], Midtown, and Eastern Market [5] (the nation's largest open air market), are experiencing a revival. Detroit has a rich architectural heritage, from the restoration of the historic Westin Book-Cadillac Hotel downtown to the Westin Detroit Hotel surrounded by the golden towers of the ultra-contemporary Southfield Town Center [6]. In 2005, Detroit's architecture was heralded as some of America's finest; many of the city's architecturally significant buildings are listed by the National Trust for Historic Preservation as among America's most endangered landmarks.

Orientation

Detroit is bordered to the south by the Detroit River, which divides the U.S. and Canada (Detroit is the only place in the continental U.S. where you have to go south to enter Canada!). Downtown is on the riverfront, so the rest of the city expands north, east, and west from downtown. The Cultural Center, home to most of the city's museums, is just north of downtown, in Midtown.

Get in

By plane

Detroit Metro Airport (IATA: DTW) [7] is in Romulus, about 20 minutes west of the city proper, located at the junction between I-275 and I-94 with many nearby hotels. The airport is a major Delta hub and operational headquarters, so it offers direct flights to and from a surprising variety of cities, from Seattle to Osaka. The terminal offers Delta SkyClubs as well as a Westin Hotel and conference center. The massive, recently completed midfield McNamara Terminal serves Delta and its SkyTeam partners; all other carriers utilize the new North Terminal. For convenience, the McNamara Terminal and North Terminals have both domestic and international gates in the same terminal. An enclosed light rail system shuttles travelers in the McNamara Terminal. There is a free shuttle between the terminals – look for blue and white vans that say "Westin - Terminal." The airport is one of the most recently modernized in the U.S. with six major runways.

The quickest way to get to downtown Detroit is to rent a car or take a taxi-cab. Standard cab fare to downtown is $45-$50. You can also get to Detroit using the SMART (suburban) mass transit bus system [8]. Route 125 serves the airport approximately every half hour, beginning alternately at the Smith and McNamara terminals (no bus serves both terminals), and takes about an hour and fifteen minutes to get downtown. The fare is $2.00. Familiarize yourself with the route map and schedule before you try this–-it is more commonly used by workers at the airport than tourists.

By car

Several interstates converge in downtown Detroit. I-75/the Chrysler (N. of Downtown)/the Fisher (S. of Downtown) Freeway North/South runs from Toledo through downtown Detroit to the Upper Peninsula of Michigan. I-94/the Ford Freeway runs East/West from Chicago to Detroit and continues up to Sarnia. I-96 East/West heads from Detroit to Lansing, Michigan. I-696/the Reuther Freeway runs along about 3 miles north of city limit (8 Mile), connecting the eastern suburbs (e.g. St. Clair Shores) to Southfield. I-275 connects with the suburb of Livonia. Highways, the Lodge Freeway, M-14, M-23, and the Southfield Freeway are major freeways which interconnect with the Interstates in the Detroit metro area to ease navigation. The Southfield Freeway, connects Dearborn to Southfield. The Lodge Freeway, connects Southfield to downtown. Highway M-14 connects Ann Arbor to Detroit via the Jeffries Expressway. Bypassing Ann Arbor, highway M-23 connects I-94 to I-96.

The metro area's major Interstates and freeways were overhauled in preparation the 2006 National Football League Super Bowl XL in Detroit and are in good condition.

As with any major city, traffic during rush hour can make travel really slow. This is especially aggravated during shift changes at the local automotive plants. But due to economic hardships for the region, rush hour traffic lasts less than an hours, and some freeways are clear all day. The Mixing Bowl (see Get around, By Car), 75/696 Interchange the 94/Ford Freeway through Detroit, and the Southfield Freeway can be slow in late afternoons.

For smaller streets, the Detroit area is laid out in wheel-and-spoke, grid, and strip-farm configuration. This was due to first French development (strip farms along the river), early city layout (wheel and spoke from the river's edge), followed by the modern North/South grid. Mile roads run east-west, starting at downtown Detroit and increasing as you travel north. These mile roads may change name in different cities, so pay attention. There are also several spoke roads, including Woodward Ave, Michigan Ave, Gratiot Ave, and Grand River Ave. Only in the old downtown business district is the original Washington D.C./L'enfant style wheel and spoke layout found (it is quite confusing, with several one-way streets added for fun). In areas along the River and Lake St. Clair, the colonial-era French practice of allocating strips of land with water access is seen as main roads parallel the water, and secondary roads perpendicular to it. This is very confusing to non-residents.

