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Difference between revisions of "Coolgardie"

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Coolgardie is located in the center of the Great Western Woodlands. In its earlier days people were of more suspicious nature believing in myths that originated from the frequent visited pubs. Before the construction of the Goldfields and Agricultural Water Supply scheme water was rare and had to be transported from the Darling Range which was then sold by Asian immigrants. The most recent story of these myths is the one of Shluckaroo and is described as fllows. In the early days, long before Ned Kelly and Unknown Gravy John roamed the pastoral districts, the pioneer explorers of Western Autstralia's outback found gold in the area bordered by Beacon, Menzies and Salmon Gums. With the introduction of Kalgoorlie Bitter and the first visit of a freak circus offering nail polishing Siamese twins, Mongolian warriors wrestling in camel milk and midget cannonball a mystic woodland creature surfaced. Thanks to the gold dust on his fur, his jolly good humor and the mighty thirst the community's heart quickly fell in love for this abortion worthy critter. This was the birth of Shluckaroo! However with the arrival of more prospectors and an influx of skimpies the popularity of Shluckaroo slowly commenced vanishing. At the 19th century mining peak days Shluckaroo sadly acknowledged that his lucky strike was over. With the first price rise at his watering hole, Shluckaroo escaped over the American Western stile entry doors, hopped over to the nearest bottle-o, filled his pouch with King Browns and disappeared in to the vast surrounding nature. Shuckaroo was never seen thereafter. In April 2013 a dream time wave passed through a few awareness open minds and a responding expedition team filled the biggest in Bunnings purchasable esky and saddled their Toyota Hilux to venture to this remote wilderness which also represents the world's largest Mediterranean forest. The aim was to beat the tree hole rimming environmental conservatist to ensure a return of mighty Shluckaroo to his once beloved and appreciated environment is possible. However the proposed failed due to the hearty entertainment at the Exchange Hotel and the Gold Bar. Thus Shluckaroo is still egoistically hopping and circum vidi navigating in the sticks of the Great Western Woodlands. May the dust make him rich again. Although the poor thing must have an empty pouch by now. And now imagine a typical Spagghetti Western song played by a narcocorrido ballad band singing: A man's face on a kangaroo, plenty of drink that shall do; hunting unexplored grounds and sniffing the Skimpies poo, he is Shluckaroo-hoo, Schluckaroooooo...Time to grab your handkerchief and wipe off your compationet tears. End of Story.
 
  
 
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==Eat==

Latest revision as of 11:18, 5 May 2013

Coolgardie [1] is a town in the Goldfields-Esperance region of Western Australia.

Understand[edit]

The first major goldrush town is far more subdued these days.

  • Coolgardie Tourist Bureau, 62 Bayley St, +61 8 9026 6090. daily 9AM-5PM. A small office in the old town hall will tell you where things are or if any roads are closed.  edit

Get in[edit]

By car[edit]

  • From Perth it's 557km east on the Great Eastern Hwy, 32km short of Kalgoorlie. It passes right through the middle of town.
  • From Esperance it's 368km north on the Coolgardie-Esperance Hwy.

Get around[edit]

Most of sights are along either side of a 500m stretch of Beyley St, though the street is so wide you wont want to cross it too many times.

See[edit][add listing]

Along the road side and on significant buildings are information board explaining the history of what stands (or once stood) here.

  • Ben Prior's Park, Beyley St. A rusty collection of old mining and agricultural machinery. free.  edit
  • Coolgardie Cemetery, Beyley St (1km west of town). Some of the oldest headstones in the region tell a story of the fortunes and misfortunes of the early pionering prospectors. The prominent grave of legendary explorer Ernest Giles is a few rows down on to the left of entry gate. He saw out his last days in Coolgardie working in a government office. free.  edit
  • Jack Carin's Camp, Great Eastern Hwy (3km east of town). The ramshackle home of legendary prospector known for riding his bike into town. He was knocked from his bike and took his own life shortly after getting out of hospital. Try to ignore the huge mine only meters away.  edit
  • Old Post Office. At the time of its construction the local press criticized it as the most unremarkable building in town. Age has not lent it any more grace, but it's worth a look.  edit


Further afield[edit]

  • Burra Rock, Burra Rock Rd (Take Neepan Rd from Coolgardie then). Site of an ingenious dam built to supply water to the trains of the old woodline. The dam it still full and the wall of grannite slabs that fringe the rock is a remarkable site. Picnic and campsites here only have toilets as far as facilities go.  edit
  • Victoria Rock, Victoria Rd (On the Holland track, 45km from Coolgardie). The largest hill in the area that gives a good view from the fairly tame peak. Camping spots are quiet and sheltered.  edit

Do[edit][add listing]

Eat[edit][add listing]

Drink[edit][add listing]

Sleep[edit][add listing]

There are a couple hotels and a caravan park on the main street.


Contact[edit]

Phone[edit]

A satellite phone would be useful to have in an emergency if you intend to spend an extended amount of time off the beaten track.

Get out[edit]

  • Kalgoorlie-Boulder - A booming gold mining town with enough history and vibrant eateries to fill the giant hole in the ground where its fortune comes from.




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