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== Poblacions ==
 
== Poblacions ==
L''''este''' és una regió de [[Tailàndia]].
 
 
== Províncias ==
 
* [[Chachoengsao_(província)|Chachoengsao]]
 
* [[Chanthaburi_(província)|Chanthaburi]]
 
* [[Chonburi_(província)|Chonburi]]
 
* [[Prachinburi_(província)|Prachinburi]]
 
* [[Rayong_(província)|Rayong]]
 
* [[Sa Kaew_(província)|Sa Kaew]]
 
* [[Trat_(província)|Trat]]
 
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More
 
  Last Updated: Friday, 23 November 2007, 22:50 GMT 
 
 
E-mail this to a friend  Printable version 
 
 
Lebanese presidency ends in chaos 
 
 
Mr Lahoud left office refusing to recognise the PM's government
 
The term of Lebanon's president has ended with no elected successor and a bitter dispute over who is in power.
 
Before pro-Syrian President Emile Lahoud left the presidential palace at midnight (2200 GMT) he issued an order that the army should take over control.
 
 
But pro-Western PM Fouad Siniora rejected the move and says that under the constitution he and his cabinet are in temporary power.
 
 
The latest in a series of attempts to find a new president failed on Friday.
 
 
The president is elected by parliament, but a vote was scuppered after the pro-Syrian opposition did not allow the necessary quorum to be achieved. A new vote has been scheduled for 30 November.
 
 
KEY STEPS
 
Vote scheduled 1300 (1100 GMT) Friday but not held. Speaker sets vote for 30 November
 
President Emile Lahoud's term expires 0000 Saturday
 
If the presidency become vacant, constitution says presidential powers passed to PM Fouad Siniora
 
 
 
Views from Beirut
 
Send us your comments 
 
 
Mr Lahoud refused to recognise Mr Siniora's government and analysts say his security move was effectively a call for a state of emergency.
 
 
The US has urged all parties to remain calm and said that under the constitution the Lebanese cabinet should "temporarily assume executive powers and responsibilities until a new president is elected".
 
 
Shortly before midnight, Mr Lahoud, 71, walked out of the Baabda presidential palace as the national anthem played, ending nine years in office.
 
 
AFP news agency quoted him as telling reporters: "If they do not elect a new consensual president, with the required two-thirds majority, we have men who can stand up."
 
 
The BBC's Kim Ghattas in Beirut says that opponents of Mr Lahoud have been celebrating the departure of man they see as the last remnant of Syrian influence over the country.
 
 
She says the country appears to be in the ultimate political limbo, with the rival parties even in disagreement over whether a state of emergency exists.
 
 
'Not valid'
 
 
A few hours before his term was due to end, Mr Lahoud issued a statement via a spokesman, Rafiq Shalala.
 
 
It said the army would have responsibility for maintaining order throughout the country.
 
 
 
Mr Siniora says he should take over temporarily under the constitution
 
 
"There are conditions and risks on the ground that could lead to a state of emergency," Mr Shalala said.
 
 
However, constitutionally Mr Lahoud could not call for a state of emergency without the backing of the government he did not recognise.
 
 
Mr Shalala said the army would "submit the measures it takes to the cabinet once there is one that is constitutional".
 
 
A spokesman for Mr Siniora told AFP news agency: "The statement issued by the general directorate of the president of the republic is not valid and is unconstitutional. It is as if the statement was never issued."
 
 
The head of the army has refused to comment. Gen Michel Suleiman was appointed by Mr Lahoud but has largely sought to keep the military neutral.
 
 
Our correspondent says there are reports that he has agreed to follow the cabinet's orders but that the situation may become clearer in the morning.
 
 
However, she says the one thing everyone does agrees on, at least for now, is that they do not want a return to violence.
 
 
Tension on streets
 
 
The election of a president requires a two-thirds majority, which means that the pro-Western ruling bloc - with only a slim majority - could not force its preferred candidate through parliament.
 
 
The tension was palpable on the streets as the crisis over electing the president came to a head, with the army deployed in force and schools closed, our correspondent says.
 
 
Checkpoints were set up and the ministry of interior suspended all firearm permits until further notice.
 
 
The crisis has raised fears of civil strife, including the possibility of rival administrations.
 
 
The issue has turned into a regional and international affair.
 
 
The US, Russia, Syria and Iran have all been intensely involved and there has been a lot of diplomatic shuttling between Damascus, Moscow, Tehran and Paris ahead of the end of Mr Lahoud's term.
 
 
 
 
E-mail this to a friend  Printable version 
 
 
Bookmark with:
 
Delicious Digg reddit Facebook StumbleUpon
 
What are these?
 
  VIDEO AND AUDIO NEWS
 
Troops on the streets amid fears of unrest
 
 
 
 
 
LEBANON POLITICAL CRISIS
 
 
 
KEY STORIES
 
Lebanese presidency ends in chaos
 
Lebanese fail to elect president
 
Lebanon president deadline looms
 
France decries Lebanon 'blockage'
 
 
 
BACKGROUND AND ANALYSIS
 
  Lebanon impasse
 
Rival factions are unable to come to an agreement on a new president.
 
 
Beirut diary: 12 November
 
Lebanon vote in balance
 
The Lebanese crisis explained
 
 
 
PROFILES
 
Who are the Maronites?
 
Profile: Fouad Siniora
 
Profile: Sheikh Hassan Nasrallah
 
Quick guide: Hezbollah
 
 
 
 
 
RELATED INTERNET LINKS
 
Lebanese presidency
 
Syria Gate (official site)
 
The BBC is not responsible for the content of external internet sites
 
 
 
TOP MIDDLE EAST STORIES
 
Lebanese presidency ends in chaos
 
 
Saudis to attend Mid-East summit
 
 
Israeli 'tried to spy for Iran'
 
 
| News feeds
 
 
 
MOST POPULAR STORIES NOW
 
MOST E-MAILED MOST READ Africa in pictures: 10-16 June
 
Many flee from Philippines storm
 
Chocolate lorry goes to Timbuktu
 
Australians vote to choose leader
 
Death-cheating cat dubbed bionic
 
Most popular now, in detail MOST E-MAILED MOST READ Lebanese presidency ends in chaos
 
Stricken Antarctic ship evacuated
 
Tanzania surgery mix-up man dies
 
Death-cheating cat dubbed bionic
 
Day in pictures
 
Most popular now, in detail
 
 
 
 
FEATURES, VIEWS, ANALYSIS  Shock to system
 
Rape case adds to notoriety of Brazilian prison regime
 
  Black day
 
Zimbabwe rhino killings put breeding project in jeopardy
 
  Day in pictures
 
Some of the most striking images from around the world
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
PRODUCTS & SERVICESE-mail news Mobiles Alerts News feeds Podcasts
 
BBC Copyright NoticeMMVIIMost Popular Now | The most read story in Australasia is: Lebanese presidency ends in chaos Back to top ^^ Help Privacy and cookies policy News sources About the BBC Contact us 
 
 
  HomeNewsSportRadioTVWeatherLanguages
 
   
 
 
UK versionInternational version|About the versions Low graphics|Accessibility help  One-Minute World News
 
 
  News services
 
Your news when you want it
 
 
 
News Front Page
 
 
Africa
 
Americas
 
Asia-Pacific
 
Europe
 
Middle East
 
South Asia
 
UK
 
Business
 
Health
 
Science/Nature
 
Technology
 
Entertainment
 
Also in the news
 
-----------------
 
Video and Audio
 
-----------------
 
Have Your Say
 
In Pictures
 
Country Profiles
 
Special Reports RELATED BBC SITES
 
SPORT
 
WEATHER
 
ON THIS DAY
 
EDITORS' BLOG
 
 
LANGUAGES
 
Arabic
 
Persian
 
Pashto
 
Turkish
 
French
 
More
 
  Last Updated: Friday, 23 November 2007, 22:50 GMT 
 
 
E-mail this to a friend  Printable version 
 
 
Lebanese presidency ends in chaos 
 
 
Mr Lahoud left office refusing to recognise the PM's government
 
The term of Lebanon's president has ended with no elected successor and a bitter dispute over who is in power.
 