By bus

  • Greyhound [9]. Service west to Chicago (5-8 hours, $35) , east to Toronto (5-6 hours), and south to Toledo (1 hour, $15), as well as all over Michigan. The terminal is near downtown at 1001 Howard St.
  • Megabus [10]. Discount bus service to and from Chicago (6 hours, $1-$25), with connections at Chicago to many Midwestern cities. Part of the reason why it's so cheap is that there is no terminal–-the bus simply stops at a street corner, either Cass and Warren, near Wayne State University and the museum/cultural district, or at the Rosa Parks Transit Center at Cass and Michigan.
  • Transit Windsor [11]. Running seven days a week for $3.75. Service from 300 Chatham St West in Windsor into, and around downtown Detroit.

By train

  • Amtrak [12]. Train service to and from Chicago on the Wolverine Service (5-6 hours, $25-$50), with many connections in Chicago. Deeply discounted tickets at short notice are often available at Amtrak's Weekly Specials page [13]. For travel to the east, a bus connection is available to the Toledo Amtrak station, with trains to New York (21 hours, $75-$150) and Washington, D.C. (16 hours, $65-$130), but travelers may find the middle-of-the-night departures unappealing. The train station is conveniently located at 11 W. Baltimore at the corner of Woodward Ave., in the midtown area of the city.

Get around

Detroit's street layout is truly unique, combining wheel-and-spoke, grid, and strip-farm (near the River) layouts. Six major spoke roads radiate out from downtown; they are, in clockwise order, Fort Street, Michigan Avenue, Grand River Avenue, Woodward Avenue, Gratiot Avenue, and Jefferson Avenue. Woodward Avenue runs northwest-southeast (more or less) and divides the northern half of Detroit into east and west; West Warren Street, for instance, becomes East Warren Street when it crosses Woodward. Smaller streets generally conform to a strict grid pattern, although the orientation of the grid and the size and shape of blocks frequently varies to fit better with the spoke roads. Downtown, the layout abandons the grid design, with the spoke roads converging in a confusing but oddly logical arrangement of diagonal, mostly one-way streets.

By car

Detroit spreads over a large area, and getting around may prove to be difficult without a car. Nonetheless, an extensive freeway system and ample parking make the region one of the most auto-friendly in North America. Detroit has one of America's most modern freeway systems. See the Michigan Department of Transportation [14] website for a current listing of downtown road closures and construction projects. Downtown has parking garages in strategic locations.

Greektown Casino, located downtown, has a free 13 floor parking garage. Visitors are welcome to pay to park at the Renaissance Center garage. There are plenty of pay-to-park garages, lots, and valet near the Greektown/stadium areas. Premium parking right next to the stadium is well worth the extra price and usually available during a game. Downtown has an ease of entry from the freeways which may surprise new visitors. Valet parking is available at four Renaissance Center locations, the main Winter Garden entrance along the Riverfront, the Jefferson Avenue lobby, Marriott hotel entrance west, and Seldom Blues entrance west.

Detroit has an abundance of taxi, limo, and shuttle services. Car rental prices are reasonable.

While MDOT has since discontinued emphasis on the names of freeways, most locals still are clinging onto their names. Here they are: I-75, The Chrysler Freeway, The Fisher Freeway, "The DT" Expressway ("DT" stands for Detroit-Toledo); I-96, from downtown to the 275 Junction: The Jeffries Freeway; I-94, through Detroit: The Ford Freeway, through Macomb and St. Clair Counties: The O'Hara Freeway; I-696, entire way: The Reuther Freeway; M-10, from Detroit to the Mixing Bowl: The Lodge Freeway, north of the Mixing Bowl Northwestern Highway; M-8, entire way: The Davison Freeway; M-39: The Southfield Freeway; M-53: The Van Dyke Expressway (commonly called, but not "officially designated").

