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{{quickbar
 
| image=[[Image:Catedral de San Cristobal.jpg|250px]]
 
| image=[[Image:Catedral de San Cristobal.jpg|250px]]
 
| location=[[Image:LocationCuba.png|noframe|250px]]
 
| location=[[Image:LocationCuba.png|noframe|250px]]
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| religion=Nominally 85% Roman Catholic prior to Castro assuming power; Protestants, Jehovah's Witnesses, Jews, Muslims, and Santería are also represented
 
| religion=Nominally 85% Roman Catholic prior to Castro assuming power; Protestants, Jehovah's Witnesses, Jews, Muslims, and Santería are also represented
 
| electricity=110V/60Hz or 220V/60Hz (North American, European, or Italian plug)
 
| electricity=110V/60Hz or 220V/60Hz (North American, European, or Italian plug)
| callingcode= 53
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| callingcode=+53
 
| tld=.cu
 
| tld=.cu
 
| timezone=UTC -5
 
| timezone=UTC -5
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[[Image:cu-map.gif|thumb|400px|Map of Cuba]]
 
[[Image:cu-map.gif|thumb|400px|Map of Cuba]]
  
* '''[[Western Cuba]]'''
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* '''[[Western Cuba]]''' – Pinar del Rio, Havana and Isla de la Juventud
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* '''[[Central Cuba]]''' – Matanzas, Villa Clara, Cienfuegos, Sancti Spiritus and Ciego de Avila
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* '''[[Eastern Cuba]]''' – Camaguey, Las Tunas, Holguin, Santiago de Cuba, Granma and Guantanamo
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==Cities==
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* [[Havana]] – cosmopolitan capital with a swinging nightlife
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* [[Baracoa]] – Cuba's first capital, a quaint beach-side town
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* [[Pinar del Rio]] – center of the cigar industry
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* [[Santa Clara (Cuba)|Santa Clara]] – home of the Che Guevara mausoleum
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* [[Santiago de Cuba]] – coastal city rich in Caribbean influence
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* [[Trinidad (Cuba)|Trinidad]] – World Heritage Site with charming, colonial-era buildings
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==Other destinations==
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* [[Baracoa]] – a quaint beach town where in the far east of the country
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* [[Cayo Largo]] – a small island with nudist facilities
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* [[Holguin]] – province of approximately 1,000,000, situated in central eastern Cuba about one hour's drive from numerous resorts on the north shore.  Large airport receiving flights from Canada, the United Kingdom, and Europe.
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* [[Jardines del Rey]] – beach resorts including [[Cayo Coco]] and [[Cayo Guillermo]]
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* [[Maria la Gorda]] – a tiny village with some snorkeling and diving options
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* [[Varadero]] – a major beach resort, east of Havana
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* [[Viñales]] – rolling hills and mountain scenery
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==Understand==
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[[Image:Che_Statue.jpg|thumb|200px|Statue of Che Guevara above his mausoleum, [[Santa Clara (Cuba)|Santa Clara]].]]
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Before the 1959 Revolution, Cuba was a popular tourist destination for [[United States of America|United States]] citizens. Since the Revolution, Cuba has been subjected to a trade and travel embargo by the United States. While travel between the two neighbors is restricted, it is still possible, though illegal for US citizens.
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After 1959, Cuban tourism was mostly for Cubans only, and the facilities were not renewed until the 1990s, when Cuba lost financial backing from the defunct Soviet Union and opened its doors to foreign tourism. Now, many Europeans, Canadians, and even U.S. visitors come to the island.  In the typical tourist regions like Varadero and Holguin, a lot of modern 3-star to 5-star hotels are available, while in less popular tourist regions, visitors are still able to rent rooms in many Cuban homes (called [[casa particular|casas particulares]]).
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Due to several long-standing factors (e.g. bureaucratic ineffectiveness, the U.S. embargo, lack of resources, and the loss of Soviet subsidies), much of the country's infrastructure is in need of repair. In major tourist destinations, there will generally be few problems with either power or water, although such outages may occur. Outages have been common in Cuba, except in tourist facilities that have a generator. 2006 was designated the Year of the Energetic Revolution in Cuba, and many small generators have been installed in an attempt to avoid blackouts.  Many tourist accommodations offer 220V as well as 110V power sources.
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===News===
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* '''Granma''' has a [http://www.granma.cubasi.cu/ daily] edition and an [http://www.granma.cu/ingles/index.html/ international] version.
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* '''Juventud Rebelde''', [http://www.jrebelde.cubasi.cu].
 +
 
 +
* '''Cuba Vision''', [http://www.cubavision.cubaweb.cu/portada.asp] is the national television station.
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 +
* '''Radio Reloj''', [http://www.radioreloj.cu] broadcasts news 24 hours and states the time every minute on the minute — ''dos cuarenta y dos minutos''...
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* '''Radio Rebelde''', [http://www.radiorebelde.com.cu], another news radio station.
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 +
Most of the radio stations are available live [http://media-radio.cubasi.cu/ online].
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===Television===
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If you're staying at a hotel or casa particular, it's likely there will be a television, and watching Cuban television is a good place to observe Cuba's unique mix of vibrant culture, sports and controversial politics.
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The Cuban telenovelas are one of the state's key instruments for addressing sexual taboos and educating young people about AIDS, for example.  The locally produced cartoons are the most interesting and uniquely Cuban.  They range from abstract and artsy to informative to entertaining.
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 +
The most famous of the genre is the children's program Elpidio Valdés, which chronicles the adventures of a band of rebels in the 19th century revolt against the Spanish.  The mix of cartoon slapstick humor and images of violent revolution (dashing revolutionaries stealing rifles, blowing up Spanish forts, and sticking pistols into the mouths of goofy Spanish generals) in a program geared at children is simultaneously delightful and disturbing.
 +
 
 +
==Get in==
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''For information specific to [[United States of America|U.S. citizens]] see '''[[Americans in Cuba]]'''
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===Visa and legal issues ===
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A '''tourist visa card''' (visada tarjeta del turista) is necessary for travellers from most nations. This visa, which is really little more than a piece of paper on which you list your vital statistics, costs between 15-25 CUC (or 15-25 Euro), depending on where purchased. It is usually valid for 30 days and can be extended once for another 30 days at any immigration office in Cuba - beyond this you would need a pretty good reason. Canadians are the exception, getting 90 days on arrival and can apply for a 90 day extension. Your passport needs to be valid at least six months past the end of your planned return.
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 +
Regular tourists who renew their 30 day visa are eligible to depart the country (to any destination) and return immediately enjoying a further 60 days (30 days plus a 30 day extension). You are only allowed two consecutive stays in this manner.
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 +
Citizens of Antigua and Barbuda (28 days), Barbados (28 days), Benin, Bosnia and Herzegovina, CIS (except Ukraine and Uzbekistan), Dominica, Grenada (60 days), Liechtenstein (90 days), Macedonia, Malaysia (90 days), Mongolia, Montenegro (90 days), Namibia, Singapore, Slovakia, Saint Kitts & Nevis, Saint Lucia, Saint Vincent and the Grenadines, Serbia (90 days), Turkmenistan who can stay 30 days without visa.
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It is important to note that there is also a '''departure tax''' of CUC 25, to be paid in cash when ''departing'' Cuba. This tax is not well publicised but it is essential to remember it. You will run into significant difficulties if you do not have enough cash to pay this tax when leaving the country. An ATM is available at the airport but these facilities are not as reliable in Cuba as in other places.
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On arrival you must already have a legal housing booking (hotel or [[casa particular]]) for at least three days. If you've written in the name of a good hotel on the tourist card, the officials should rarely ask for proof.
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 +
Cuban [http://www.aduana.islagrande.cu/mapa3.htm customs] can be strict, though they sometimes go easy on tourists.
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 +
===By plane===
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[[Image:La Habana airport.JPG|thumb|right|Jose Marti International Airport]]
 +
'''Jose Martí International Airport''' outside Havana is the main gateway and is served by major airlines from points in [[Canada]], [[Mexico]], and [[Europe]]. There are also regional flights from other [[Caribbean]] islands. Cuba's national carrier is [http://www.cubana.cu/ '''Cubana de Aviacion'''], connecting the island to a handful of destinations in [[Mexico]], [[South America|South]] and [[Central America]], [[Canada]] and [[Europe]].
 +
 
 +
An official taxi to Havana center costs 15-25 CUC but you can find cheaper (illegal) ones. The cost is roughly 1 CUC per kilometer.
 +
 
 +
There are also regular '''holiday charter''' flights to resorts such as [[Varadero]], and these can sometimes be less expensive than those going to Havana.
 +
 
 +
The airports are all fully-air-conditioned and quite modern, compared to other destinations in the Caribbean, offer good medical care in case of problems, and are usually relatively hassle free.
 +
 
 +
===By boat===
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There are no regular ferries or boats to Cuba from foreign ports, although some cruise liners do visit. Yachters are expected to anchor at the public marinas. Most ports are closed and tourists are not permitted to walk around them. Private vessels may enter at Marina Hemingway in [[Havana]] or Marina Acua in [[Varadero]]. Entry requires a US passport, but there are no visa requirements.  Expect to hand out several $10 bills to facilitate your entry.
 +
 