Before pro-Syrian President Emile Lahoud left the presidential palace at midnight (2200 GMT) he issued an order that the army should take over control.
 
 
But pro-Western PM Fouad Siniora rejected the move and says that under the constitution he and his cabinet are in temporary power.
 
 
The latest in a series of attempts to find a new president failed on Friday.
 
 
The president is elected by parliament, but a vote was scuppered after the pro-Syrian opposition did not allow the necessary quorum to be achieved. A new vote has been scheduled for 30 November.
 
 
KEY STEPS
 
Vote scheduled 1300 (1100 GMT) Friday but not held. Speaker sets vote for 30 November
 
President Emile Lahoud's term expires 0000 Saturday
 
If the presidency become vacant, constitution says presidential powers passed to PM Fouad Siniora
 
 
 
Views from Beirut
 
Send us your comments 
 
 
Mr Lahoud refused to recognise Mr Siniora's government and analysts say his security move was effectively a call for a state of emergency.
 
 
The US has urged all parties to remain calm and said that under the constitution the Lebanese cabinet should "temporarily assume executive powers and responsibilities until a new president is elected".
 
 
Shortly before midnight, Mr Lahoud, 71, walked out of the Baabda presidential palace as the national anthem played, ending nine years in office.
 
 
AFP news agency quoted him as telling reporters: "If they do not elect a new consensual president, with the required two-thirds majority, we have men who can stand up."
 
 
The BBC's Kim Ghattas in Beirut says that opponents of Mr Lahoud have been celebrating the departure of man they see as the last remnant of Syrian influence over the country.
 
 
She says the country appears to be in the ultimate political limbo, with the rival parties even in disagreement over whether a state of emergency exists.
 
 
'Not valid'
 
 
A few hours before his term was due to end, Mr Lahoud issued a statement via a spokesman, Rafiq Shalala.
 
 
It said the army would have responsibility for maintaining order throughout the country.
 
 
 
Mr Siniora says he should take over temporarily under the constitution
 
 
"There are conditions and risks on the ground that could lead to a state of emergency," Mr Shalala said.
 
 
However, constitutionally Mr Lahoud could not call for a state of emergency without the backing of the government he did not recognise.
 
 
Mr Shalala said the army would "submit the measures it takes to the cabinet once there is one that is constitutional".
 
 
A spokesman for Mr Siniora told AFP news agency: "The statement issued by the general directorate of the president of the republic is not valid and is unconstitutional. It is as if the statement was never issued."
 
 
The head of the army has refused to comment. Gen Michel Suleiman was appointed by Mr Lahoud but has largely sought to keep the military neutral.
 
 
Our correspondent says there are reports that he has agreed to follow the cabinet's orders but that the situation may become clearer in the morning.
 
 
However, she says the one thing everyone does agrees on, at least for now, is that they do not want a return to violence.
 
 
Tension on streets
 
 
The election of a president requires a two-thirds majority, which means that the pro-Western ruling bloc - with only a slim majority - could not force its preferred candidate through parliament.
 
 
The tension was palpable on the streets as the crisis over electing the president came to a head, with the army deployed in force and schools closed, our correspondent says.
 
 
Checkpoints were set up and the ministry of interior suspended all firearm permits until further notice.
 
 
The crisis has raised fears of civil strife, including the possibility of rival administrations.
 
 
The issue has turned into a regional and international affair.
 
 
The US, Russia, Syria and Iran have all been intensely involved and there has been a lot of diplomatic shuttling between Damascus, Moscow, Tehran and Paris ahead of the end of Mr Lahoud's term.
 
 
 
 
E-mail this to a friend  Printable version 
 
 
Bookmark with:
 
Delicious Digg reddit Facebook StumbleUpon
 
What are these?
 
  VIDEO AND AUDIO NEWS
 
Troops on the streets amid fears of unrest
 
 
 
 
 
LEBANON POLITICAL CRISIS
 
 
 
KEY STORIES
 
Lebanese presidency ends in chaos
 
Lebanese fail to elect president
 
Lebanon president deadline looms
 
France decries Lebanon 'blockage'
 
 
 
BACKGROUND AND ANALYSIS
 
  Lebanon impasse
 
Rival factions are unable to come to an agreement on a new president.
 
 
Beirut diary: 12 November
 
Lebanon vote in balance
 
The Lebanese crisis explained
 
 
 
PROFILES
 
Who are the Maronites?
 
Profile: Fouad Siniora
 
Profile: Sheikh Hassan Nasrallah
 
Quick guide: Hezbollah
 
 
 
 
 
RELATED INTERNET LINKS
 
Lebanese presidency
 
Syria Gate (official site)
 
The BBC is not responsible for the content of external internet sites
 
 
 
TOP MIDDLE EAST STORIES
 
Lebanese presidency ends in chaos
 
 
Saudis to attend Mid-East summit
 
 
Israeli 'tried to spy for Iran'
 
 
| News feeds
 
 
 
MOST POPULAR STORIES NOW
 
MOST E-MAILED MOST READ Africa in pictures: 10-16 June
 
Many flee from Philippines storm
 
Chocolate lorry goes to Timbuktu
 
Australians vote to choose leader
 
Death-cheating cat dubbed bionic
 
Most popular now, in detail MOST E-MAILED MOST READ Lebanese presidency ends in chaos
 
Stricken Antarctic ship evacuated
 
Tanzania surgery mix-up man dies
 
Death-cheating cat dubbed bionic
 
Day in pictures
 
Most popular now, in detail
 
 
 
 
FEATURES, VIEWS, ANALYSIS  Shock to system
 
Rape case adds to notoriety of Brazilian prison regime
 
  Black day
 
Zimbabwe rhino killings put breeding project in jeopardy
 
  Day in pictures
 
Some of the most striking images from around the world
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
PRODUCTS & SERVICESE-mail news Mobiles Alerts News feeds Podcasts
 
BBC Copyright NoticeMMVIIMost Popular Now | The most read story in Australasia is: Lebanese presidency ends in chaos Back to top ^^ Help Privacy and cookies policy News sources About the BBC Contact us 
 
 
  HomeNewsSportRadioTVWeatherLanguages
 
   
 
 
UK versionInternational version|About the versions Low graphics|Accessibility help  One-Minute World News
 
 
  News services
 
Your news when you want it
 
 
 
News Front Page
 
 
Africa
 
Americas
 
Asia-Pacific
 
Europe
 
Middle East
 
South Asia
 
UK
 
Business
 
Health
 
Science/Nature
 
Technology
 
Entertainment
 
Also in the news
 
-----------------
 
Video and Audio
 
-----------------
 
Have Your Say
 
In Pictures
 
Country Profiles
 
Special Reports RELATED BBC SITES
 
SPORT
 
WEATHER
 
ON THIS DAY
 
EDITORS' BLOG
 
 
LANGUAGES
 
Arabic
 
Persian
 
Pashto
 
Turkish
 
French
 
More
 
  Last Updated: Friday, 23 November 2007, 22:50 GMT 
 
 
E-mail this to a friend  Printable version 
 
 
Lebanese presidency ends in chaos 
 
 
Mr Lahoud left office refusing to recognise the PM's government
 
The term of Lebanon's president has ended with no elected successor and a bitter dispute over who is in power.
 
Before pro-Syrian President Emile Lahoud left the presidential palace at midnight (2200 GMT) he issued an order that the army should take over control.
 
 
But pro-Western PM Fouad Siniora rejected the move and says that under the constitution he and his cabinet are in temporary power.
 
 
The latest in a series of attempts to find a new president failed on Friday.
 
 
The president is elected by parliament, but a vote was scuppered after the pro-Syrian opposition did not allow the necessary quorum to be achieved. A new vote has been scheduled for 30 November.
 
 
KEY STEPS
 
Vote scheduled 1300 (1100 GMT) Friday but not held. Speaker sets vote for 30 November
 
President Emile Lahoud's term expires 0000 Saturday
 
If the presidency become vacant, constitution says presidential powers passed to PM Fouad Siniora
 
 
 
Views from Beirut
 
Send us your comments 
 
 
Mr Lahoud refused to recognise Mr Siniora's government and analysts say his security move was effectively a call for a state of emergency.
 