The Mixing Bowl is the confluence of the Lodge/Northwestern, the Reuther, Telegraph Rd, and Franklin Rd. The Spaghetti Bowl is the confluence of 96/275, the Reuther, the M-5, and the Haggerty Connector. The Junction is the confluence of the Jeffries, 275, and M-14 on the far west side suburbs. The Triangle is the beginning of the Jeffries at the Fisher Freeway. The Interchange is the interchange of the Reuther and the Chrysler Freeways.

On foot or by bicycle

A car is helpful for getting around the rest of the city, but due to the unusual layout and large number of one-way streets, getting out and walking for a few blocks is a good way to see downtown. Bike rentals are available in downtown Detroit along the International Riverfront at Rivard Plaza from Wheelhouse. Downtown and the riverfront are usually bustling with visitors.

By bus

The Detroit Department of Transportation [15] provides mass transit bus service within the city of Detroit. Downtown has a the new Rosa Parks Transit Center. DDOT buses are yellow and green. For safety, DDOT buses may be patrolled by the Wayne County sheriff's deputies. 17 routes serve the central bus terminal, which is downtown at Griswold and Shelby streets. The standard fare $1.50; transfers are $0.25.

By elevated rail

People Mover

Completed in 1987, the People Mover [16] is a fully automated, elevated rail system that runs a three mile loop in the downtown area. It is the best way to get around the downtown area. A round trip excursion, covering thirteen stations, takes approximately 20 minutes and offers great views of the city's downtown landmarks. Signature stops include the Renaissance Center (GM HQ & Retail Complex), Greektown, Joe Louis Arena (Home of the Detroit Red Wings), Cobo (Convention) Center, and Cadillac Center (Campus Martius Park). The stations feature original works by local artists. Standard fare $0.50 in cash, a token can also be bought at the same price.

See

This is only a small list of some of the biggest attractions and even though they are listed here, their info is brief. Make sure to check out the district articles for more.

Architecture

The Renaissance Center
  • Renaissance Center, also known as the Ren Cen, is a group of seven interconnected skyscrapers whose central tower is the tallest building in Michigan and the tallest hotel in the Western Hemisphere. Built in 1977, it has the world's largest rooftop restaurant that can be reached by a glass elevator ride. The headquarters of General Motors, it is on the Detroit International Riverfront. See: Downtown.
  • Fisher Building is an historic Art-Deco building designed by Albert Kahn in 1928. It has been called Detroit's largest art object. See: Midtown-New Center.
  • Guardian Building is a bold example of Art Deco architecture, including art moderne designs. The interior, decorated with mosaic and Pewabic and Rookwood tile, is a must-see. See: Downtown.
  • Westin Book Cadillac Hotel is a recently renovated architectural gem first built in 1928. See: Downtown.
  • Wayne County Building is America's best surviving example of Roman Baroque architecture. See: Downtown.

Historic neighborhoods

  • Corktown is Detroit's oldest neighborhood. It was settled by Irish people from County Cork, hence the name Corktown. Many historic landmarks are located in the neighborhood, such as the Michigan Central Station and Tigers Stadium. See: Southwest Side.
  • Greektown is probably Detroit's most famous neighborhood. It has an endless amount of Greek restaurants and is home to Greektown Casino. See: Downtown.
  • Mexicantown is the fastest growing neighborhood in Detroit. It is famous for its Mexican cuisine, which is evidenced by its vast number of restaurants. See: Southwest Side.
  • Palmer Woods is a private historic neighborhood in the city of Detroit west of Woodward Avenue and north of Palmer Park. See: West Side.
  • Woodbridge is an historic district home to many architecturally significant houses, most of which are Victorian-style. The neighborhood was one of the few that were not affected by Detroit's decay a few decades back. See: Southwest Side.

Museums

  • Charles H. Wright Museum of African American History holds the world's largest permanent exhibit on African American culture. See: Midtown-New Center.
  • Detroit Institute of Arts is one of the most significant museums in the United States. It has an art collection worth more than one billion dollars. See: Midtown-New Center.
  • Hitsville U.S.A. was Motown Records' first headquarters. Berry Gordy founded it in 1959, and all of the Motown hits were recorded here. Today, the building houses a museum of the history of Motown Records. See: Midtown-New Center.