 +
==Get around==
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 +
===By bus===
 +
[http://www.viazul.cu/ '''Víazul'''] is Cuba's hard currency bus line and is by far the best choice of public transportation to tour the island.  They run comfortable air-conditioned long-distance coaches with washrooms and televisions to most places of interest to tourists.  The buses are getting a bit grubby, but they are reliable and punctual.  Complete schedules can be found on the Viazul website (the Varadero - Santa Clara - Cienfuegos - Trinidad and return service is missing from the website but runs daily).  The buses can be used theoretically by anyone, including Cubans, but in reality, few Cubans can afford the convertable peso fares.  Reservations can be made in advance, but are usually unnecessary except at peak travel times.  Do not waste your time making an on-line reservation on the website -- that feature rarely works.  Refreshments are not served, despite what the website says, but the buses stop for meal breaks at highway restaurants with bad food.  (Bring your own food!)  The buses are often over air conditioned, so bring along something warm to wear.  Note that most westbound buses from Santiago de Cuba run overnight.
 +
 
 +
Astro is the bus line that most Cubans use.  Most seats are only available for sale to Cubans, who pay in their local currency, but two seats are reserved for anyone, including foreigners, wishing to pay (a much higher fare) in convertable pesos.  This fare is slightly cheaper than Viazul.  The seats reserved for Cubans are always sold out, sometimes weeks in advance.  Astro recently renewed their fleet with 300 new Chinese coaches that are as confortable as Viazul (without the washroom).  Although the new buses have proven to be unreliable and often break down, they are still better than the old buses that Astro used to run.  Astro has a much more extensive network than Viazul, so it can be useful for tourists.  Schedules change often and should always be confirmed in advance.  Reservations are essential.  If the two convertable peso seats are unsold, they will be given to Cubans on a standby list.  For this reason, many travellers try to avoid Astro when possible so that they don't take a seat away from a Cuban, who may have been waiting for days and cannot afford any other means of transportation.
 +
 
 +
There are also local provincial buses, consisting of overcrowded old beat-up eastern European buses that may or may not be running. 
 +
 
 +
It is also possible to travel between some popular tourist destinations, such as Havana and Varadero, on special '''tourist minibuses''' carrying 4-5 people. The cost is a few dollars more but highly recommended if you are not planning to sleep the whole distance - plus you can ask the driver to stop along the way!
 +
 
 +
===By taxi===
 +
 
 +
Official '''taxis''' are pretty expensive for long distances. Between [[Havana]] and [[Viñales]], for example, will run about CUC 90-100, although this can work out cheaper than traveling by bus or train if you split the fare between several people. If you're up for a little adventure, you can find some enterprising locals willing to (illegally) play "taxi" with their old car for a little less money.  Be aware that if they get caught, you will have to get out of the car.  Although you will not be in any trouble with the authorities, you may find yourself in the middle of nowhere with no transportation.
 +
 
 +
Taxis are the most convenient way to get around within the big cities. There are several types of taxis, including the official government taxis, the private and potentially unlicensed "yank tanks", and the small three-wheeled coco-taxis. They're fairly abundant and not hard to find - they tend to group in front of large hotels, but it will usually be cheaper to find one elsewhere.
 +
 
 +
===By car===
 +
{{infobox|Yank Tanks|[[Image:Cuba_CarMaintenance.jpg|noframe|right|200px|Classic car maintenance on the streets of Havana.]]
 +
 
 +
You will find an unusually large number of old U.S.-made cars on the street.  Popularly known as "Yank Tanks," these are pre-revolution imports from the 1950s that have been nursed along for half a century, because the Soviet-made cars available during the Cold War were too scarcely allocated for most Cubans to buy (and other cars remain too expensive today).}}
 +
 
 +
In Cuba, all vehicles drive on the right hand side of the road.
 +
 
 +
'''Car rental''' starts from CUC 65 per day (including insurance) plus the cost of a full tank of gasoline. The refundable deposits start around CUC 200.  Rental cars are for the most part fairly new, imported European or Asian models. Any traffic tickets received are noted on a rental car sheet and are deducted from your rental deposit.  Note that if you are involved in a serious traffic accident involving injury or death, you will be detained in Cuba until the legal process sorts things out, which can take months.  For this reason, many countries advise their citizens not to rent cars in Cuba.
 +
 
 +
Generally traffic is light, especially away from Havana. Outside of towns and cities traffic is usually very light, with no cars for miles. Be warned - you also share the highways with cyclists (sometimes going the wrong way, and at night usually without lights) and horse-drawn vehicles.  Also note that the Autopista (the main highway running down the center of the country) is crossed at occasional intervals by railway tracks - take care to slow down before going over to avoid damage to the tires or suspension.  Many of these have a stop sign ("PARE" in Spanish) which you should carefully heed - or risk a fine of CUC 30, even if no train is coming.
 +
 
 +
Expect to encounter checkpoints when traveling in the interior of the country.
 +
 
 +
Gasoline costs CUC 0.85/Regular, CUC 0.95/Special and 1.10/Super per litre.  Tourist rental cars are not supposed to use regular.
 +
 
 +
===Hitchhiking and the "Amarillo"===
 +
 
 +
The Cuban government's system for facilitating hitchhiking is by far the most economical way for foreigners to travel in Cuba, though a flexible schedule and good Spanish are a must.  Known as "El Amarillo" ("the yellow guy") for the yellowy-beige uniforms of its administrators, the system consists of points along main routes where certain vehicles are required to stop and pick up hitchhikers.  Amarillo points ("el punto amarillo") along major highways are often full service rest stops for hitchhikers, with water, peso-priced food, and a 24 hour indoor waiting area. 
 +
 
 +
To use the system within cities, just keep your eyes peeled for a man or woman in a yellow / beige uniform standing along the road near a line of people.  Tell the official where you need to go, and wait.  To travel long distances, you need to get to the "punto amarillo" on the edge of the city in the direction you're going.  Ask a local for help on the best way to do that.  Then as you pass through cities, ask what bus or taxi to take to get to the "punto amarillo" on the outgoing road at the opposite extreme of the city.  This can be tricky, and it's often worth it to take a local taxi.  If you can find a Cuban to accompany you on your journey, their help will be invaluable.
 +
 
 +
In daytime hours, when the amarillo is present, you pay a nominal amount of money (approx. 20 pesos from one city to the next) to the official when you find a ride.  The money all goes to the government; drivers don't get any.  As a result, it's much easier to travel long distances at night, when the amarillo has gone home and drivers can make some money picking up hitchhikers. 
 +
 
 +
Of course, it's always possible to hitchhike just by sticking out your thumb to passing cars, but be prepared to give the driver 20-50 pesos for a long ride.
 +
 
 +
Most of the rides you get will be in the back of large trucks, open to the weather.  This is an exciting and beautiful way to travel the Cuban countryside.  Though an accident would obviously be very dangerous for passengers, school kids, older adults, and parents with small children using this system every day.  Make sure to bring protection against sun and rain and, if traveling at night, wind and cold.
 +
 
 +
Hitchhiking is the only system where you can travel for Cuban prices without paying a tourist premium.  Given that transportation is one of a tourist's biggest expenses in Cuba, this can make your money go much farther.  Tell folks you're a student (not a tourist) to avoid funny looks and price gouging.
 +
 
 +
===By train===
 +
The main train line in the country runs between [[Havana]] and [[Santiago de Cuba]], with major stops at [[Santa Clara (Cuba)|Santa Clara]] and [[Camagüey]].  Trains also run to other cities such as [[Cienfuegos]], Manzanillo, Morón, [[Sancti Spiritus]], and [[Pinar del Rio]].
 +
 
 +
There is one reliable train in Cuba: the overnight Tren Francès between Havana and Santiago de Cuba, which runs on alternate days.  It uses equipment that was formerly operated on the Trans-Europe Express, and donated to Cuba by France a few years ago (hence the name).  There are first class and special first class seats on this train (the special seats are better and more expensive), but no sleepers.  If only one train in Cuba is running, this will be it.
 +
 
 +
All other trains in Cuba are unreliable.  The equipment is often in poor condition, breakdowns are common, and when they occur, you can be stuck for the better part of the day (or night) waiting for a replacement engine.  There are no services on the trains, so bring plenty of food and water with you.  Trains are frequently cancelled.  Some trains offer first class seats (don't expect too much); others have second class seats, which can be very uncomfortable.  Schedules are at best optimistic and should always be checked in advance of travel.  There are no sleepers on overnight routes.
 +
 
 +
If you are still thinking of taking a train, other than the Tren Francès, you should know that many Cubans prefer to hitchhike than take the train.
 +
 
 +
If you are still determined to take a train, approximate schedules are given under the different city descriptions.  Foreginers must pay much higher fares (in convertable pesos) than the locals do.  Tickets are roughly two-thirds what Viazul charges.  Theft is a problem so watch your luggage!
 +
 
 +
===By plane===
 +
 
 +
The fastest and most comfortable way to cover larger distances is on either of the Cuban airlines, [http://www.cubana.cu/ '''Cubana de Aviación'''] or [http://www.aero-caribbean.com/ '''Aero Caribbean'''].
 +
 