 
The US has urged all parties to remain calm and said that under the constitution the Lebanese cabinet should "temporarily assume executive powers and responsibilities until a new president is elected".
 
 
Shortly before midnight, Mr Lahoud, 71, walked out of the Baabda presidential palace as the national anthem played, ending nine years in office.
 
 
AFP news agency quoted him as telling reporters: "If they do not elect a new consensual president, with the required two-thirds majority, we have men who can stand up."
 
 
The BBC's Kim Ghattas in Beirut says that opponents of Mr Lahoud have been celebrating the departure of man they see as the last remnant of Syrian influence over the country.
 
 
She says the country appears to be in the ultimate political limbo, with the rival parties even in disagreement over whether a state of emergency exists.
 
 
'Not valid'
 
 
A few hours before his term was due to end, Mr Lahoud issued a statement via a spokesman, Rafiq Shalala.
 
 
It said the army would have responsibility for maintaining order throughout the country.
 
 
 
Mr Siniora says he should take over temporarily under the constitution
 
 
"There are conditions and risks on the ground that could lead to a state of emergency," Mr Shalala said.
 
 
However, constitutionally Mr Lahoud could not call for a state of emergency without the backing of the government he did not recognise.
 
 
Mr Shalala said the army would "submit the measures it takes to the cabinet once there is one that is constitutional".
 
 
A spokesman for Mr Siniora told AFP news agency: "The statement issued by the general directorate of the president of the republic is not valid and is unconstitutional. It is as if the statement was never issued."
 
 
The head of the army has refused to comment. Gen Michel Suleiman was appointed by Mr Lahoud but has largely sought to keep the military neutral.
 
 
Our correspondent says there are reports that he has agreed to follow the cabinet's orders but that the situation may become clearer in the morning.
 
 
However, she says the one thing everyone does agrees on, at least for now, is that they do not want a return to violence.
 
 
Tension on streets
 
 
The election of a president requires a two-thirds majority, which means that the pro-Western ruling bloc - with only a slim majority - could not force its preferred candidate through parliament.
 
 
The tension was palpable on the streets as the crisis over electing the president came to a head, with the army deployed in force and schools closed, our correspondent says.
 
 
Checkpoints were set up and the ministry of interior suspended all firearm permits until further notice.
 
 
The crisis has raised fears of civil strife, including the possibility of rival administrations.
 
 
The issue has turned into a regional and international affair.
 
 
The US, Russia, Syria and Iran have all been intensely involved and there has been a lot of diplomatic shuttling between Damascus, Moscow, Tehran and Paris ahead of the end of Mr Lahoud's term.
 
 
 
 
E-mail this to a friend  Printable version 
 
 
Bookmark with:
 
Delicious Digg reddit Facebook StumbleUpon
 
What are these?
 
  VIDEO AND AUDIO NEWS
 
Troops on the streets amid fears of unrest
 
 
 
 
 
LEBANON POLITICAL CRISIS
 
 
 
KEY STORIES
 
Lebanese presidency ends in chaos
 
Lebanese fail to elect president
 
Lebanon president deadline looms
 
France decries Lebanon 'blockage'
 
 
 
BACKGROUND AND ANALYSIS
 
  Lebanon impasse
 
Rival factions are unable to come to an agreement on a new president.
 
 
Beirut diary: 12 November
 
Lebanon vote in balance
 
The Lebanese crisis explained
 
 
 
PROFILES
 
Who are the Maronites?
 
Profile: Fouad Siniora
 
Profile: Sheikh Hassan Nasrallah
 
Quick guide: Hezbollah
 
 
 
 
 
RELATED INTERNET LINKS
 
Lebanese presidency
 
Syria Gate (official site)
 
The BBC is not responsible for the content of external internet sites
 
 
 
TOP MIDDLE EAST STORIES
 
Lebanese presidency ends in chaos
 
 
Saudis to attend Mid-East summit
 
 
Israeli 'tried to spy for Iran'
 
 
| News feeds
 
 
 
MOST POPULAR STORIES NOW
 
MOST E-MAILED MOST READ Africa in pictures: 10-16 June
 
Many flee from Philippines storm
 
Chocolate lorry goes to Timbuktu
 
Australians vote to choose leader
 
Death-cheating cat dubbed bionic
 
Most popular now, in detail MOST E-MAILED MOST READ Lebanese presidency ends in chaos
 
Stricken Antarctic ship evacuated
 
Tanzania surgery mix-up man dies
 
Death-cheating cat dubbed bionic
 
Day in pictures
 
Most popular now, in detail
 
 
 
 
FEATURES, VIEWS, ANALYSIS  Shock to system
 
Rape case adds to notoriety of Brazilian prison regime
 
  Black day
 
Zimbabwe rhino killings put breeding project in jeopardy
 
  Day in pictures
 
Some of the most striking images from around the world
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
PRODUCTS & SERVICESE-mail news Mobiles Alerts News feeds Podcasts
 
BBC Copyright NoticeMMVIIMost Popular Now | The most read story in Australasia is: Lebanese presidency ends in chaos Back to top ^^ Help Privacy and cookies policy News sources About the BBC Contact us 
 
 
  HomeNewsSportRadioTVWeatherLanguages
 
   
 
 
UK versionInternational version|About the versions Low graphics|Accessibility help  One-Minute World News
 
 
  News services
 
Your news when you want it
 
 
 
News Front Page
 
 
Africa
 
Americas
 
Asia-Pacific
 
Europe
 
Middle East
 
South Asia
 
UK
 
Business
 
Health
 
Science/Nature
 
Technology
 
Entertainment
 
Also in the news
 
-----------------
 
Video and Audio
 
-----------------
 
Have Your Say
 
In Pictures
 
Country Profiles
 
Special Reports RELATED BBC SITES
 
SPORT
 
WEATHER
 
ON THIS DAY
 
EDITORS' BLOG
 
 
LANGUAGES
 
Arabic
 
Persian
 
Pashto
 
Turkish
 
French
 
More
 
  Last Updated: Friday, 23 November 2007, 22:50 GMT 
 
 
E-mail this to a friend  Printable version 
 
 
Lebanese presidency ends in chaos 
 
 
Mr Lahoud left office refusing to recognise the PM's government
 
The term of Lebanon's president has ended with no elected successor and a bitter dispute over who is in power.
 
Before pro-Syrian President Emile Lahoud left the presidential palace at midnight (2200 GMT) he issued an order that the army should take over control.
 
 
But pro-Western PM Fouad Siniora rejected the move and says that under the constitution he and his cabinet are in temporary power.
 
 
The latest in a series of attempts to find a new president failed on Friday.
 
 
The president is elected by parliament, but a vote was scuppered after the pro-Syrian opposition did not allow the necessary quorum to be achieved. A new vote has been scheduled for 30 November.
 
 
KEY STEPS
 
Vote scheduled 1300 (1100 GMT) Friday but not held. Speaker sets vote for 30 November
 
President Emile Lahoud's term expires 0000 Saturday
 
If the presidency become vacant, constitution says presidential powers passed to PM Fouad Siniora
 
 
 
Views from Beirut
 
Send us your comments 
 
 
Mr Lahoud refused to recognise Mr Siniora's government and analysts say his security move was effectively a call for a state of emergency.
 
 
The US has urged all parties to remain calm and said that under the constitution the Lebanese cabinet should "temporarily assume executive powers and responsibilities until a new president is elected".
 
 
Shortly before midnight, Mr Lahoud, 71, walked out of the Baabda presidential palace as the national anthem played, ending nine years in office.
 
 
AFP news agency quoted him as telling reporters: "If they do not elect a new consensual president, with the required two-thirds majority, we have men who can stand up."
 
 
The BBC's Kim Ghattas in Beirut says that opponents of Mr Lahoud have been celebrating the departure of man they see as the last remnant of Syrian influence over the country.
 
 
She says the country appears to be in the ultimate political limbo, with the rival parties even in disagreement over whether a state of emergency exists.
 
 
'Not valid'
 
 
A few hours before his term was due to end, Mr Lahoud issued a statement via a spokesman, Rafiq Shalala.
 