Parks

  • Campus Martius Park is Detroit's main park. Several skyscrapers surround this park and the adjacent Cadillac Square Park, which was made in 2007 to increase the amount of park space. The park is also home to several monuments, such as the Michigan Soldiers' and Sailors' monument, a Civil War monument. See: Downtown.
  • Hart Plaza is a park located on Detroit's riverfront. It offers great views of the city's skyline and also has several monuments, such as Dodge Fountain and the Joe Louis Fist. See: Downtown.
  • Grand Circus Park is a park that connects the financial district to the theatre district. It is also surrounded by many skyscrapers, many of which are abandoned. The park also has many monuments and statues. See: Downtown.

Do

This is only a small list of some of the some key activities and events to enjoy and even though they are listed here, their info is brief. Make sure to check out the district articles for more.

  • Casinos The three major casinos include, MGM Grand Detroit, Motor City and Greektown. Check for performances.
  • Concerts, and more Detroit is the birthplace of American electro/techno music, with Juan Atkins, Kevin Saunderson, and Derrick May all hailing from the area. Although other cities around the world have picked up Detroit's torch and carried it further in some ways, Detroit is still a great place to dance and see the masters at work.
  • Cruise Ships, the Great Lakes Cruising Coalition [17] The Dock of Detroit [18] receives major cruise lines on the Great Lakes. Adjacent to the Renaissance Center on Hart Plaza. Local tours include Diamond Jack's River Tours [19]. Chartered tours are also available.
  • Detroit's Night Life includes a multitude of clubs throughout the metropolitan area.
  • Detroit's Vibrant, Underground Arts Scene Detroit is home to over 80 galleries, with artists hailing from around the world. Artists are attracted to Detroit due to its abundance of raw, under-utilized industrial space and its inspiring environment of pre-depression era buildings.
  • Detroit's Music Scene The Detroit sound is the sound of the world. It is shaped by Detroit's unique past, its cultural diversity, its energy and its future. Detroit's public information campaign, "The World is Coming, Get in the Game" features an online tour of this music scene. Keep in mind that unlike some cities, there is no central entertainment district (Greektown only partially counts) and many up and coming groups play at venues scattered throughout the area.
  • International Freedom Festival [20] Begins the last week of June.
  • Motown Winter Blast [21] Held in January or February in Campus Martius Park, includes ice skating, concerts, and a street party in Greektown.
  • North America International Auto Show [22] Cobo Hall, Detroit. NAIAS is held in January.
  • Spirit of Detroit Thunderfest [23] Hydoplane races on the Detroit River. Mid-July.
  • Theater See a performance, Detroit's theaters include the Fox Theater, Fisher Theater, Masonic Theater, Gem Theater & Century Club, Detroit Opera House, and Orchestral Hall.
  • The Detroit Science Center, 5020 John R Street Detroit, MI 48202-4045, [24]. Open Weekdays 9am-3pm; Weekends 10am-10pm. The Detroit Science Center includes over 25 hands on exhibits offering live interactive science demonstrations in the Discovery Theater. Always an excellent place to take the kids, as it was my favorite place to go on field trips. $.


Learn

Located in Ann Arbor, about 45 miles west of Detroit, the University of Michigan ranks as one of America's best. Former alumni include President Gerald Ford and Google co-founder Larry Page. Others include Wayne State University (alumni include legendary White House Correspondent Helen Thomas and comedian/actress Lily Tomlin), University of Detroit-Mercy, Lawrence Technological University, Oakland University, Oakland Community College which is one of the largest Community Colleges in Michigan, Eastern Michigan University, Marygrove College, and College for Creative Studies.

The Detroit area has many civic and professional organizations. The world headquarters for the Society for Automotive Engineers (SAE) is in Troy, MI and the Center for Automotive Research (CAR) is headquartered in Ann Arbor, MI. Others include the Detroit Economic Club, the Detroit Athletic Club, the Greening of Detroit to promote urban forestry (tree planting), the Detroit Riverfront Conservancy, Detroit Renaissance, and Detroit Economic Growth Association (DEGA), and more.