 +
 
 +
===By bike===
 +
 
 +
Calm roads and beautiful scenery make Cuba an ideal country for biking. You will have to bring your own bike as bikes suitable for trekking are not readily available in Cuba. Roads in most places in Cuba are reasonable, but it may still be a good idea to bring a mountain bike. Mountain bikes are stronger and allow for better driving off-road. Make sure to bring all spare parts you might need along the way, since they will not be available in Cuba. As casas pariculares are available even in relatively small towns it is easy to plan an itinerary. Food for on the road can often be obtained locally for cheap Cuban Pesos, but make sure if you travel through more remote areas to carry enough food (and water!). Bikers are often met with enthusiasm and interest; when taking a break you will often be approached by curious locals. It is possible to take bikes on a tourbus, like "Viazul", to cover larger distances. You have to arrange a personal agreement with the driver however, who will expect a little bonus in return. It is also possible to take bikes on trains and even to hitch with bikes (wave some convertible pesos to approaching drivers to catch their attention).
 +
 
 +
 
 +
===By boat===
 +
 
 +
There are two main island groups to explore along the southern shore of Cuba. Your sailing area from the two main bases, Cienfuegos or Trinidad incorporates the Canarreos Archipelago and the Juventud Islands or Jardines de la Reina Archipelago. [http://www.windward-islands.net/ Windward Islands].
 +
 
 +
==Talk==
 +
 
 +
The official language of Cuba is [[Spanish]], although the version here is quite different from that spoken in Spain or Mexico. Cubans tend to swallow the last syllable in a word and generally swallow the 's' sound. Many would argue that it's quite a beautiful dialect.
 +
 
 +
==Buy==
 +
 
 +
===Money===
 +
 
 +
''For information specific to [[United States of America|U.S. citizens]] see '''[[Americans in Cuba]]'''
 +
 
 +
There are two currencies circulating in Cuba, Cuban Pesos (CUP) and Cuban Convertible Pesos (CUC). Prior to November 2004 US dollars were in wide circulation on par with the CUC, but the government discontinued that and they are no longer used.
 +
 
 +
'''CUC''' is the currency most tourists will use in Cuba. It is how you will pay for hotels, official taxis, entry into museums, meals at restaurants, cigars, rum, etc. Conversion into CUC can be done at exchange houses (casa de cambio, or cadeca). These are located in many hotels and in other places throughout the cities. CUC are valued at 28 times the value of CUP. Tourists are permitted to import or export a maxiumum of CUP 100 or CUC 200 at any one time.
 +
 
 +
'''CUP''' are also known as local Pesos and Moneda Nacional (National money). As of Nov 2007, 1 CUC = 28.62 CUP. There is a limited range of goods that can be bought for local pesos, and these are transactions carried out in agricultural markets or from street vendors. Fruits, vegetables, fresh juices and snacks from street vendors are among the things CUP can buy. Because the products that can be purchased with CUP are limited, it is not a good idea to change more than CUC 5-10 into CUP at a time, as the CUP will last for a good while.
 +
 
 +
====Exchanging currency====
 +
 
 +
Exchanging currency in Cuba can be complicated.
 +
 
 +
Keep in mind that most of your transactions will take place using CUC. [http://www.bc.gov.cu/English/exchange_rate.asp/ Banco Central de Cuba] publishes official exchange rates on its website, or alternatively try [http://www.xe.com/ucc/ XE.com]
 +
 
 +
European and Canadian currency can be exchanged for CUC.  The best rates are at the banks or Cadeca counters, not at the resorts.  There seems to be little difference between the rates offered at the airports and in the cities.  Some other currencies may not be exchangable for CUC.  As of January 2007, US dollars are not being accepted for exchange in official outlets.  Since many US citizens take flights through Canada to get to Cuba, Canadian currency may be the easiest option for American travellers.
 +
 
 +
When changing into CUP, be aware that some places, like hotels, will not change foreign currencies directly into CUP; instead, they will change your currency into CUC and then change your CUC into CUP. You will lose money on each of the exchanges. Any Cadeca should happily change your foreign currency directly into CUP, if you wish.  Be realistic about how much you will need -- it will not be much.
 +
 
 +
====Traveler's Checks====
 +
 
 +
Traveler's checks drawn on American banks are not technically valid in Cuba, though many have had success cashing U.S. traveler's checks at major tourist hotels. American Express checks are difficult to cash due to the likelihood that they were purchased with U.S. dollars. For example, Swiss traveler's checks will be accepted, as long as they are in Swiss francs, even if the checks are made "in licence" of an American bank, as long as the real producer of them is non-American. Visa Traveller's cheques are accepted, though the same caveats about being drawn on an American bank apply.  It's better to bring cash to Cuba; resorts accept Euros, Canadian dollars, British pounds, Swiss francs and Hong Kong yuan currencies without any fees. If backpacking or leaving the resort areas, exchange your currency to CUCs, as foreign currency is not accepted by many locals.  For U.S. dollars, they will charge a penalty of 10%, so it's better to change to Euros, Canadian dollars or Swiss francs before travelling there.
 +
 
 +
====ATMs and Credit cards====
 +
 
 +
ATMs are rare in Cuba, with only a handful found in Havana. Most are linked with either the Mastercard/Cirrus or Visa/Plus interbank systems. U.S.-issued cards will not be accepted. Unlike some national systems, only primary accounts (typically checking) are recognized. Even if you find an ATM and meet the above criteria it still may not have sufficient cash for a large withdrawal - if refused, try again and ask for a smaller amount. 
 +
 
 +
Visa & Mastercard credit cards (of non-US origin) can usually be used, including for cash advances, but places that accept Visa as payment are extremely limited. Credit cards are charged in US dollars plus 11.24% (the 8% exchange difference plus a 3% fee). The best places to attempt to use a credit/Debit card for a cash withdrawl are at the state run Cadecas / Cambios - rather than banks used by Cubans, using the 'red' (company name) ATMs. Debit cards are generally not accepted, although this does vary from card to card. 
 +
 
 +
Many banks will tell you that your debit card will be accepted in Cuba when in fact it will not.  Do not rely on ATMs for cash as you may be used to in other countries. Have enough currency or travellers cheques when you enter the country to get by, if necessary.
 +
 
 +
====Banks====
 +
 
 +
Banks often close at 3pm, and earlier on the last day of the month. '''Cadecas''' (exchange bureaus) may be open longer, especially in hotels.  When going to a bank allow enough time as service is usually slow and many people may already be waiting. Foreigners may get preferred treatment in exchange for a small tip.
 +
 
 +
You must bring your passport in case you want to exchange traveler's checks or make a credit card advance, although cash can be changed without a passport. Exchange rates do vary from place to place, and some hotels do give significantly worse exchange rates than the banks.
 +
 
 +
===Merchandise===
 +
 
 +
As in any third world country, most of the merchandise available is designed for tourists to take back home. The biggest Cuban exports for tourists are rum, cigars, and coffee, all of which are available at government-owned stores (including the duty free store at the airport) or on the streets. For genuine merchandise, you should pay the official price at the legal stores.
 +
 
 +
Another thing Cubans do well is '''music''' such as salsa, son, and Afro-Cubano. You can purchase CDs or tapes anywhere, but paying the average cost of US$20 to assures you of quality and supports the artists.
 +
 
 +
If you are planning to take big quantities (several boxes or more) of '''cigars''' with you, be sure you have purchased them officially from an approved shop that gives you proper purchase documentation. Foreign nationals are allowed to export up to 24 cigars (generally 25 to a box) without special permits or receipts, but the export of 25 or more requires official receipts.  If you buy cigars cheap on streets and you don't have official purchase invoice then your cigars may/will be confiscated.  Also, be advised that any purchase of Cuban cigars outside government-approved stores (even in resorts) has the potential to be fake, and that the "cigar factory worker who steals from the factory" does not exist in any appreciable quantities.  If you find a "deal" from a street vendor, it's incredibly likely you are getting fakes, some of which may not even be made of tobacco.  Always ensure, no matter where you buy, that the Cuban government origin warranty stamp is properly affixed to the cigar box.  Americans are no longer allowed to bring Cuban cigars back into the U.S., regardless of their value, if they have an OFAC license, or even if they were given as a gift. It is also illegal for Americans to smoke or buy Cuban cigars anywhere in the world.
 +
 
 +
Officially you'll need permission to export '''paintings''' that are larger than 70cm/side. When you buy artwork from approved shop then they'll give you also the required document, that consists of one paper and one stamp that will be glued on back of your painting. Serial numbers on the stamp and paper must match. Cost of the document is about CUC 2-3. In reality, it is possible that no one will be interested in your paintings.
 +
 
 +
===Medical Tourism===
 +
Cuba has long been a popular Medical Tourism destination for patients worldwide that seek high quality medical care at low costs.  According to the Association of Caribbean States, nearly 20,000 international patients visited Cuba in 2006 for medical care.  Cuba is especially attractive to many Latin American and North American patients given its easy proximity and relaxing environment. 
 +
 