 
It said the army would have responsibility for maintaining order throughout the country.
 
 
 
Mr Siniora says he should take over temporarily under the constitution
 
 
"There are conditions and risks on the ground that could lead to a state of emergency," Mr Shalala said.
 
 
However, constitutionally Mr Lahoud could not call for a state of emergency without the backing of the government he did not recognise.
 
 
Mr Shalala said the army would "submit the measures it takes to the cabinet once there is one that is constitutional".
 
 
A spokesman for Mr Siniora told AFP news agency: "The statement issued by the general directorate of the president of the republic is not valid and is unconstitutional. It is as if the statement was never issued."
 
 
The head of the army has refused to comment. Gen Michel Suleiman was appointed by Mr Lahoud but has largely sought to keep the military neutral.
 
 
Our correspondent says there are reports that he has agreed to follow the cabinet's orders but that the situation may become clearer in the morning.
 
 
However, she says the one thing everyone does agrees on, at least for now, is that they do not want a return to violence.
 
 
Tension on streets
 
 
The election of a president requires a two-thirds majority, which means that the pro-Western ruling bloc - with only a slim majority - could not force its preferred candidate through parliament.
 
 
The tension was palpable on the streets as the crisis over electing the president came to a head, with the army deployed in force and schools closed, our correspondent says.
 
 
Checkpoints were set up and the ministry of interior suspended all firearm permits until further notice.
 
 
The crisis has raised fears of civil strife, including the possibility of rival administrations.
 
 
The issue has turned into a regional and international affair.
 
 
The US, Russia, Syria and Iran have all been intensely involved and there has been a lot of diplomatic shuttling between Damascus, Moscow, Tehran and Paris ahead of the end of Mr Lahoud's term.
 
 
 
 
E-mail this to a friend  Printable version 
 
 
Bookmark with:
 
Delicious Digg reddit Facebook StumbleUpon
 
What are these?
 
  VIDEO AND AUDIO NEWS
 
Troops on the streets amid fears of unrest
 
 
 
 
 
LEBANON POLITICAL CRISIS
 
 
 
KEY STORIES
 
Lebanese presidency ends in chaos
 
Lebanese fail to elect president
 
Lebanon president deadline looms
 
France decries Lebanon 'blockage'
 
 
 
BACKGROUND AND ANALYSIS
 
  Lebanon impasse
 
Rival factions are unable to come to an agreement on a new president.
 
 
Beirut diary: 12 November
 
Lebanon vote in balance
 
The Lebanese crisis explained
 
 
 
PROFILES
 
Who are the Maronites?
 
Profile: Fouad Siniora
 
Profile: Sheikh Hassan Nasrallah
 
Quick guide: Hezbollah
 
 
 
 
 
RELATED INTERNET LINKS
 
Lebanese presidency
 
Syria Gate (official site)
 
The BBC is not responsible for the content of external internet sites
 
 
 
TOP MIDDLE EAST STORIES
 
Lebanese presidency ends in chaos
 
 
Saudis to attend Mid-East summit
 
 
Israeli 'tried to spy for Iran'
 
 
| News feeds
 
 
 
MOST POPULAR STORIES NOW
 
MOST E-MAILED MOST READ Africa in pictures: 10-16 June
 
Many flee from Philippines storm
 
Chocolate lorry goes to Timbuktu
 
Australians vote to choose leader
 
Death-cheating cat dubbed bionic
 
Most popular now, in detail MOST E-MAILED MOST READ Lebanese presidency ends in chaos
 
Stricken Antarctic ship evacuated
 
Tanzania surgery mix-up man dies
 
Death-cheating cat dubbed bionic
 
Day in pictures
 
Most popular now, in detail
 
 
 
 
FEATURES, VIEWS, ANALYSIS  Shock to system
 
Rape case adds to notoriety of Brazilian prison regime
 
  Black day
 
Zimbabwe rhino killings put breeding project in jeopardy
 
  Day in pictures
 
Some of the most striking images from around the world
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
PRODUCTS & SERVICESE-mail news Mobiles Alerts News feeds Podcasts
 
BBC Copyright NoticeMMVIIMost Popular Now | The most read story in Australasia is: Lebanese presidency ends in chaos Back to top ^^ Help Privacy and cookies policy News sources About the BBC Contact us 
 
 
  HomeNewsSportRadioTVWeatherLanguages
 
   
 
 
UK versionInternational version|About the versions Low graphics|Accessibility help  One-Minute World News
 
 
  News services
 
Your news when you want it
 
 
 
News Front Page
 
 
Africa
 
Americas
 
Asia-Pacific
 
Europe
 
Middle East
 
South Asia
 
UK
 
Business
 
Health
 
Science/Nature
 
Technology
 
Entertainment
 
Also in the news
 
-----------------
 
Video and Audio
 
-----------------
 
Have Your Say
 
In Pictures
 
Country Profiles
 
Special Reports RELATED BBC SITES
 
SPORT
 
WEATHER
 
ON THIS DAY
 
EDITORS' BLOG
 
 
LANGUAGES
 
Arabic
 
Persian
 
Pashto
 
Turkish
 
French
 
More
 
  Last Updated: Friday, 23 November 2007, 22:50 GMT 
 
 
E-mail this to a friend  Printable version 
 
 
Lebanese presidency ends in chaos 
 
 
Mr Lahoud left office refusing to recognise the PM's government
 
The term of Lebanon's president has ended with no elected successor and a bitter dispute over who is in power.
 
Before pro-Syrian President Emile Lahoud left the presidential palace at midnight (2200 GMT) he issued an order that the army should take over control.
 
 
But pro-Western PM Fouad Siniora rejected the move and says that under the constitution he and his cabinet are in temporary power.
 
 
The latest in a series of attempts to find a new president failed on Friday.
 
 
The president is elected by parliament, but a vote was scuppered after the pro-Syrian opposition did not allow the necessary quorum to be achieved. A new vote has been scheduled for 30 November.
 
 
KEY STEPS
 
Vote scheduled 1300 (1100 GMT) Friday but not held. Speaker sets vote for 30 November
 
President Emile Lahoud's term expires 0000 Saturday
 
If the presidency become vacant, constitution says presidential powers passed to PM Fouad Siniora
 
 
 
Views from Beirut
 
Send us your comments 
 
 
Mr Lahoud refused to recognise Mr Siniora's government and analysts say his security move was effectively a call for a state of emergency.
 
 
The US has urged all parties to remain calm and said that under the constitution the Lebanese cabinet should "temporarily assume executive powers and responsibilities until a new president is elected".
 
 
Shortly before midnight, Mr Lahoud, 71, walked out of the Baabda presidential palace as the national anthem played, ending nine years in office.
 
 
AFP news agency quoted him as telling reporters: "If they do not elect a new consensual president, with the required two-thirds majority, we have men who can stand up."
 
 
The BBC's Kim Ghattas in Beirut says that opponents of Mr Lahoud have been celebrating the departure of man they see as the last remnant of Syrian influence over the country.
 
 
She says the country appears to be in the ultimate political limbo, with the rival parties even in disagreement over whether a state of emergency exists.
 
 
'Not valid'
 
 
A few hours before his term was due to end, Mr Lahoud issued a statement via a spokesman, Rafiq Shalala.
 
 
It said the army would have responsibility for maintaining order throughout the country.
 
 
 
Mr Siniora says he should take over temporarily under the constitution
 
 
"There are conditions and risks on the ground that could lead to a state of emergency," Mr Shalala said.
 
 
However, constitutionally Mr Lahoud could not call for a state of emergency without the backing of the government he did not recognise.
 
 
Mr Shalala said the army would "submit the measures it takes to the cabinet once there is one that is constitutional".
 
 
A spokesman for Mr Siniora told AFP news agency: "The statement issued by the general directorate of the president of the republic is not valid and is unconstitutional. It is as if the statement was never issued."
 
 
The head of the army has refused to comment. Gen Michel Suleiman was appointed by Mr Lahoud but has largely sought to keep the military neutral.
 
 
Our correspondent says there are reports that he has agreed to follow the cabinet's orders but that the situation may become clearer in the morning.
 
 
However, she says the one thing everyone does agrees on, at least for now, is that they do not want a return to violence.
 