The International Academy, an all International Baccalaureate school (a public, tuition-free consortium high school operated by Bloomfield Hills Schools which consistently ranks among the top 10 public high schools in the nation by Newsweek magazine), Cranbrook Schools (an exclusive private boarding school and academy), the Eton Academy, and Henry Ford Academy are some of outstanding secondary schools that are located in the area.

Work

Some of the major companies which have headquarters or a significant presence in metro Detroit include GM, Ford, Chrysler, Volkswagen of America, Comerica, Rock Financial/Quicken Loans, Kelly Services, Borders Group, Dominos, American Axle, DTE Energy, Compuware, Covansys, TRW, BorgWarner, ArvinMeritor, United Auto Group, Pulte Homes, Taubman Centers, Guardian Glass, Lear Seating, Masco, General Dynamics Land Systems, Delphi, AT&T, EDS, Microsoft, IBM, Google, Verizon, National City Bank, Delta Air Lines, Bank of America, and Raymond James, Coopers & Lybrand, Ernst & Young, the FBI, and more.

Buy

This is only a small list of shops and even though they are listed here, their info is brief. Make sure to check out the district articles for more.

  • Eastern Market [25] 2934 Russell St. Historic Farmers Market. Hours 7 AM - 5 PM. Monday-Saturday. Closed Sundays.
  • John K. King Books [26] 901 W. Lafayette, 313-961-0622 One of the best used bookstores in America with over 500,000 books in stock.
  • Pure Detroit [27] Detroit Souvenirs. Stores inside the Renaissance Center, the Fisher Building, and the Guardian Building.
  • Riverfront Shops [28] Detroit. Inside the GM Renaissance Center Winter Garden.

Eat

Greektown

Detroit is home to many American classics including the Coney Island Hotdog, Sanders Bumpy Cakes, Dominos Pizza, Little Caesars Pizza, Better Made Potato Chips, and Vernor's Ginger Ale. (Vernor's Ginger Ale shares the distinction as America's oldest soft drink with Hire's Root Beer).

Explore Detroit's Greektown, with its Greek restaurants and shops surrounding the Greektown Casino. Detroit's Mexicantown is known for Mexican cuisine at restaurants such as Mexican Village, Evie's Tamales, El Zocalo and Xochimilco. Restaurants, bakeries, and shops are located on Vernor Highway, on both the east and west sides of the Interstate 75 service drive. Hamtramck is famous for its Polish cuisine and bakeries. Choose to dine in elegance at one of Detroit's many fine restaurants a sample of which include the Coach Insignia atop the Renaissance Center Downtown, the Whitney House restaurant in Midtown, or the Opus One in the New Center.

  • Small plates Detroit, 1521 Broadway Street Detroit, MI 48226-2114, (313) 963-0497, [29]. 12:00am - 2:00am (verify). As the name suggest, the plates are small but the food is good. This small restaurant is a good spot to sample and share diner with a few guest. With good Brick oven pizza, and a full bar this little gem is a solid dining spot. $.


Drink

Vernor's Ginger Ale, created by Detroit pharmacist James Vernor, shares the distinction as America's oldest soft drink with Hire's Rootbeer. A local favorite, Detroiters pour Vernor's over ice cream. Also try Faygo soft drinks, another former Detroit based soft drink company. Detroiters enjoy Michigan Wines[30]. A family of GM heritage, the Fisher family Coach Wines are served at the Coach Insignia Restaurant atop the GM Renaissance Center. The Detroit area also hosts a number of microbreweries [31].