 +
A wide range of medical treatments are provided including joint replacement, cancer treatment, eye surgery, cosmetic surgery and addictions rehabilitation.  Costs are about 60 to 80 percent less than U.S. costs.  For example, [http://www.choicemedicalservices.com '''Choice Medical Services'''] a health tourism provider, provides a hip replacement at leading Cuban hospitals for US$5845
 +
 
 +
==Eat==
 +
 
 +
Being that all restaurants are owned by the government and run by underpaid employees, the food in Cuba is notoriously bland. If you are expecting the fiery pepperpot spiciness found on some of the other Caribbean islands, consider that the national dish in Cuba is rice and beans (moros y christianos). A popular saying goes that the best Cuban food can be found in the U.S. Within Cuba, the best food will generally be found in your '''[[casa particular]]''' or in '''paladares''' (locally owned restaurants in private homes).
 +
 
 +
Black beans are a main staple in Cuban households. Cubans eat mainly pork and chicken for meat. Beef and lobster are controlled by the state, and therefore illegal to sell outside of state owned hotels and restaurants, however special lobster lunch/supper offers are plentiful for tourists. You may see turtle on menus in Paladares, but be aware that they are endangered and eating them is illegal.
 +
 
 +
'''Paladares''' are plentiful, even in the smaller towns. Seating is often limited, so you may need to arrive when they open, usually around 5 or 6pm.  If you are staying in a [[casa particular]] ask your host for recommendations, as the quality of the food can vary substantially between paladares. Only eat in ones that have a printed menu with prices, otherwise you are very likely to pay two to three times as much as you should. That said, several have taken to printing two different menus, one with local prices and one with foreigner prices. Eating in paladares is perfectly legal, but be aware that if you are taken there by a Cuban, you may be charged extra in order to cover commission of the person who brought you.  A supper will cost around 7 or 8 CUC per person.
 +
 
 +
It is difficult to find any restaurants serving breakfast in Cuba outside of resorts; most [[casa particular|casas particulares]] will serve their guests a large breakfast for around 4 CUC per person if requested.
 +
 
 +
A tasty serving of rice, vegetables, plantains, and pork or beef (called a ''cajita'' ["little box" in English]) is an attractive and affordable option, and are generally sold for around US$1 out of people's homes. 
 +
 
 +
You can also find small street vendors selling a variety of foods, typically sandwiches and pizzas for between 2 and 12 CUP. The quality varies from vendor to vendor so when you find a good one take note. Many of these stores are run from people's living rooms, and buying from them is a good way to help provide some extra income to a Cuban family. While these meals are satisfying and cheap, be warned that long lines are common and the vendors are rarely in any rush to see everyone fed quickly.
 +
 
 +
==Drink==
 +
 
 +
Cuban national cocktails include the ''Cuba Libre'' (rum and cola) and the ''Mojito'' (rum, lime, sugar, mint leaves, club soda and ice).
 +
 
 +
If you request a rum in a small country restaurant do not be surprised if it is only available by the bottle. '''Havana Club''' is the national brand and the most popular. Expect to pay $4 for three year old white rum or $8 for seven year old dark rum.
 +
 
 +
'''Cristal''' is a light beer and is available in "dollar" stores where Cubans with CUCs and visitors may shop. Cubans prefer the '''Bucanero Fuerte''', which at 5.5% alcohol is a strong (hence the "fuerte") darker beer.  Both Cristal and Bucanero are brewed by a joint venture with Labatts of Canada, whose beer is the only Cuban beer sold in CUC. A stronger version, '''Bucanero Max''' is also available - primarily available in Havana.
 +
There are also smaller brews, not available everywhere, such as Hatuey and Corona del Mar. These are sold in CUP.
 +
 
 +
==Sleep==
 +
 
 +
If you want to experience something of the real life of Cubans, the best places to stay are [[casa particular|casas particulares]] (private houses licensed to offer lodging services to foreigners). They are cheaper than hotels (average CUC 20/room) and the food (breakfast CUC 3-4, dinner CUC 7-10) is almost always better than you would get in a hotel.  Casas particulares are plentiful even in small towns;  they are somewhat more expensive in Havana than elsewhere.  Note that any service offered by a casa particular other than accommodation, such as driving you to the bus station, will be added to your bill, regardless of whether this is stated up front.  Items such as bottled water supplied with your meal will also have a charge.  Always make sure that you talk to the owner about what things will cost when you arrive to avoid unpleasant surprises later.
 +
 
 +
If travelling by bus, you will be accosted by ''jineteros'' (hustlers) trying to lead you to a casa, where they will get a commission and you will be charged the extra.  For the best rates, arrange your accommodation in advance, either by asking your host to recommend someone or by using a casa particular association.  Some will let you book accommodation over the internet before your trip, and will go out of their way to arrange accommodation for you while you are there.
 +
 
 +
Most small cities and larger towns have at least one state-run hotel, which is often in a restored colonial building.  The prices range from around CUC 25 to CUC 100, depending on what you are getting.  Resorts and high-end Havana hotels can be significantly more expensive.
 +
 
 +
==Learn==
 +
 
 +
The [http://www.uh.cu/ '''University of Havana'''] offers both long and short-term Spanish courses.
 +
 
 +
Cuban '''museums''' are plentiful, frequently open, and usually charge only one or two CUC for admission.  You may get a guided tour from one of the staff members; even if you do not speak Spanish, this can be useful.  They will generally make you check your bags, and charge a small fee for the privilege of taking pictures inside.
 +
 
 +
==Work==
 +
 
 +
The average official salary for Cubans is about US$15 per month. Non-Cubans can only obtain a business/work visa or a work permit through a Cuban business or a foreign business registered in Cuba.  Business visas are generally for up to three months.  Work permits are renewable annually.
 +
 
 +
==Stay safe==
 +
 
 +
Cuba is generally a very safe country; strict and prominent policing, combined with neighborhood watch style-programs keep the streets safe from violent crime.  Nonetheless, a certain degree of common-sense and caution is advisable, especially in major cities. Visitors are advised to avoid coming to the attention of the Cuban police and security services. Drug laws can be draconian and their implementation unpredictable. The same may be said about the laws concerning prostitution. The importation, possession or production of pornography is strictly prohibited. Tourists are therefore advised not to involve themselves in the following three areas: politics, drugs, or pornography/prostitution. It should be noted however that Cuba is not totalitarian by any means, and usually mild comments concerning the regime will not lead to arrest or other penalties.  In fact, many employees and locals will often openly agree with the criticisms, especially away from the major cities.
 +
 
 +
===Scams===
 +
A few small-scale scams exist:
 +
 
 +
*Real-looking discount cigars of dubious authenticity being offered by street touts.
 +
 
 +
*"Friendly" locals inviting tourists to bars for a drink (normally a Mojito) or to a restaurant; the tourist will be charged two to three times the normal price, and the spoils split between the establishment and the "friend".
 +
 
 +
*Short-changing in bars or taxis or giving national pesos (CUP) in change for convertible pesos (CUC).
 +
 
 +
In Havana it is important to always be careful when using money. When taking a taxi, ask someone familiar with the system what the approximate fare should be, as many drivers will try to set an artifically high fare before departing. If in doubt, insist that they use the meter. You can almost be sure that any predetermined fare from the airport is at least 5-10 CUC higher than it should be - insist on the meter.
 +
 
 +
Shop assistants have been known not to give change and go on serving the next customer, assuming the tourist will not be able to speak enough Spanish to question the matter. In addition, some ambiguity exists between whether or not published prices are in CUC or CUP, and many vendors will take CUC when CUP is due and pocket the difference without telling you of your mistake. If in doubt, observe what the other customers are doing before making your purchase.
 +
 
 +
Jineteros are a problem in more hidden areas of larger cities, and will try to sell tourists anything from restaurants to cigars to drugs. Note that this type of soliciation is illegal in Cuba and most will leave you alone if you ignore them or politely say no for fear of police attention. If you do find yourself in a situation with a more relentless jinetero, tell them that you have been in the country for several weeks, that you are a student at the university or that you are from a third-world country (which you could pass as a citizen of) and they will probably leave you alone. Many rely on tourists with who are unfamiliar with the system and comparatively rich, so ideally you should try to make an impression otherwise.
 +
 
 +
===Religious advisory===
 +
Although Seventh-day Adventists and Jehovah's Witnesses groups have had conflicts with the Cuban government, this is unlikely to affect travellers.
 +
 
 +
==Stay healthy==
 +
 
 +
Cuba is considered very healthy except for the water; even many Cubans boil their water. That said, some travellers drink untreated water without ill effect.  The best solution is bottled water and lots of it, especially for visitors who are not used to the 30+°C/85+°F temperatures.  Bottled water (agua embotellada) is easily found and costs between .65 and 2 CUC for a 1.5L bottle, depending on the shop.
 +
 
 +
Cuban milk is usually unpasteurised, and can make visitors sick.  Additionally, tourists should be wary of vegetables washed in tap water.  Despite the warnings, most Cuban food is safe to eat and you do not need to be paranoid.
 +
 
 +
The island is tropical and thus the host to a number of diseases. Some recommend an aggressive program of inoculations when planning a trip to Cuba, but most travellers come with little or none.  Hepatitis B and Tetanus shots are recommended by most travel clinics.
 +
 