 
Tension on streets
 
 
The election of a president requires a two-thirds majority, which means that the pro-Western ruling bloc - with only a slim majority - could not force its preferred candidate through parliament.
 
 
The tension was palpable on the streets as the crisis over electing the president came to a head, with the army deployed in force and schools closed, our correspondent says.
 
 
Checkpoints were set up and the ministry of interior suspended all firearm permits until further notice.
 
 
The crisis has raised fears of civil strife, including the possibility of rival administrations.
 
 
The issue has turned into a regional and international affair.
 
 
The US, Russia, Syria and Iran have all been intensely involved and there has been a lot of diplomatic shuttling between Damascus, Moscow, Tehran and Paris ahead of the end of Mr Lahoud's term.
 
 
 
 
E-mail this to a friend  Printable version 
 
 
Bookmark with:
 
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What are these?
 
  VIDEO AND AUDIO NEWS
 
Troops on the streets amid fears of unrest
 
 
 
 
 
LEBANON POLITICAL CRISIS
 
 
 
KEY STORIES
 
Lebanese presidency ends in chaos
 
Lebanese fail to elect president
 
Lebanon president deadline looms
 
France decries Lebanon 'blockage'
 
 
 
BACKGROUND AND ANALYSIS
 
  Lebanon impasse
 
Rival factions are unable to come to an agreement on a new president.
 
 
Beirut diary: 12 November
 
Lebanon vote in balance
 
The Lebanese crisis explained
 
 
 
PROFILES
 
Who are the Maronites?
 
Profile: Fouad Siniora
 
Profile: Sheikh Hassan Nasrallah
 
Quick guide: Hezbollah
 
 
 
 
 
RELATED INTERNET LINKS
 
Lebanese presidency
 
Syria Gate (official site)
 
The BBC is not responsible for the content of external internet sites
 
 
 
TOP MIDDLE EAST STORIES
 
Lebanese presidency ends in chaos
 
 
Saudis to attend Mid-East summit
 
 
Israeli 'tried to spy for Iran'
 
 
| News feeds
 
 
 
MOST POPULAR STORIES NOW
 
MOST E-MAILED MOST READ Africa in pictures: 10-16 June
 
Many flee from Philippines storm
 
Chocolate lorry goes to Timbuktu
 
Australians vote to choose leader
 
Death-cheating cat dubbed bionic
 
Most popular now, in detail MOST E-MAILED MOST READ Lebanese presidency ends in chaos
 
Stricken Antarctic ship evacuated
 
Tanzania surgery mix-up man dies
 
Death-cheating cat dubbed bionic
 
Day in pictures
 
Most popular now, in detail
 
 
 
 
FEATURES, VIEWS, ANALYSIS  Shock to system
 
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  Last Updated: Friday, 23 November 2007, 22:50 GMT 
 
 
E-mail this to a friend  Printable version 
 
 
Lebanese presidency ends in chaos 
 
 
Mr Lahoud left office refusing to recognise the PM's government
 
The term of Lebanon's president has ended with no elected successor and a bitter dispute over who is in power.
 
Before pro-Syrian President Emile Lahoud left the presidential palace at midnight (2200 GMT) he issued an order that the army should take over control.
 
 
But pro-Western PM Fouad Siniora rejected the move and says that under the constitution he and his cabinet are in temporary power.
 
 
The latest in a series of attempts to find a new president failed on Friday.
 
 
The president is elected by parliament, but a vote was scuppered after the pro-Syrian opposition did not allow the necessary quorum to be achieved. A new vote has been scheduled for 30 November.
 
 
KEY STEPS
 
Vote scheduled 1300 (1100 GMT) Friday but not held. Speaker sets vote for 30 November
 
President Emile Lahoud's term expires 0000 Saturday
 
If the presidency become vacant, constitution says presidential powers passed to PM Fouad Siniora
 
 
 
Views from Beirut
 
Send us your comments 
 
 
Mr Lahoud refused to recognise Mr Siniora's government and analysts say his security move was effectively a call for a state of emergency.
 
 
The US has urged all parties to remain calm and said that under the constitution the Lebanese cabinet should "temporarily assume executive powers and responsibilities until a new president is elected".
 
 
Shortly before midnight, Mr Lahoud, 71, walked out of the Baabda presidential palace as the national anthem played, ending nine years in office.
 
 
AFP news agency quoted him as telling reporters: "If they do not elect a new consensual president, with the required two-thirds majority, we have men who can stand up."
 
 
The BBC's Kim Ghattas in Beirut says that opponents of Mr Lahoud have been celebrating the departure of man they see as the last remnant of Syrian influence over the country.
 
 
She says the country appears to be in the ultimate political limbo, with the rival parties even in disagreement over whether a state of emergency exists.
 
 
'Not valid'
 
 
A few hours before his term was due to end, Mr Lahoud issued a statement via a spokesman, Rafiq Shalala.
 
 
It said the army would have responsibility for maintaining order throughout the country.
 
 
 
Mr Siniora says he should take over temporarily under the constitution
 
 
"There are conditions and risks on the ground that could lead to a state of emergency," Mr Shalala said.
 
 
However, constitutionally Mr Lahoud could not call for a state of emergency without the backing of the government he did not recognise.
 
 
Mr Shalala said the army would "submit the measures it takes to the cabinet once there is one that is constitutional".
 
 
A spokesman for Mr Siniora told AFP news agency: "The statement issued by the general directorate of the president of the republic is not valid and is unconstitutional. It is as if the statement was never issued."
 
 
The head of the army has refused to comment. Gen Michel Suleiman was appointed by Mr Lahoud but has largely sought to keep the military neutral.
 
 
Our correspondent says there are reports that he has agreed to follow the cabinet's orders but that the situation may become clearer in the morning.
 
 
However, she says the one thing everyone does agrees on, at least for now, is that they do not want a return to violence.
 
 
Tension on streets
 
 
The election of a president requires a two-thirds majority, which means that the pro-Western ruling bloc - with only a slim majority - could not force its preferred candidate through parliament.
 
 
The tension was palpable on the streets as the crisis over electing the president came to a head, with the army deployed in force and schools closed, our correspondent says.
 
 
Checkpoints were set up and the ministry of interior suspended all firearm permits until further notice.
 
 
The crisis has raised fears of civil strife, including the possibility of rival administrations.
 
 
The issue has turned into a regional and international affair.
 
 
The US, Russia, Syria and Iran have all been intensely involved and there has been a lot of diplomatic shuttling between Damascus, Moscow, Tehran and Paris ahead of the end of Mr Lahoud's term.
 
 
 
 
E-mail this to a friend  Printable version 
 
 
Bookmark with:
 
Delicious Digg reddit Facebook StumbleUpon
 
What are these?
 
  VIDEO AND AUDIO NEWS
 
Troops on the streets amid fears of unrest
 
 
 
 
 
LEBANON POLITICAL CRISIS
 
 
 
KEY STORIES
 
Lebanese presidency ends in chaos
 
Lebanese fail to elect president
 
Lebanon president deadline looms
 
France decries Lebanon 'blockage'
 
 
 
BACKGROUND AND ANALYSIS
 
  Lebanon impasse
 
Rival factions are unable to come to an agreement on a new president.
 
 
Beirut diary: 12 November
 
Lebanon vote in balance
 
The Lebanese crisis explained
 
 
 
PROFILES
 
Who are the Maronites?
 