  • Union Street Salon, 4145 Woodward Avenue, (313) 831-3965, [32]. 11:30pm - 2am. Union Street’s building dates back to the early 1900’s when a hardware store/auto parts store were part of a thriving Woodward Avenue. Across the street is the Garden Bowl and the Majestic Theatre built in 1918 and remains in operation. The menu is a creative fusion of American, European, and Asian inspired dishes. The full bar, and knowledge bat stall will help you concoct drinks that only Hunter S Thompson would dare to order. The croud is a good cross section of regulars - the hip, urban crowd, the theater crowd as well as university professionals and students. If you are a food adventurer and not afraid of a little spice -which means a LOT!!- try the Dragon's Eggs they are chicken breast stuffed with Gorgonzola cheese fried and dipped in the insanely hot rasta sauce. Served on a bed of caesar salad. To quell the inferno you may want to order a side of Ranch or blue cheese to dip them in. The staff is a very friendly group of area locals that can point you in the direction of just about anything your looking for from directions to blind pig parties to the break of dawn along with the recreation additives that can make a long night a fun night. $5 00- $20.00.
  • The Bronx Bar, 4476 2nd Ave Detroit, MI 48201, (313) 832-8464, [33]. ? - 2am. As my friends and I have nick named this place "The darkest bar on the planet." The Bronx is a dive bar by any scale, however the drinks very effective, the Pool table works and the jukebox has depth. This is a place to go to relax knock back a few with your buddies, or an ugly date you just do not really want to look at and enjoy. However watch where you park your car, the last time I was their back in 2007 the parking lot across the street is not public and will tow you car after the businesses in the strip mall close. Also there are a lot of break ins in the area when so hide your valuables. Also PBR is 1$ Also enjoy the unique experience of coming out of a bar at 2am and blinking because it's so bright outside. $.
  • Centaur bar, 2233 Park Ave. Detroit, MI 48201, (313) 963-4040, [34]. 4:00 pm to 2:00 am. This place is Detroit’s best martini bar, sports and entertainment district. (which is pretty small sadly.) This place has amazing architecture, swank lounge areas, masterful chefs, and choice of 21 specialty martinis changes seasonally. Always a good spot to stop at before a Tigers game, and you will need to stop here to drown your sorrows in after watching the Detroit Lions play a game. No baseball hats are allowed on non-game days. $.
  • The Town Pump Tavern, 100 West Montcalm Street, [35]. 11:00am - 2:00am. Located steps away from Comerica Park, Ford Field, the Fox Theatre and the Fillmore Theatre. this watering hole is a good place to start start out at before a game or concert. They offer an extensive beer list with 18 beers on tap, and a full kitchen serving until 11:00 pm every evening. They have live music after home Lions and Tigers games, and DJs on the weekends. $.


Sleep

This is only a small list of hotels and even though they are listed here, their info is brief. Make sure to check out the district articles for more.

With plenty of luxurious of accommodations, the Detroit are includes many fine hotels to fit all types of needs. Whether it is the riverfront ambiance of the Detroit Omni, or the old world elegance of the newly restored Westin Book-Cadillac. For a mix of the urban/suburban flair try the international style Westin Southfield-Detroit Hotel.

Economy

  • Comfort Inn Downtown Detroit Hotel. 1999 E. Jefferson Ave. Tel: +1 313 567-8888. Fax: +1 313 567-5842. On Jefferson Avenue - approximately 1/2 mile east of the Renaissance Center and 1 mile from the Cobo Conference Center, Joe Louis Arena, among other downtown attractions of Detroit, Comerica Park (Tigers Baseball) and the new Ford Field (Lions Football) are only 2.5 miles from the hotel. [36]
  • Milner Hotel, 1538 Centre St, +1 313 963-3950, [37]. Located in downtown Detroit.

Mid-range

  • Fort Shelby Hotel and Conference Center Doubltree. 525 West Lafayette Blvd., Detroit. Historic hotel, opened after renovation in 2008.
  • Hilton Garden Inn Detroit Downtown [38] Near stadiums, Greektown, restaurants.