 +
HIV/AIDS infection is less than 0.1%, however as always, you should exercise care and make sure you or your partner wears a condom should you become sexually active while in Cuba.
 +
 
 +
Finding medication is often very difficult. It is highly recommended to stock up on off-the-shelf medication before heading to Cuba, as pharmacies lack many medications that westerners might expect to find. Do not attempt to import psychoactive drugs into Cuba.  Havana also features a clinic (and emergency room) for foreigners, which offers extremely prompt service.
 +
 
 +
====Police, Fire and Medical contact numbers====
 +
The emergency number in Cuba is: '''116'''.
 +
 
 +
==Respect==
 +
 
 +
Cubans are generally friendly and helpful people. Keep in mind that they make about US$15 a month; if they can help you, they probably will, but they may expect you to return the favor. If you are invited into a Cuban's home for supper, take the invitation. You may be asked to chip in for the food, but you will really be treated like a guest of honor. It is a great way to get a feel for the culture. Of course, ordinary Cubans are not permitted to host this type of event, but it goes on as a matter of course.
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 +
One way to help local Cubans is by staying in [[casa particular|casas particulares]] and eating in paladares. While free enterprise is usually banned, several years ago the government began selling expensive licenses to individuals wishing to open up rooms for rent in their houses, or set up a few tables on their porch and cook out of their kitchens. Not only are the licenses very expensive but the fees must be paid monthly regardless of income, leaving those less fortunate the possibility of actually ''losing'' money. Not only is it more interesting to stay with locals and eat in their homes, you're actually directly benefiting them in one of the only ways possible.
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Avoid pushing Cubans into a discussion of political issues, as this could have serious repercussions on you and the person you are talking to.  However you'll find many Cubans are comfortable speaking frankly with foreigners about politics.
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==Contact==
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Cuba is, by design, one of the most expensive countries to communicate in.  Incoming phonecalls to Cuba cost about 1 Euro / minute, even through services like Skype.  Outgoing calls from Cuba are similarly expensive.  Having internet at your house is illegal, though pirate connections (usually through a modem set up at a school or workplace) can be obtained for about 30 CUC per month.  In many cities the only way for tourists to access the internet is through the government's communications centers.  Look for large, modern buildings bearing the name "ETECSA", which stands for Empresa de TElecomunicaciones de Cuba S.A.  The computers are new and the connection fast, but it costs 6 CUC / hour.
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===Phone===
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The country code for Cuba is '''53'''.
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GSM cell phones will work in Cuba.
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Revision as of 16:21, 11 December 2007

[[File:Catedral de San Cristobal.jpg|250px|frameless|Cuba]]
Location
[[File:noframe|250px|frameless]]
Flag
[[File:Cu-flag.png|108px|frameless]]
Quick Facts
Capital Havana
Government Communist state
Currency Cuban peso (CUP), Cuban convertible peso (CUC)
Area 110,860 km2
Population 11,382,820 (July 2006 est.)
Language Spanish
Religion Nominally 85% Roman Catholic prior to Castro assuming power; Protestants, Jehovah's Witnesses, Jews, Muslims, and Santería are also represented
Electricity 110V/60Hz or 220V/60Hz (North American, European, or Italian plug)
Country code +53
Internet TLD .cu
Time Zone UTC -5
For other places with the same name, see Cuba (disambiguation).

Cuba [1] is the largest Caribbean island, between the Caribbean Sea and the North Atlantic Ocean. It lies 145 km (90 miles) south of Key West, Florida, between the Cayman Islands and the Bahamas, to the west of Haiti, and northwest of Jamaica.

Contents

Regions

Map of Cuba
  • Western Cuba – Pinar del Rio, Havana and Isla de la Juventud
  • Central Cuba – Matanzas, Villa Clara, Cienfuegos, Sancti Spiritus and Ciego de Avila
  • Eastern Cuba – Camaguey, Las Tunas, Holguin, Santiago de Cuba, Granma and Guantanamo

Cities

  • Havana – cosmopolitan capital with a swinging nightlife
  • Baracoa – Cuba's first capital, a quaint beach-side town
  • Trinidad – World Heritage Site with charming, colonial-era buildings

Other destinations

  • Baracoa – a quaint beach town where in the far east of the country
  • Cayo Largo – a small island with nudist facilities
  • Holguin – province of approximately 1,000,000, situated in central eastern Cuba about one hour's drive from numerous resorts on the north shore. Large airport receiving flights from Canada, the United Kingdom, and Europe.
  • Maria la Gorda – a tiny village with some snorkeling and diving options
  • Varadero – a major beach resort, east of Havana
  • Viñales – rolling hills and mountain scenery

Understand

Statue of Che Guevara above his mausoleum, Santa Clara.

Before the 1959 Revolution, Cuba was a popular tourist destination for United States citizens. Since the Revolution, Cuba has been subjected to a trade and travel embargo by the United States. While travel between the two neighbors is restricted, it is still possible, though illegal for US citizens.

After 1959, Cuban tourism was mostly for Cubans only, and the facilities were not renewed until the 1990s, when Cuba lost financial backing from the defunct Soviet Union and opened its doors to foreign tourism. Now, many Europeans, Canadians, and even U.S. visitors come to the island. In the typical tourist regions like Varadero and Holguin, a lot of modern 3-star to 5-star hotels are available, while in less popular tourist regions, visitors are still able to rent rooms in many Cuban homes (called casas particulares).

Due to several long-standing factors (e.g. bureaucratic ineffectiveness, the U.S. embargo, lack of resources, and the loss of Soviet subsidies), much of the country's infrastructure is in need of repair. In major tourist destinations, there will generally be few problems with either power or water, although such outages may occur. Outages have been common in Cuba, except in tourist facilities that have a generator. 2006 was designated the Year of the Energetic Revolution in Cuba, and many small generators have been installed in an attempt to avoid blackouts. Many tourist accommodations offer 220V as well as 110V power sources.

News

  • Juventud Rebelde, [2].
  • Cuba Vision, [3] is the national television station.
  • Radio Reloj, [4] broadcasts news 24 hours and states the time every minute on the minute — dos cuarenta y dos minutos...
  • Radio Rebelde, [5], another news radio station.

Most of the radio stations are available live online.

Television

If you're staying at a hotel or casa particular, it's likely there will be a television, and watching Cuban television is a good place to observe Cuba's unique mix of vibrant culture, sports and controversial politics.

The Cuban telenovelas are one of the state's key instruments for addressing sexual taboos and educating young people about AIDS, for example. The locally produced cartoons are the most interesting and uniquely Cuban. They range from abstract and artsy to informative to entertaining.

The most famous of the genre is the children's program Elpidio Valdés, which chronicles the adventures of a band of rebels in the 19th century revolt against the Spanish. The mix of cartoon slapstick humor and images of violent revolution (dashing revolutionaries stealing rifles, blowing up Spanish forts, and sticking pistols into the mouths of goofy Spanish generals) in a program geared at children is simultaneously delightful and disturbing.

Get in

For information specific to U.S. citizens see Americans in Cuba

Visa and legal issues

A tourist visa card (visada tarjeta del turista) is necessary for travellers from most nations. This visa, which is really little more than a piece of paper on which you list your vital statistics, costs between 15-25 CUC (or 15-25 Euro), depending on where purchased. It is usually valid for 30 days and can be extended once for another 30 days at any immigration office in Cuba - beyond this you would need a pretty good reason. Canadians are the exception, getting 90 days on arrival and can apply for a 90 day extension. Your passport needs to be valid at least six months past the end of your planned return.

Regular tourists who renew their 30 day visa are eligible to depart the country (to any destination) and return immediately enjoying a further 60 days (30 days plus a 30 day extension). You are only allowed two consecutive stays in this manner.

Citizens of Antigua and Barbuda (28 days), Barbados (28 days), Benin, Bosnia and Herzegovina, CIS (except Ukraine and Uzbekistan), Dominica, Grenada (60 days), Liechtenstein (90 days), Macedonia, Malaysia (90 days), Mongolia, Montenegro (90 days), Namibia, Singapore, Slovakia, Saint Kitts & Nevis, Saint Lucia, Saint Vincent and the Grenadines, Serbia (90 days), Turkmenistan who can stay 30 days without visa.

It is important to note that there is also a departure tax of CUC 25, to be paid in cash when departing Cuba. This tax is not well publicised but it is essential to remember it. You will run into significant difficulties if you do not have enough cash to pay this tax when leaving the country. An ATM is available at the airport but these facilities are not as reliable in Cuba as in other places.

On arrival you must already have a legal housing booking (hotel or casa particular) for at least three days. If you've written in the name of a good hotel on the tourist card, the officials should rarely ask for proof.

Cuban customs can be strict, though they sometimes go easy on tourists.

By plane

Jose Marti International Airport

Jose Martí International Airport outside Havana is the main gateway and is served by major airlines from points in Canada, Mexico, and Europe. There are also regional flights from other Caribbean islands. Cuba's national carrier is Cubana de Aviacion, connecting the island to a handful of destinations in Mexico, South and Central America, Canada and Europe.