Profile: Fouad Siniora
 
Profile: Sheikh Hassan Nasrallah
 
Quick guide: Hezbollah
 
 
 
 
 
RELATED INTERNET LINKS
 
Lebanese presidency
 
Syria Gate (official site)
 
The BBC is not responsible for the content of external internet sites
 
 
 
TOP MIDDLE EAST STORIES
 
Lebanese presidency ends in chaos
 
 
Saudis to attend Mid-East summit
 
 
Israeli 'tried to spy for Iran'
 
 
| News feeds
 
 
 
MOST POPULAR STORIES NOW
 
MOST E-MAILED MOST READ Africa in pictures: 10-16 June
 
Many flee from Philippines storm
 
Chocolate lorry goes to Timbuktu
 
Australians vote to choose leader
 
Death-cheating cat dubbed bionic
 
Most popular now, in detail MOST E-MAILED MOST READ Lebanese presidency ends in chaos
 
Stricken Antarctic ship evacuated
 
Tanzania surgery mix-up man dies
 
Death-cheating cat dubbed bionic
 
Day in pictures
 
Most popular now, in detail
 
 
 
 
FEATURES, VIEWS, ANALYSIS  Shock to system
 
Rape case adds to notoriety of Brazilian prison regime
 
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Zimbabwe rhino killings put breeding project in jeopardy
 
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Some of the most striking images from around the world
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
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  Last Updated: Friday, 23 November 2007, 22:50 GMT 
 
 
E-mail this to a friend  Printable version 
 
 
Lebanese presidency ends in chaos 
 
 
Mr Lahoud left office refusing to recognise the PM's government
 
The term of Lebanon's president has ended with no elected successor and a bitter dispute over who is in power.
 
Before pro-Syrian President Emile Lahoud left the presidential palace at midnight (2200 GMT) he issued an order that the army should take over control.
 
 
But pro-Western PM Fouad Siniora rejected the move and says that under the constitution he and his cabinet are in temporary power.
 
 
The latest in a series of attempts to find a new president failed on Friday.
 
 
The president is elected by parliament, but a vote was scuppered after the pro-Syrian opposition did not allow the necessary quorum to be achieved. A new vote has been scheduled for 30 November.
 
 
KEY STEPS
 
Vote scheduled 1300 (1100 GMT) Friday but not held. Speaker sets vote for 30 November
 
President Emile Lahoud's term expires 0000 Saturday
 
If the presidency become vacant, constitution says presidential powers passed to PM Fouad Siniora
 
 
 
Views from Beirut
 
Send us your comments 
 
 
Mr Lahoud refused to recognise Mr Siniora's government and analysts say his security move was effectively a call for a state of emergency.
 
 
The US has urged all parties to remain calm and said that under the constitution the Lebanese cabinet should "temporarily assume executive powers and responsibilities until a new president is elected".
 
 
Shortly before midnight, Mr Lahoud, 71, walked out of the Baabda presidential palace as the national anthem played, ending nine years in office.
 
 
AFP news agency quoted him as telling reporters: "If they do not elect a new consensual president, with the required two-thirds majority, we have men who can stand up."
 
 
The BBC's Kim Ghattas in Beirut says that opponents of Mr Lahoud have been celebrating the departure of man they see as the last remnant of Syrian influence over the country.
 
 
She says the country appears to be in the ultimate political limbo, with the rival parties even in disagreement over whether a state of emergency exists.
 
 
'Not valid'
 
 
A few hours before his term was due to end, Mr Lahoud issued a statement via a spokesman, Rafiq Shalala.
 
 
It said the army would have responsibility for maintaining order throughout the country.
 
 
 
Mr Siniora says he should take over temporarily under the constitution
 
 
"There are conditions and risks on the ground that could lead to a state of emergency," Mr Shalala said.
 
 
However, constitutionally Mr Lahoud could not call for a state of emergency without the backing of the government he did not recognise.
 
 
Mr Shalala said the army would "submit the measures it takes to the cabinet once there is one that is constitutional".
 
 
A spokesman for Mr Siniora told AFP news agency: "The statement issued by the general directorate of the president of the republic is not valid and is unconstitutional. It is as if the statement was never issued."
 
 
The head of the army has refused to comment. Gen Michel Suleiman was appointed by Mr Lahoud but has largely sought to keep the military neutral.
 
 
Our correspondent says there are reports that he has agreed to follow the cabinet's orders but that the situation may become clearer in the morning.
 
 
However, she says the one thing everyone does agrees on, at least for now, is that they do not want a return to violence.
 
 
Tension on streets
 
 
The election of a president requires a two-thirds majority, which means that the pro-Western ruling bloc - with only a slim majority - could not force its preferred candidate through parliament.
 
 
The tension was palpable on the streets as the crisis over electing the president came to a head, with the army deployed in force and schools closed, our correspondent says.
 
 
Checkpoints were set up and the ministry of interior suspended all firearm permits until further notice.
 
 
The crisis has raised fears of civil strife, including the possibility of rival administrations.
 
 
The issue has turned into a regional and international affair.
 
 
The US, Russia, Syria and Iran have all been intensely involved and there has been a lot of diplomatic shuttling between Damascus, Moscow, Tehran and Paris ahead of the end of Mr Lahoud's term.
 
 
 
 
E-mail this to a friend  Printable version 
 
 
Bookmark with:
 
Delicious Digg reddit Facebook StumbleUpon
 
What are these?
 
  VIDEO AND AUDIO NEWS
 
Troops on the streets amid fears of unrest
 
 
 
 
 
LEBANON POLITICAL CRISIS
 
 
 
KEY STORIES
 
Lebanese presidency ends in chaos
 
Lebanese fail to elect president
 
Lebanon president deadline looms
 
France decries Lebanon 'blockage'
 
 
 
BACKGROUND AND ANALYSIS
 
  Lebanon impasse
 
Rival factions are unable to come to an agreement on a new president.
 
 
Beirut diary: 12 November
 
Lebanon vote in balance
 
The Lebanese crisis explained
 
 
 
PROFILES
 
Who are the Maronites?
 
Profile: Fouad Siniora
 
Profile: Sheikh Hassan Nasrallah
 
Quick guide: Hezbollah
 
 
 
 
 
RELATED INTERNET LINKS
 
Lebanese presidency
 
Syria Gate (official site)
 
The BBC is not responsible for the content of external internet sites
 
 
 
TOP MIDDLE EAST STORIES
 
Lebanese presidency ends in chaos
 
 
Saudis to attend Mid-East summit
 
 
Israeli 'tried to spy for Iran'
 
 
| News feeds
 
 
 
MOST POPULAR STORIES NOW
 
MOST E-MAILED MOST READ Africa in pictures: 10-16 June
 
Many flee from Philippines storm
 
Chocolate lorry goes to Timbuktu
 
Australians vote to choose leader
 
Death-cheating cat dubbed bionic
 
Most popular now, in detail MOST E-MAILED MOST READ Lebanese presidency ends in chaos
 
Stricken Antarctic ship evacuated
 
Tanzania surgery mix-up man dies
 
Death-cheating cat dubbed bionic
 
Day in pictures
 
Most popular now, in detail
 
 
 
 
FEATURES, VIEWS, ANALYSIS  Shock to system
 
Rape case adds to notoriety of Brazilian prison regime
 
  Black day
 
Zimbabwe rhino killings put breeding project in jeopardy
 
  Day in pictures
 
Some of the most striking images from around the world
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
PRODUCTS & SERVICESE-mail news Mobiles Alerts News feeds Podcasts
 
BBC Copyright NoticeMMVIIMost Popular Now | The most read story in Australasia is: Lebanese presidency ends in chaos Back to top ^^ Help Privacy and cookies policy News sources About the BBC Contact us 
 
 
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Pashto
 
Turkish
 
French
 
More
 
  Last Updated: Friday, 23 November 2007, 22:50 GMT 
 
 
E-mail this to a friend  Printable version 
 
 
Lebanese presidency ends in chaos 
 
 
Mr Lahoud left office refusing to recognise the PM's government
 
The term of Lebanon's president has ended with no elected successor and a bitter dispute over who is in power.
 
Before pro-Syrian President Emile Lahoud left the presidential palace at midnight (2200 GMT) he issued an order that the army should take over control.
 
 
But pro-Western PM Fouad Siniora rejected the move and says that under the constitution he and his cabinet are in temporary power.
 
 
The latest in a series of attempts to find a new president failed on Friday.
 
 
The president is elected by parliament, but a vote was scuppered after the pro-Syrian opposition did not allow the necessary quorum to be achieved. A new vote has been scheduled for 30 November.
 
 
KEY STEPS
 
Vote scheduled 1300 (1100 GMT) Friday but not held. Speaker sets vote for 30 November
 
President Emile Lahoud's term expires 0000 Saturday
 
If the presidency become vacant, constitution says presidential powers passed to PM Fouad Siniora
 
 
 
Views from Beirut
 
Send us your comments 
 
 
Mr Lahoud refused to recognise Mr Siniora's government and analysts say his security move was effectively a call for a state of emergency.
 