Splurge

  • The Atheneum Suite Hotel [39] 1000 Brush Avenue, Detroit. +1 313 962-2323. Luxury hotel, stunning Greco-Roman contemporary in the heart of downtown's Greektown, near stadiums, accommodates large conferences.
  • Detroit Marriott at the Renaissance Center [40] Contemporary luxury hotel, overlooks the spectacular International Riverfront with many restaurants including Coach Insignia rooftop restaurant, shops, and 100,000 sq. ft. of meeting space. This is the tallest hotel in the Western Hemisphere, a world-class facility. This facility connects to the elevated rail system known as the People Mover which encircles the downtown area. Near Cobo Hall Convention Center, cruise ship dock, stadiums, Greektown, casinos, museums, Windsor, and area attractions. Guests have included Ronald Reagan.
  • Hotel St. Regis Detroit [41] Luxury hotel in stately European styled elegance, casual, old-world feel, intimate setting, urban location, fine restaurant, La Musique - Cajun steakhouse, private fitness center, and 10,000 sq. ft. of meeting space in the historic New Center [42] area with Cadillac Place, adjoins the beautiful Fisher Theatre [43], a National Historic Landmark, featuring Broadway shows, behind is Cuisine (French) Restaurant. Nearby are Ford Hospital, Wayne State University, Motor City Casino, and downtown.
  • Inn at 97 Winder.[44]. 97 Winder St., Detroit. Elegant, luxurious, Victorian mansion in downtown just two blocks from Comerica Park.
  • Inn at Ferry Street [45] Detroit. A collection of luxurious Victorian bed & breakfasts lining Ferry St. in a historic district downtown. Adjacent to the Detroit Institute of Arts.
  • Omni Detroit Hotel at Riverplace, 1000 Riverplace, +1 313-259-9500 (, fax: +1 313-259-3744), [46]. Historic luxury hotel with fine restaurants, spectacular waterfront location, intimate setting, 8,000 sq. ft. of meeting space. Near GM World Headquarters, Greektown, casinos, and Windsor, Ontario.
  • Westin Book-Cadillac Hotel [47] 1114 Washington Blvd., Detroit. The city's historic flagship luxury hotel, European elegance, downtown location, world-class facility with attached parking garage. Guests have included Presidents Herbert Hoover, Franklin D. Roosevelt, Harry S. Truman, Dwight D. Eisenhower, John F. Kennedy, and many celebrities.

Contact

  • Detroit Convention and Visitor's Bureau [48].

Telephone

AT&T is the incumbent landline telephone provider, and Detroit is serviced by all the major mobile telephone companies (Verizon, AT&T, T-Mobile)

Newspapers

Detroit has two newspapers, the Detroit Free Press and the Detroit News. Both newspapers are available throughout the city. The free weekly MetroTimes covers news, arts & entertainment.

Stay safe

As with most urban areas, precautions should be taken when out after dark: stay in groups; do not carry large amounts of money; and avoid seedy neighborhoods. The overall crime rate in downtown Detroit is below the national average. Stick to major freeways when possible and try to avoid smaller streets through unfamiliar neighborhoods. It is important as to how you carry yourself, doing this properly could easily keep you from getting mugged.

Contrary to some people's perceptions, downtown Detroit is generally well-policed and among the safest parts of the city.[49] Crimes can and do occur in downtown, but exercising common sense will go a long way toward keeping you and your valuables safe.

Sporting events, festivals and other large public events are always heavily policed and very safe. Sporadic crime events, mostly alcohol-related and involving groups of youths, have been reported at some of these events but they are by far the exception.

Unfortunately for the music-lover, much of the current music scene is scattered between downtown venues like the Majestic Theater/Magic Stick complex, places in Hamtramck, and suburban venues in places like Royal Oak. So you will have to drive, navigate the city at night, and typically park on the street. Some venues, such as Harpo's on the east side, are in unsafe neighborhoods. Always use caution and ask around before going to a particular venue. People at record stores, guitar shops, "cool" clothing stores, and the like often visit and know which venues are easy to get to and reasonably safe.

Cope

Detroit has a modern freeway system that is easy to navigate. But be advised that suburban Detroit drivers tend to drive fast and defensively. The flow of traffic on a freeway is routinely ten miles over the speed limit, and weaving in and out of lanes is standard practice, often times without signaling. If you are driving the posted speed limit in the fast lane, the driver behind you may have no qualms about tailgating you, so if you plan on driving slowly, stay in the far right lane. Detroit Metropolitan Airport has a conveniently attached Westin Hotel and conference center. The Airport is among the most modern in the United States with both international and domestic gates in the World Terminal. Galegroup's Hour Media LLC publishes a full color guest guide found in hotels in the metro Detroit area. Visitors may request a guest packet from the Detroit Convention and Visitors Bureau. The Convention and Visitors Bureau sponsors Discover Detroit TV which airs Mondays at 5:30 PM on Detroit Public Television. The city has ample parking garages, valet, and pay-to-park lots near major attractions. Laurel Park Place Mall in Livonia has an attached Marriott Hotel. The Westin Hotel at the Southfield Town Center is centrally located for those needing access to the entire metropolitan region.