An official taxi to Havana center costs 15-25 CUC but you can find cheaper (illegal) ones. The cost is roughly 1 CUC per kilometer.

There are also regular holiday charter flights to resorts such as Varadero, and these can sometimes be less expensive than those going to Havana.

The airports are all fully-air-conditioned and quite modern, compared to other destinations in the Caribbean, offer good medical care in case of problems, and are usually relatively hassle free.

By boat

There are no regular ferries or boats to Cuba from foreign ports, although some cruise liners do visit. Yachters are expected to anchor at the public marinas. Most ports are closed and tourists are not permitted to walk around them. Private vessels may enter at Marina Hemingway in Havana or Marina Acua in Varadero. Entry requires a US passport, but there are no visa requirements. Expect to hand out several $10 bills to facilitate your entry.

Get around

By bus

Víazul is Cuba's hard currency bus line and is by far the best choice of public transportation to tour the island. They run comfortable air-conditioned long-distance coaches with washrooms and televisions to most places of interest to tourists. The buses are getting a bit grubby, but they are reliable and punctual. Complete schedules can be found on the Viazul website (the Varadero - Santa Clara - Cienfuegos - Trinidad and return service is missing from the website but runs daily). The buses can be used theoretically by anyone, including Cubans, but in reality, few Cubans can afford the convertable peso fares. Reservations can be made in advance, but are usually unnecessary except at peak travel times. Do not waste your time making an on-line reservation on the website -- that feature rarely works. Refreshments are not served, despite what the website says, but the buses stop for meal breaks at highway restaurants with bad food. (Bring your own food!) The buses are often over air conditioned, so bring along something warm to wear. Note that most westbound buses from Santiago de Cuba run overnight.

Astro is the bus line that most Cubans use. Most seats are only available for sale to Cubans, who pay in their local currency, but two seats are reserved for anyone, including foreigners, wishing to pay (a much higher fare) in convertable pesos. This fare is slightly cheaper than Viazul. The seats reserved for Cubans are always sold out, sometimes weeks in advance. Astro recently renewed their fleet with 300 new Chinese coaches that are as confortable as Viazul (without the washroom). Although the new buses have proven to be unreliable and often break down, they are still better than the old buses that Astro used to run. Astro has a much more extensive network than Viazul, so it can be useful for tourists. Schedules change often and should always be confirmed in advance. Reservations are essential. If the two convertable peso seats are unsold, they will be given to Cubans on a standby list. For this reason, many travellers try to avoid Astro when possible so that they don't take a seat away from a Cuban, who may have been waiting for days and cannot afford any other means of transportation.

There are also local provincial buses, consisting of overcrowded old beat-up eastern European buses that may or may not be running.

It is also possible to travel between some popular tourist destinations, such as Havana and Varadero, on special tourist minibuses carrying 4-5 people. The cost is a few dollars more but highly recommended if you are not planning to sleep the whole distance - plus you can ask the driver to stop along the way!

By taxi

Official taxis are pretty expensive for long distances. Between Havana and Viñales, for example, will run about CUC 90-100, although this can work out cheaper than traveling by bus or train if you split the fare between several people. If you're up for a little adventure, you can find some enterprising locals willing to (illegally) play "taxi" with their old car for a little less money. Be aware that if they get caught, you will have to get out of the car. Although you will not be in any trouble with the authorities, you may find yourself in the middle of nowhere with no transportation.

Taxis are the most convenient way to get around within the big cities. There are several types of taxis, including the official government taxis, the private and potentially unlicensed "yank tanks", and the small three-wheeled coco-taxis. They're fairly abundant and not hard to find - they tend to group in front of large hotels, but it will usually be cheaper to find one elsewhere.

By car

Yank Tanks

Classic car maintenance on the streets of Havana.

You will find an unusually large number of old U.S.-made cars on the street. Popularly known as "Yank Tanks," these are pre-revolution imports from the 1950s that have been nursed along for half a century, because the Soviet-made cars available during the Cold War were too scarcely allocated for most Cubans to buy (and other cars remain too expensive today).


In Cuba, all vehicles drive on the right hand side of the road.

Car rental starts from CUC 65 per day (including insurance) plus the cost of a full tank of gasoline. The refundable deposits start around CUC 200. Rental cars are for the most part fairly new, imported European or Asian models. Any traffic tickets received are noted on a rental car sheet and are deducted from your rental deposit. Note that if you are involved in a serious traffic accident involving injury or death, you will be detained in Cuba until the legal process sorts things out, which can take months. For this reason, many countries advise their citizens not to rent cars in Cuba.

Generally traffic is light, especially away from Havana. Outside of towns and cities traffic is usually very light, with no cars for miles. Be warned - you also share the highways with cyclists (sometimes going the wrong way, and at night usually without lights) and horse-drawn vehicles. Also note that the Autopista (the main highway running down the center of the country) is crossed at occasional intervals by railway tracks - take care to slow down before going over to avoid damage to the tires or suspension. Many of these have a stop sign ("PARE" in Spanish) which you should carefully heed - or risk a fine of CUC 30, even if no train is coming.

Expect to encounter checkpoints when traveling in the interior of the country.

Gasoline costs CUC 0.85/Regular, CUC 0.95/Special and 1.10/Super per litre. Tourist rental cars are not supposed to use regular.

Hitchhiking and the "Amarillo"

The Cuban government's system for facilitating hitchhiking is by far the most economical way for foreigners to travel in Cuba, though a flexible schedule and good Spanish are a must. Known as "El Amarillo" ("the yellow guy") for the yellowy-beige uniforms of its administrators, the system consists of points along main routes where certain vehicles are required to stop and pick up hitchhikers. Amarillo points ("el punto amarillo") along major highways are often full service rest stops for hitchhikers, with water, peso-priced food, and a 24 hour indoor waiting area.

To use the system within cities, just keep your eyes peeled for a man or woman in a yellow / beige uniform standing along the road near a line of people. Tell the official where you need to go, and wait. To travel long distances, you need to get to the "punto amarillo" on the edge of the city in the direction you're going. Ask a local for help on the best way to do that. Then as you pass through cities, ask what bus or taxi to take to get to the "punto amarillo" on the outgoing road at the opposite extreme of the city. This can be tricky, and it's often worth it to take a local taxi. If you can find a Cuban to accompany you on your journey, their help will be invaluable.

In daytime hours, when the amarillo is present, you pay a nominal amount of money (approx. 20 pesos from one city to the next) to the official when you find a ride. The money all goes to the government; drivers don't get any. As a result, it's much easier to travel long distances at night, when the amarillo has gone home and drivers can make some money picking up hitchhikers.

Of course, it's always possible to hitchhike just by sticking out your thumb to passing cars, but be prepared to give the driver 20-50 pesos for a long ride.

Most of the rides you get will be in the back of large trucks, open to the weather. This is an exciting and beautiful way to travel the Cuban countryside. Though an accident would obviously be very dangerous for passengers, school kids, older adults, and parents with small children using this system every day. Make sure to bring protection against sun and rain and, if traveling at night, wind and cold.

Hitchhiking is the only system where you can travel for Cuban prices without paying a tourist premium. Given that transportation is one of a tourist's biggest expenses in Cuba, this can make your money go much farther. Tell folks you're a student (not a tourist) to avoid funny looks and price gouging.

By train

The main train line in the country runs between Havana and Santiago de Cuba, with major stops at Santa Clara and Camagüey. Trains also run to other cities such as Cienfuegos, Manzanillo, Morón, Sancti Spiritus, and Pinar del Rio.

There is one reliable train in Cuba: the overnight Tren Francès between Havana and Santiago de Cuba, which runs on alternate days. It uses equipment that was formerly operated on the Trans-Europe Express, and donated to Cuba by France a few years ago (hence the name). There are first class and special first class seats on this train (the special seats are better and more expensive), but no sleepers. If only one train in Cuba is running, this will be it.

All other trains in Cuba are unreliable. The equipment is often in poor condition, breakdowns are common, and when they occur, you can be stuck for the better part of the day (or night) waiting for a replacement engine. There are no services on the trains, so bring plenty of food and water with you. Trains are frequently cancelled. Some trains offer first class seats (don't expect too much); others have second class seats, which can be very uncomfortable. Schedules are at best optimistic and should always be checked in advance of travel. There are no sleepers on overnight routes.

If you are still thinking of taking a train, other than the Tren Francès, you should know that many Cubans prefer to hitchhike than take the train.

If you are still determined to take a train, approximate schedules are given under the different city descriptions. Foreginers must pay much higher fares (in convertable pesos) than the locals do. Tickets are roughly two-thirds what Viazul charges. Theft is a problem so watch your luggage!

By plane

The fastest and most comfortable way to cover larger distances is on either of the Cuban airlines, Cubana de Aviación or Aero Caribbean.