 
The US has urged all parties to remain calm and said that under the constitution the Lebanese cabinet should "temporarily assume executive powers and responsibilities until a new president is elected".
 
 
Shortly before midnight, Mr Lahoud, 71, walked out of the Baabda presidential palace as the national anthem played, ending nine years in office.
 
 
AFP news agency quoted him as telling reporters: "If they do not elect a new consensual president, with the required two-thirds majority, we have men who can stand up."
 
 
The BBC's Kim Ghattas in Beirut says that opponents of Mr Lahoud have been celebrating the departure of man they see as the last remnant of Syrian influence over the country.
 
 
She says the country appears to be in the ultimate political limbo, with the rival parties even in disagreement over whether a state of emergency exists.
 
 
'Not valid'
 
 
A few hours before his term was due to end, Mr Lahoud issued a statement via a spokesman, Rafiq Shalala.
 
 
It said the army would have responsibility for maintaining order throughout the country.
 
 
 
Mr Siniora says he should take over temporarily under the constitution
 
 
"There are conditions and risks on the ground that could lead to a state of emergency," Mr Shalala said.
 
 
However, constitutionally Mr Lahoud could not call for a state of emergency without the backing of the government he did not recognise.
 
 
Mr Shalala said the army would "submit the measures it takes to the cabinet once there is one that is constitutional".
 
 
A spokesman for Mr Siniora told AFP news agency: "The statement issued by the general directorate of the president of the republic is not valid and is unconstitutional. It is as if the statement was never issued."
 
 
The head of the army has refused to comment. Gen Michel Suleiman was appointed by Mr Lahoud but has largely sought to keep the military neutral.
 
 
Our correspondent says there are reports that he has agreed to follow the cabinet's orders but that the situation may become clearer in the morning.
 
 
However, she says the one thing everyone does agrees on, at least for now, is that they do not want a return to violence.
 
 
Tension on streets
 
 
The election of a president requires a two-thirds majority, which means that the pro-Western ruling bloc - with only a slim majority - could not force its preferred candidate through parliament.
 
 
The tension was palpable on the streets as the crisis over electing the president came to a head, with the army deployed in force and schools closed, our correspondent says.
 
 
Checkpoints were set up and the ministry of interior suspended all firearm permits until further notice.
 
 
The crisis has raised fears of civil strife, including the possibility of rival administrations.
 
 
The issue has turned into a regional and international affair.
 
 
The US, Russia, Syria and Iran have all been intensely involved and there has been a lot of diplomatic shuttling between Damascus, Moscow, Tehran and Paris ahead of the end of Mr Lahoud's term.
 
 
 
 
E-mail this to a friend  Printable version 
 
 
Bookmark with:
 
Delicious Digg reddit Facebook StumbleUpon
 
What are these?
 
  VIDEO AND AUDIO NEWS
 
Troops on the streets amid fears of unrest
 
 
 
 
 
LEBANON POLITICAL CRISIS
 
 
 
KEY STORIES
 
Lebanese presidency ends in chaos
 
Lebanese fail to elect president
 
Lebanon president deadline looms
 
France decries Lebanon 'blockage'
 
 
 
BACKGROUND AND ANALYSIS
 
  Lebanon impasse
 
Rival factions are unable to come to an agreement on a new president.
 
 
Beirut diary: 12 November
 
Lebanon vote in balance
 
The Lebanese crisis explained
 
 
 
PROFILES
 
Who are the Maronites?
 
Profile: Fouad Siniora
 
Profile: Sheikh Hassan Nasrallah
 
Quick guide: Hezbollah
 
 
 
 
 
RELATED INTERNET LINKS
 
Lebanese presidency
 
Syria Gate (official site)
 
The BBC is not responsible for the content of external internet sites
 
 
 
TOP MIDDLE EAST STORIES
 
Lebanese presidency ends in chaos
 
 
Saudis to attend Mid-East summit
 
 
Israeli 'tried to spy for Iran'
 
 
| News feeds
 
 
 
MOST POPULAR STORIES NOW
 
MOST E-MAILED MOST READ Africa in pictures: 10-16 June
 
Many flee from Philippines storm
 
Chocolate lorry goes to Timbuktu
 
Australians vote to choose leader
 
Death-cheating cat dubbed bionic
 
Most popular now, in detail MOST E-MAILED MOST READ Lebanese presidency ends in chaos
 
Stricken Antarctic ship evacuated
 
Tanzania surgery mix-up man dies
 
Death-cheating cat dubbed bionic
 
Day in pictures
 
Most popular now, in detail
 
 
 
 
FEATURES, VIEWS, ANALYSIS  Shock to system
 
Rape case adds to notoriety of Brazilian prison regime
 
  Black day
 
Zimbabwe rhino killings put breeding project in jeopardy
 
  Day in pictures
 
Some of the most striking images from around the world
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
PRODUCTS & SERVICESE-mail news Mobiles Alerts News feeds Podcasts
 
BBC Copyright NoticeMMVIIMost Popular Now | The most read story in Australasia is: Lebanese presidency ends in chaos Back to top ^^ Help Privacy and cookies policy News sources About the BBC Contact us 
 
 
  HomeNewsSportRadioTVWeatherLanguages
 
   
 
 
UK versionInternational version|About the versions Low graphics|Accessibility help  One-Minute World News
 
 
  News services
 
Your news when you want it
 
 
 
News Front Page
 
 
Africa
 
Americas
 
Asia-Pacific
 
Europe
 
Middle East
 
South Asia
 
UK
 
Business
 
Health
 
Science/Nature
 
Technology
 
Entertainment
 
Also in the news
 
-----------------
 
Video and Audio
 
-----------------
 
Have Your Say
 
In Pictures
 
Country Profiles
 
Special Reports RELATED BBC SITES
 
SPORT
 
WEATHER
 
ON THIS DAY
 
EDITORS' BLOG
 
 
LANGUAGES
 
Arabic
 
Persian
 
Pashto
 
Turkish
 
French
 
More
 
  Last Updated: Friday, 23 November 2007, 22:50 GMT 
 
 
E-mail this to a friend  Printable version 
 
 
Lebanese presidency ends in chaos 
 
 
Mr Lahoud left office refusing to recognise the PM's government
 
The term of Lebanon's president has ended with no elected successor and a bitter dispute over who is in power.
 
Before pro-Syrian President Emile Lahoud left the presidential palace at midnight (2200 GMT) he issued an order that the army should take over control.
 
 
But pro-Western PM Fouad Siniora rejected the move and says that under the constitution he and his cabinet are in temporary power.
 
 
The latest in a series of attempts to find a new president failed on Friday.
 
 
The president is elected by parliament, but a vote was scuppered after the pro-Syrian opposition did not allow the necessary quorum to be achieved. A new vote has been scheduled for 30 November.
 
 
KEY STEPS
 
Vote scheduled 1300 (1100 GMT) Friday but not held. Speaker sets vote for 30 November
 
President Emile Lahoud's term expires 0000 Saturday
 
If the presidency become vacant, constitution says presidential powers passed to PM Fouad Siniora
 
 
 
Views from Beirut
 
Send us your comments 
 
 
Mr Lahoud refused to recognise Mr Siniora's government and analysts say his security move was effectively a call for a state of emergency.
 
 
The US has urged all parties to remain calm and said that under the constitution the Lebanese cabinet should "temporarily assume executive powers and responsibilities until a new president is elected".
 
 
Shortly before midnight, Mr Lahoud, 71, walked out of the Baabda presidential palace as the national anthem played, ending nine years in office.
 
 
AFP news agency quoted him as telling reporters: "If they do not elect a new consensual president, with the required two-thirds majority, we have men who can stand up."
 
 
The BBC's Kim Ghattas in Beirut says that opponents of Mr Lahoud have been celebrating the departure of man they see as the last remnant of Syrian influence over the country.
 
 
She says the country appears to be in the ultimate political limbo, with the rival parties even in disagreement over whether a state of emergency exists.
 
