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Difference between revisions of "Corrales"

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(Do: Corrales Bosque Trail)
 
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'''Corrales''' is a village on the west bank of the Rio Grande, in [[central New Mexico]]. Despite being in the [[Albuquerque]] metro area, between [[Rio Rancho]] and [[Bernalillo]], it has held on to its rural roots. The main (and only) road through Corrales is two lanes and 25 mph and almost all the shops along it are locally owned. There are almost always local events from farmer's markets to heritage celebrations.   
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'''Corrales''' is a village on the west bank of the Rio Grande, in [[central New Mexico]]. Despite being in the [[Albuquerque]] metro area, sandwiched between Albuquerque and the large suburb of Rio Rancho, Corrales has held on to its rural roots. The main (and only) road through Corrales is two lanes and 30 mph and lined with picturesque adobe buildings, many of them containing locally owned shops. There are often local events to take in, including farmer's markets, art tours, and heritage celebrations.
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==Get in==
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Driving is the best option for getting into townNM 448 (Corrales Road) runs north-south through the village, connecting to Alameda Blvd and Coors Blvd near the Cottonwood Mall in northwestern Albuquerque.  At the northern end of Corrales, NM 448 connects with NM 528 in Rio Rancho.
  
 
==See==
 
==See==
Corrales Bosque Preserve
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*'''Casa San Ysidro''', 973 Old Church Road, +1 505 898-3915, [http://www.cabq.gov/museum/history/casatour.html]. A historic house and rancho operated by the Albuquerque Museum, offering one a glimpse into Spanish colonial life in the valley. Tours are available Wednesdays through Sundays from February to November, see website for times. $4 adults, $3 seniors/students, $2 children.
  
 
==Do==
 
==Do==
Corrales is known as an equestrian community and has a special interest in trails, of which it has an abundance.
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*'''Corrales Bosque Preserve'''. Along the Rio Grande is a stretch of ''bosque'', or cottonwood forest, which offers a scenic space to walk and take in views of the river and the Sandia Mountains.  Corrales has an abundance of trails, many utilized by an active equestrian community in the area. Good information on the bosque trails can be found at [http://www.bosquebill.com/bosquetrails.html].
 
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*Corrales Bosque Trail[http://www.bosquebill.com/bosquetrails.html]
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==Buy==
 
==Buy==
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==Sleep==
 
==Sleep==
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There are several local bed and breakfasts in town, each with a unique character and housed in lovely adobe buildings. However, if you're looking for something more affordable, there are several chain motels along NM 528 nearby in Rio Rancho, just west of Corrales.
  
 
==Contact==
 
==Contact==
Local organizations involved in trail advocacy, building, and maintenance include:
 
*Corrales Equine Advisory Commission (CEAC)
 
*Corrales Bicycle/Pedestrian Advisory Commission (BPAC)
 
 
==Get in==
 
  
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{{isPartOf|Central New Mexico}}
 
{{outline}}
 
{{outline}}
{{districtguide}}
 

Latest revision as of 20:51, 22 September 2010

Corrales is a village on the west bank of the Rio Grande, in central New Mexico. Despite being in the Albuquerque metro area, sandwiched between Albuquerque and the large suburb of Rio Rancho, Corrales has held on to its rural roots. The main (and only) road through Corrales is two lanes and 30 mph and lined with picturesque adobe buildings, many of them containing locally owned shops. There are often local events to take in, including farmer's markets, art tours, and heritage celebrations.

Contents

Get in[edit]

Driving is the best option for getting into town. NM 448 (Corrales Road) runs north-south through the village, connecting to Alameda Blvd and Coors Blvd near the Cottonwood Mall in northwestern Albuquerque. At the northern end of Corrales, NM 448 connects with NM 528 in Rio Rancho.

See[edit][add listing]

  • Casa San Ysidro, 973 Old Church Road, +1 505 898-3915, [1]. A historic house and rancho operated by the Albuquerque Museum, offering one a glimpse into Spanish colonial life in the valley. Tours are available Wednesdays through Sundays from February to November, see website for times. $4 adults, $3 seniors/students, $2 children.

Do[edit][add listing]

  • Corrales Bosque Preserve. Along the Rio Grande is a stretch of bosque, or cottonwood forest, which offers a scenic space to walk and take in views of the river and the Sandia Mountains. Corrales has an abundance of trails, many utilized by an active equestrian community in the area. Good information on the bosque trails can be found at [2].

Buy[edit][add listing]

Eat[edit][add listing]

Drink[edit][add listing]

Sleep[edit][add listing]

There are several local bed and breakfasts in town, each with a unique character and housed in lovely adobe buildings. However, if you're looking for something more affordable, there are several chain motels along NM 528 nearby in Rio Rancho, just west of Corrales.

Contact[edit]


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