By bike

Calm roads and beautiful scenery make Cuba an ideal country for biking. You will have to bring your own bike as bikes suitable for trekking are not readily available in Cuba. Roads in most places in Cuba are reasonable, but it may still be a good idea to bring a mountain bike. Mountain bikes are stronger and allow for better driving off-road. Make sure to bring all spare parts you might need along the way, since they will not be available in Cuba. As casas pariculares are available even in relatively small towns it is easy to plan an itinerary. Food for on the road can often be obtained locally for cheap Cuban Pesos, but make sure if you travel through more remote areas to carry enough food (and water!). Bikers are often met with enthusiasm and interest; when taking a break you will often be approached by curious locals. It is possible to take bikes on a tourbus, like "Viazul", to cover larger distances. You have to arrange a personal agreement with the driver however, who will expect a little bonus in return. It is also possible to take bikes on trains and even to hitch with bikes (wave some convertible pesos to approaching drivers to catch their attention).


By boat

There are two main island groups to explore along the southern shore of Cuba. Your sailing area from the two main bases, Cienfuegos or Trinidad incorporates the Canarreos Archipelago and the Juventud Islands or Jardines de la Reina Archipelago. Windward Islands.

Talk

The official language of Cuba is Spanish, although the version here is quite different from that spoken in Spain or Mexico. Cubans tend to swallow the last syllable in a word and generally swallow the 's' sound. Many would argue that it's quite a beautiful dialect.

Buy

Money

For information specific to U.S. citizens see Americans in Cuba

There are two currencies circulating in Cuba, Cuban Pesos (CUP) and Cuban Convertible Pesos (CUC). Prior to November 2004 US dollars were in wide circulation on par with the CUC, but the government discontinued that and they are no longer used.

CUC is the currency most tourists will use in Cuba. It is how you will pay for hotels, official taxis, entry into museums, meals at restaurants, cigars, rum, etc. Conversion into CUC can be done at exchange houses (casa de cambio, or cadeca). These are located in many hotels and in other places throughout the cities. CUC are valued at 28 times the value of CUP. Tourists are permitted to import or export a maxiumum of CUP 100 or CUC 200 at any one time.

CUP are also known as local Pesos and Moneda Nacional (National money). As of Nov 2007, 1 CUC = 28.62 CUP. There is a limited range of goods that can be bought for local pesos, and these are transactions carried out in agricultural markets or from street vendors. Fruits, vegetables, fresh juices and snacks from street vendors are among the things CUP can buy. Because the products that can be purchased with CUP are limited, it is not a good idea to change more than CUC 5-10 into CUP at a time, as the CUP will last for a good while.

Exchanging currency

Exchanging currency in Cuba can be complicated.

Keep in mind that most of your transactions will take place using CUC. Banco Central de Cuba publishes official exchange rates on its website, or alternatively try XE.com

European and Canadian currency can be exchanged for CUC. The best rates are at the banks or Cadeca counters, not at the resorts. There seems to be little difference between the rates offered at the airports and in the cities. Some other currencies may not be exchangable for CUC. As of January 2007, US dollars are not being accepted for exchange in official outlets. Since many US citizens take flights through Canada to get to Cuba, Canadian currency may be the easiest option for American travellers.

When changing into CUP, be aware that some places, like hotels, will not change foreign currencies directly into CUP; instead, they will change your currency into CUC and then change your CUC into CUP. You will lose money on each of the exchanges. Any Cadeca should happily change your foreign currency directly into CUP, if you wish. Be realistic about how much you will need -- it will not be much.

Traveler's Checks

Traveler's checks drawn on American banks are not technically valid in Cuba, though many have had success cashing U.S. traveler's checks at major tourist hotels. American Express checks are difficult to cash due to the likelihood that they were purchased with U.S. dollars. For example, Swiss traveler's checks will be accepted, as long as they are in Swiss francs, even if the checks are made "in licence" of an American bank, as long as the real producer of them is non-American. Visa Traveller's cheques are accepted, though the same caveats about being drawn on an American bank apply. It's better to bring cash to Cuba; resorts accept Euros, Canadian dollars, British pounds, Swiss francs and Hong Kong yuan currencies without any fees. If backpacking or leaving the resort areas, exchange your currency to CUCs, as foreign currency is not accepted by many locals. For U.S. dollars, they will charge a penalty of 10%, so it's better to change to Euros, Canadian dollars or Swiss francs before travelling there.

ATMs and Credit cards

ATMs are rare in Cuba, with only a handful found in Havana. Most are linked with either the Mastercard/Cirrus or Visa/Plus interbank systems. U.S.-issued cards will not be accepted. Unlike some national systems, only primary accounts (typically checking) are recognized. Even if you find an ATM and meet the above criteria it still may not have sufficient cash for a large withdrawal - if refused, try again and ask for a smaller amount.

Visa & Mastercard credit cards (of non-US origin) can usually be used, including for cash advances, but places that accept Visa as payment are extremely limited. Credit cards are charged in US dollars plus 11.24% (the 8% exchange difference plus a 3% fee). The best places to attempt to use a credit/Debit card for a cash withdrawl are at the state run Cadecas / Cambios - rather than banks used by Cubans, using the 'red' (company name) ATMs. Debit cards are generally not accepted, although this does vary from card to card.

Many banks will tell you that your debit card will be accepted in Cuba when in fact it will not. Do not rely on ATMs for cash as you may be used to in other countries. Have enough currency or travellers cheques when you enter the country to get by, if necessary.

Banks

Banks often close at 3pm, and earlier on the last day of the month. Cadecas (exchange bureaus) may be open longer, especially in hotels. When going to a bank allow enough time as service is usually slow and many people may already be waiting. Foreigners may get preferred treatment in exchange for a small tip.

You must bring your passport in case you want to exchange traveler's checks or make a credit card advance, although cash can be changed without a passport. Exchange rates do vary from place to place, and some hotels do give significantly worse exchange rates than the banks.

Merchandise

As in any third world country, most of the merchandise available is designed for tourists to take back home. The biggest Cuban exports for tourists are rum, cigars, and coffee, all of which are available at government-owned stores (including the duty free store at the airport) or on the streets. For genuine merchandise, you should pay the official price at the legal stores.

Another thing Cubans do well is music such as salsa, son, and Afro-Cubano. You can purchase CDs or tapes anywhere, but paying the average cost of US$20 to assures you of quality and supports the artists.

If you are planning to take big quantities (several boxes or more) of cigars with you, be sure you have purchased them officially from an approved shop that gives you proper purchase documentation. Foreign nationals are allowed to export up to 24 cigars (generally 25 to a box) without special permits or receipts, but the export of 25 or more requires official receipts. If you buy cigars cheap on streets and you don't have official purchase invoice then your cigars may/will be confiscated. Also, be advised that any purchase of Cuban cigars outside government-approved stores (even in resorts) has the potential to be fake, and that the "cigar factory worker who steals from the factory" does not exist in any appreciable quantities. If you find a "deal" from a street vendor, it's incredibly likely you are getting fakes, some of which may not even be made of tobacco. Always ensure, no matter where you buy, that the Cuban government origin warranty stamp is properly affixed to the cigar box. Americans are no longer allowed to bring Cuban cigars back into the U.S., regardless of their value, if they have an OFAC license, or even if they were given as a gift. It is also illegal for Americans to smoke or buy Cuban cigars anywhere in the world.

Officially you'll need permission to export paintings that are larger than 70cm/side. When you buy artwork from approved shop then they'll give you also the required document, that consists of one paper and one stamp that will be glued on back of your painting. Serial numbers on the stamp and paper must match. Cost of the document is about CUC 2-3. In reality, it is possible that no one will be interested in your paintings.

Medical Tourism

Cuba has long been a popular Medical Tourism destination for patients worldwide that seek high quality medical care at low costs. According to the Association of Caribbean States, nearly 20,000 international patients visited Cuba in 2006 for medical care. Cuba is especially attractive to many Latin American and North American patients given its easy proximity and relaxing environment.

A wide range of medical treatments are provided including joint replacement, cancer treatment, eye surgery, cosmetic surgery and addictions rehabilitation. Costs are about 60 to 80 percent less than U.S. costs. For example, Choice Medical Services a health tourism provider, provides a hip replacement at leading Cuban hospitals for US$5845

Eat

Being that all restaurants are owned by the government and run by underpaid employees, the food in Cuba is notoriously bland. If you are expecting the fiery pepperpot spiciness found on some of the other Caribbean islands, consider that the national dish in Cuba is rice and beans (moros y christianos). A popular saying goes that the best Cuban food can be found in the U.S. Within Cuba, the best food will generally be found in your casa particular or in paladares (locally owned restaurants in private homes).

Black beans are a main staple in Cuban households. Cubans eat mainly pork and chicken for meat. Beef and lobster are controlled by the state, and therefore illegal to sell outside of state owned hotels and restaurants, however special lobster lunch/supper offers are plentiful for tourists. You may see turtle on menus in Paladares, but be aware that they are endangered and eating them is illegal.

Paladares are plentiful, even in the smaller towns. Seating is often limited, so you may need to arrive when they open, usually around 5 or 6pm. If you are staying in a casa particular ask your host for recommendations, as the quality of the food can vary substantially between paladares. Only eat in ones that have a printed menu with prices, otherwise you are very likely to pay two to three times as much as you should. That said, several have taken to printing two different menus, one with local prices and one with foreigner prices. Eating in paladares is perfectly legal, but be aware that if you are taken there by a Cuban, you may be charged extra in order to cover commission of the person who brought you. A supper will cost around 7 or 8 CUC per person.