Get out

Michigan

Although Detroit itself provides the majority of the region's visitor attractions, the entire Southeast Michigan area is large and diverse and contains a great wealth of hot spots and attractions that are also well worth visiting.

  • Ann Arbor - Home to the University of Michigan [50], Ann Arbor offers many attractions of a self-enclosed small city. A thriving downtown, lots of culture, and plenty of students. Cannabis possession in this city outside of University of Michigan property is only a 25 dollar fine, making this one of the most liberal cities in Michigan. Canoeing is a favorite pastime on the Huron River, available through Metro parks [51] near Ann Arbor. Additionally, the city boasts the number one rated Ann Arbor Street Art Fair [52] which attracts over 500,000 attendees from across the nation each July. Enjoy the Beach at Kensington Metropark, or winter skiing at nearby Mt. Holly, and Brighton.
  • Dearborn - Detroit's suburb to the Southwest and home of Ford Motor Company, Dearborn, has a leading attraction, The Henry Ford (the Henry Ford Museum & Greenfield Village) [53] a large historical and entertainment complex, and the Automotive Hall of Fame. Dearborn has the second largest Middle-Eastern population in the World, with mosques being a common sight and a wide selection of Middle-Eastern food and shopping. Detroit's public information campaign, "The World is Coming, Get in the Game" has created an online tour (see section "Do" for the link) of Dearborn's cultural scene.
  • Flint - The home of the modern labor union movement in the US. While not as tourist-friendly as Ann Arbor, Flint has a great art scene for a city of its size and is much less pretentious.
  • Grand Rapids - Michigan's second largest city. With a skyline filled with construction cranes, many believe Grand Rapids is Michigan's future. With a great, clean downtown area and the city's proximity to Lake Michigan, Grand Rapids is a grand experience waiting to happen.
  • Lake St. Clair and the St. Clair River - Waterfront activities and living are among the luxuries of the metropolitan Detroit area. Experience cruises and boating on beautiful Lake St. Clair. The St. Clair River connects Lake St. Clair to Lake Huron. In the quiet town of St. Clair, along the St. Clair River, dine at the Voyager Seafood restaurant at 525 South Riverside. Enjoy the charm of a small town lifestyle in a major metropolitan area in and around Lake St. Clair's Anchor Bay [54]. Visitors to downtown Detroit may reserve a dock at Tri-Centennial State Park and Harbor [55]. Or enjoy a Great Lakes cruise [56].
  • Royal Oak - Home to the beautifully landscaped Detroit Zoo, Royal Oak is a gay friendly suburb outside of Detroit which boasts a classy night scene with exciting dining and a diverse avant-garde bar culture.
  • Troy - Troy, a suburb of Detroit, contains the Somerset Collection, one of the largest upscale malls in the Midwest. Visit Nordstom, Macy's, Henri Bendel, Ralph Lauren/Polo, Neiman Marcus, Saks Fifth Avenue, Tiffany & Co, Barney's New York, and more than 180 other specialty shops. Follow Big Beaver Road east as it becomes the Metropolitan Parkway toward Metropolitan Beach on beautiful Lake St. Clair.

Ohio

  • Toledo, Ohio -- about an hour south on the DT Expressway (I-75). This mid-sized city is on the edge of Lake Erie. The city is a good destination for architecture buffs.

Ontario

  • Windsor, Ontario, Canada -- lies just across the Ambassador Bridge or through the Detroit-Windsor Tunnel, which is located right next to the Renaissance Center (good to use if you see traffic backed up onto I-75). This heavily trafficked border crossing has shaped Windsor more than anything else; well-maintained, walkable streets, shops and restaurants, Caesars Windsor casino, and adult entertainment. The lower drinking age (19) draws young Americans and ensures a vibrant club scene on weekends. Windsor provides great views of Detroit's skyline, especially on summer nights from waterfront Dieppe Park. Crossing the border requires a passport.


Routes through Detroit
FlintFerndale  N noframe S  MelvindaleToledo
Ann ArborDearborn  W noframe E  Harper WoodsPort Huron
LansingRedford  W noframe E  END


This is a usable article. It has information for getting in as well as some complete entries for restaurants and hotels. An adventurous person could use this article, but please plunge forward and help it grow!





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