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Campania

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Campania is a region in South-Western Italy.

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Two busses passing

Public Transport: within Campania the public transport has a unified ticket system called Campania Unico. Tickets are organised in zones which means that with one ticket you can travel within one zone (usually defined by how long it takes , someone could try to explain better!), two or more. Included in this system are generally national trains (also to Paestum, the underground in Naples, the Funicolore in Naples, Cita buses along the Amalfi Coast, the Funicolore on Capri, Bus of Ischia the Circumvesuviana that goes also past Pompeii and Herculaneum but NOT ferries. The advantage is not only, that you can get tickets for different kind of vehicles, but you could also buy tickets in advance for areas where it is difficult to find a ticket office such as Paestum, as the tickets start to be valid once you stamped them. It is possibly also cheaper to buy a bunch of 'one zone' tickets than each time a new one. But careful: some tickets are locally bound (only in Naples, for example). If in doubt, ask when you buy your tickets.

[Campania Unico official website]

  • By Train: National train lines go from Naples to Salerno and further east and southwards. The Circumvesuviana is a local private train link serving the area around the Mount Vesuvius from Naples to Sorrento. The service has the appeal of typical metropolitan trains connecting to local suburbs (including the odd graffiti and cut open seat/window). For tourists this train service is particularly interesting because it is the only reasonable public transport link to Pompeii, Herculaneum and the Vesuvius. Note: there are several different lines but ONLY THE BLUE LINE goes to Pompeii, Herculaneum and the Vesuvius. Check the [Circumvesuvia official website] for details. (Italian, the English link on the website is broken. Click on 'Orario Ferrovia' to get comprehensive timetables as PDF)
  • By Boat:
  • By Bus:
  • By Car: The Amalfi-Sorrento-Salerno road is narrow and full of hairpin turns. Cars passes fast and close. Take care.

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Eat

Perhaps the Campania product most widely known is Mozzarella di Bufala, with DOP awarded by the European Union. Due to vast market demand and the scarce number of water buffalo, it is also however a product at risk of a ”bufala“ (also Italian for scam). To avoid this, each wrapper carries the symbol of the protection consortium to guarantee its authenticity and geographic origin. The origin of the mozzarella – so called from the verb ”mozzare“ to cut – probably goes back to the 12th century, while the buffalo was already part of the Campanian landscape in the 7th century. The true characteristic of this fresh cheese with a delicate taste is its consistency, which should be firm, slightly elastic and chewy. When cut, the centre of a true mozzarella di bufala 'weeps': an interior still be slightly serous, protected by a thin skin and it should be smooth, but not viscous. It should be preserved in its liquid for no more than 48 hours, preferably not in the refrigerator but in a cool and airy place. As well as the characteristic round form it is produced in braids, knots, nuts and cherries and there is also a smoked version.

It is not possible to talk about Campania’s gastronomy without mentioning the pizza. This palate’s delight was born in Naples, in honour of Queen Margaret. From simple baked product it became a fanciful, rich, surprising and always appreciated food.

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Limoncello

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Campania is a good base for exploring other regions of southern Italy such as Basilicata, Calabria and Apulia, as well as Sicily.

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