It is difficult to find any restaurants serving breakfast in Cuba outside of resorts; most casas particulares will serve their guests a large breakfast for around 4 CUC per person if requested.

A tasty serving of rice, vegetables, plantains, and pork or beef (called a cajita ["little box" in English]) is an attractive and affordable option, and are generally sold for around US$1 out of people's homes.

You can also find small street vendors selling a variety of foods, typically sandwiches and pizzas for between 2 and 12 CUP. The quality varies from vendor to vendor so when you find a good one take note. Many of these stores are run from people's living rooms, and buying from them is a good way to help provide some extra income to a Cuban family. While these meals are satisfying and cheap, be warned that long lines are common and the vendors are rarely in any rush to see everyone fed quickly.

Drink

Cuban national cocktails include the Cuba Libre (rum and cola) and the Mojito (rum, lime, sugar, mint leaves, club soda and ice).

If you request a rum in a small country restaurant do not be surprised if it is only available by the bottle. Havana Club is the national brand and the most popular. Expect to pay $4 for three year old white rum or $8 for seven year old dark rum.

Cristal is a light beer and is available in "dollar" stores where Cubans with CUCs and visitors may shop. Cubans prefer the Bucanero Fuerte, which at 5.5% alcohol is a strong (hence the "fuerte") darker beer. Both Cristal and Bucanero are brewed by a joint venture with Labatts of Canada, whose beer is the only Cuban beer sold in CUC. A stronger version, Bucanero Max is also available - primarily available in Havana. There are also smaller brews, not available everywhere, such as Hatuey and Corona del Mar. These are sold in CUP.

Sleep

If you want to experience something of the real life of Cubans, the best places to stay are casas particulares (private houses licensed to offer lodging services to foreigners). They are cheaper than hotels (average CUC 20/room) and the food (breakfast CUC 3-4, dinner CUC 7-10) is almost always better than you would get in a hotel. Casas particulares are plentiful even in small towns; they are somewhat more expensive in Havana than elsewhere. Note that any service offered by a casa particular other than accommodation, such as driving you to the bus station, will be added to your bill, regardless of whether this is stated up front. Items such as bottled water supplied with your meal will also have a charge. Always make sure that you talk to the owner about what things will cost when you arrive to avoid unpleasant surprises later.

If travelling by bus, you will be accosted by jineteros (hustlers) trying to lead you to a casa, where they will get a commission and you will be charged the extra. For the best rates, arrange your accommodation in advance, either by asking your host to recommend someone or by using a casa particular association. Some will let you book accommodation over the internet before your trip, and will go out of their way to arrange accommodation for you while you are there.

Most small cities and larger towns have at least one state-run hotel, which is often in a restored colonial building. The prices range from around CUC 25 to CUC 100, depending on what you are getting. Resorts and high-end Havana hotels can be significantly more expensive.

Learn

The University of Havana offers both long and short-term Spanish courses.

Cuban museums are plentiful, frequently open, and usually charge only one or two CUC for admission. You may get a guided tour from one of the staff members; even if you do not speak Spanish, this can be useful. They will generally make you check your bags, and charge a small fee for the privilege of taking pictures inside.

Work

The average official salary for Cubans is about US$15 per month. Non-Cubans can only obtain a business/work visa or a work permit through a Cuban business or a foreign business registered in Cuba. Business visas are generally for up to three months. Work permits are renewable annually.

Stay safe

Cuba is generally a very safe country; strict and prominent policing, combined with neighborhood watch style-programs keep the streets safe from violent crime. Nonetheless, a certain degree of common-sense and caution is advisable, especially in major cities. Visitors are advised to avoid coming to the attention of the Cuban police and security services. Drug laws can be draconian and their implementation unpredictable. The same may be said about the laws concerning prostitution. The importation, possession or production of pornography is strictly prohibited. Tourists are therefore advised not to involve themselves in the following three areas: politics, drugs, or pornography/prostitution. It should be noted however that Cuba is not totalitarian by any means, and usually mild comments concerning the regime will not lead to arrest or other penalties. In fact, many employees and locals will often openly agree with the criticisms, especially away from the major cities.

Scams

A few small-scale scams exist:

  • Real-looking discount cigars of dubious authenticity being offered by street touts.
  • "Friendly" locals inviting tourists to bars for a drink (normally a Mojito) or to a restaurant; the tourist will be charged two to three times the normal price, and the spoils split between the establishment and the "friend".
  • Short-changing in bars or taxis or giving national pesos (CUP) in change for convertible pesos (CUC).

In Havana it is important to always be careful when using money. When taking a taxi, ask someone familiar with the system what the approximate fare should be, as many drivers will try to set an artifically high fare before departing. If in doubt, insist that they use the meter. You can almost be sure that any predetermined fare from the airport is at least 5-10 CUC higher than it should be - insist on the meter.

Shop assistants have been known not to give change and go on serving the next customer, assuming the tourist will not be able to speak enough Spanish to question the matter. In addition, some ambiguity exists between whether or not published prices are in CUC or CUP, and many vendors will take CUC when CUP is due and pocket the difference without telling you of your mistake. If in doubt, observe what the other customers are doing before making your purchase.

Jineteros are a problem in more hidden areas of larger cities, and will try to sell tourists anything from restaurants to cigars to drugs. Note that this type of soliciation is illegal in Cuba and most will leave you alone if you ignore them or politely say no for fear of police attention. If you do find yourself in a situation with a more relentless jinetero, tell them that you have been in the country for several weeks, that you are a student at the university or that you are from a third-world country (which you could pass as a citizen of) and they will probably leave you alone. Many rely on tourists with who are unfamiliar with the system and comparatively rich, so ideally you should try to make an impression otherwise.

Religious advisory

Although Seventh-day Adventists and Jehovah's Witnesses groups have had conflicts with the Cuban government, this is unlikely to affect travellers.

Stay healthy

Cuba is considered very healthy except for the water; even many Cubans boil their water. That said, some travellers drink untreated water without ill effect. The best solution is bottled water and lots of it, especially for visitors who are not used to the 30+°C/85+°F temperatures. Bottled water (agua embotellada) is easily found and costs between .65 and 2 CUC for a 1.5L bottle, depending on the shop.

Cuban milk is usually unpasteurised, and can make visitors sick. Additionally, tourists should be wary of vegetables washed in tap water. Despite the warnings, most Cuban food is safe to eat and you do not need to be paranoid.

The island is tropical and thus the host to a number of diseases. Some recommend an aggressive program of inoculations when planning a trip to Cuba, but most travellers come with little or none. Hepatitis B and Tetanus shots are recommended by most travel clinics.

HIV/AIDS infection is less than 0.1%, however as always, you should exercise care and make sure you or your partner wears a condom should you become sexually active while in Cuba.

Finding medication is often very difficult. It is highly recommended to stock up on off-the-shelf medication before heading to Cuba, as pharmacies lack many medications that westerners might expect to find. Do not attempt to import psychoactive drugs into Cuba. Havana also features a clinic (and emergency room) for foreigners, which offers extremely prompt service.

Police, Fire and Medical contact numbers

The emergency number in Cuba is: 116.

Respect

Cubans are generally friendly and helpful people. Keep in mind that they make about US$15 a month; if they can help you, they probably will, but they may expect you to return the favor. If you are invited into a Cuban's home for supper, take the invitation. You may be asked to chip in for the food, but you will really be treated like a guest of honor. It is a great way to get a feel for the culture. Of course, ordinary Cubans are not permitted to host this type of event, but it goes on as a matter of course.

One way to help local Cubans is by staying in casas particulares and eating in paladares. While free enterprise is usually banned, several years ago the government began selling expensive licenses to individuals wishing to open up rooms for rent in their houses, or set up a few tables on their porch and cook out of their kitchens. Not only are the licenses very expensive but the fees must be paid monthly regardless of income, leaving those less fortunate the possibility of actually losing money. Not only is it more interesting to stay with locals and eat in their homes, you're actually directly benefiting them in one of the only ways possible.

Avoid pushing Cubans into a discussion of political issues, as this could have serious repercussions on you and the person you are talking to. However you'll find many Cubans are comfortable speaking frankly with foreigners about politics.

Contact

Cuba is, by design, one of the most expensive countries to communicate in. Incoming phonecalls to Cuba cost about 1 Euro / minute, even through services like Skype. Outgoing calls from Cuba are similarly expensive. Having internet at your house is illegal, though pirate connections (usually through a modem set up at a school or workplace) can be obtained for about 30 CUC per month. In many cities the only way for tourists to access the internet is through the government's communications centers. Look for large, modern buildings bearing the name "ETECSA", which stands for Empresa de TElecomunicaciones de Cuba S.A. The computers are new and the connection fast, but it costs 6 CUC / hour.

Phone

The country code for Cuba is 53.

GSM cell phones will work in Cuba.




This country guide is usable. It has links to this country's major cities and other destinations (and all are at usable status or better), a valid regional structure and information about this country's currency, language, cuisine, and culture is included. At least the most prominent attraction is identified with directions. An adventurous person could use this article, but please plunge forward and help it grow!



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