 
'Not valid'
 
 
A few hours before his term was due to end, Mr Lahoud issued a statement via a spokesman, Rafiq Shalala.
 
 
It said the army would have responsibility for maintaining order throughout the country.
 
 
 
Mr Siniora says he should take over temporarily under the constitution
 
 
"There are conditions and risks on the ground that could lead to a state of emergency," Mr Shalala said.
 
 
However, constitutionally Mr Lahoud could not call for a state of emergency without the backing of the government he did not recognise.
 
 
Mr Shalala said the army would "submit the measures it takes to the cabinet once there is one that is constitutional".
 
 
A spokesman for Mr Siniora told AFP news agency: "The statement issued by the general directorate of the president of the republic is not valid and is unconstitutional. It is as if the statement was never issued."
 
 
The head of the army has refused to comment. Gen Michel Suleiman was appointed by Mr Lahoud but has largely sought to keep the military neutral.
 
 
Our correspondent says there are reports that he has agreed to follow the cabinet's orders but that the situation may become clearer in the morning.
 
 
However, she says the one thing everyone does agrees on, at least for now, is that they do not want a return to violence.
 
 
Tension on streets
 
 
The election of a president requires a two-thirds majority, which means that the pro-Western ruling bloc - with only a slim majority - could not force its preferred candidate through parliament.
 
 
The tension was palpable on the streets as the crisis over electing the president came to a head, with the army deployed in force and schools closed, our correspondent says.
 
 
Checkpoints were set up and the ministry of interior suspended all firearm permits until further notice.
 
 
The crisis has raised fears of civil strife, including the possibility of rival administrations.
 
 
The issue has turned into a regional and international affair.
 
 
The US, Russia, Syria and Iran have all been intensely involved and there has been a lot of diplomatic shuttling between Damascus, Moscow, Tehran and Paris ahead of the end of Mr Lahoud's term.
 
 
 
 
E-mail this to a friend  Printable version 
 
 
Bookmark with:
 
Delicious Digg reddit Facebook StumbleUpon
 
What are these?
 
  VIDEO AND AUDIO NEWS
 
Troops on the streets amid fears of unrest
 
 
 
 
 
LEBANON POLITICAL CRISIS
 
 
 
KEY STORIES
 
Lebanese presidency ends in chaos
 
Lebanese fail to elect president
 
Lebanon president deadline looms
 
France decries Lebanon 'blockage'
 
 
 
BACKGROUND AND ANALYSIS
 
  Lebanon impasse
 
Rival factions are unable to come to an agreement on a new president.
 
 
Beirut diary: 12 November
 
Lebanon vote in balance
 
The Lebanese crisis explained
 
 
 
PROFILES
 
Who are the Maronites?
 
Profile: Fouad Siniora
 
Profile: Sheikh Hassan Nasrallah
 
Quick guide: Hezbollah
 
 
 
 
 
RELATED INTERNET LINKS
 
Lebanese presidency
 
Syria Gate (official site)
 
The BBC is not responsible for the content of external internet sites
 
 
 
TOP MIDDLE EAST STORIES
 
Lebanese presidency ends in chaos
 
 
Saudis to attend Mid-East summit
 
 
Israeli 'tried to spy for Iran'
 
 
| News feeds
 
 
 
MOST POPULAR STORIES NOW
 
MOST E-MAILED MOST READ Africa in pictures: 10-16 June
 
Many flee from Philippines storm
 
Chocolate lorry goes to Timbuktu
 
Australians vote to choose leader
 
Death-cheating cat dubbed bionic
 
Most popular now, in detail MOST E-MAILED MOST READ Lebanese presidency ends in chaos
 
Stricken Antarctic ship evacuated
 
Tanzania surgery mix-up man dies
 
Death-cheating cat dubbed bionic
 
Day in pictures
 
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Rape case adds to notoriety of Brazilian prison regime
 
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  Last Updated: Friday, 23 November 2007, 22:50 GMT 
 
 
E-mail this to a friend  Printable version 
 
 
Lebanese presidency ends in chaos 
 
 
Mr Lahoud left office refusing to recognise the PM's government
 
The term of Lebanon's president has ended with no elected successor and a bitter dispute over who is in power.
 
Before pro-Syrian President Emile Lahoud left the presidential palace at midnight (2200 GMT) he issued an order that the army should take over control.
 
 
But pro-Western PM Fouad Siniora rejected the move and says that under the constitution he and his cabinet are in temporary power.
 
 
The latest in a series of attempts to find a new president failed on Friday.
 
 
The president is elected by parliament, but a vote was scuppered after the pro-Syrian opposition did not allow the necessary quorum to be achieved. A new vote has been scheduled for 30 November.
 
 
KEY STEPS
 
Vote scheduled 1300 (1100 GMT) Friday but not held. Speaker sets vote for 30 November
 
President Emile Lahoud's term expires 0000 Saturday
 
If the presidency become vacant, constitution says presidential powers passed to PM Fouad Siniora
 
 
 
Views from Beirut
 
Send us your comments 
 
 
Mr Lahoud refused to recognise Mr Siniora's government and analysts say his security move was effectively a call for a state of emergency.
 
 
The US has urged all parties to remain calm and said that under the constitution the Lebanese cabinet should "temporarily assume executive powers and responsibilities until a new president is elected".
 
 
Shortly before midnight, Mr Lahoud, 71, walked out of the Baabda presidential palace as the national anthem played, ending nine years in office.
 
 
AFP news agency quoted him as telling reporters: "If they do not elect a new consensual president, with the required two-thirds majority, we have men who can stand up."
 
 
The BBC's Kim Ghattas in Beirut says that opponents of Mr Lahoud have been celebrating the departure of man they see as the last remnant of Syrian influence over the country.
 
 
She says the country appears to be in the ultimate political limbo, with the rival parties even in disagreement over whether a state of emergency exists.
 
 
'Not valid'
 
 
A few hours before his term was due to end, Mr Lahoud issued a statement via a spokesman, Rafiq Shalala.
 
 
It said the army would have responsibility for maintaining order throughout the country.
 
 
 
Mr Siniora says he should take over temporarily under the constitution
 
 
"There are conditions and risks on the ground that could lead to a state of emergency," Mr Shalala said.
 
 
However, constitutionally Mr Lahoud could not call for a state of emergency without the backing of the government he did not recognise.
 
 
Mr Shalala said the army would "submit the measures it takes to the cabinet once there is one that is constitutional".
 
 
A spokesman for Mr Siniora told AFP news agency: "The statement issued by the general directorate of the president of the republic is not valid and is unconstitutional. It is as if the statement was never issued."
 
 
The head of the army has refused to comment. Gen Michel Suleiman was appointed by Mr Lahoud but has largely sought to keep the military neutral.
 
 
Our correspondent says there are reports that he has agreed to follow the cabinet's orders but that the situation may become clearer in the morning.
 
 
However, she says the one thing everyone does agrees on, at least for now, is that they do not want a return to violence.
 
 
Tension on streets
 
 
The election of a president requires a two-thirds majority, which means that the pro-Western ruling bloc - with only a slim majority - could not force its preferred candidate through parliament.
 
 
The tension was palpable on the streets as the crisis over electing the president came to a head, with the army deployed in force and schools closed, our correspondent says.
 
 
Checkpoints were set up and the ministry of interior suspended all firearm permits until further notice.
 
 
The crisis has raised fears of civil strife, including the possibility of rival administrations.
 
 
The issue has turned into a regional and international affair.
 
 
The US, Russia, Syria and Iran have all been intensely involved and there has been a lot of diplomatic shuttling between Damascus, Moscow, Tehran and Paris ahead of the end of Mr Lahoud's term.
 
 
 
 
E-mail this to a friend  Printable version 
 
 
Bookmark with:
 
Delicious Digg reddit Facebook StumbleUpon
 
What are these?
 
  VIDEO AND AUDIO NEWS
 
Troops on the streets amid fears of unrest
 
 
 
 
 
LEBANON POLITICAL CRISIS
 
 
 
KEY STORIES
 
Lebanese presidency ends in chaos
 
Lebanese fail to elect president
 
Lebanon president deadline looms
 
France decries Lebanon 'blockage'
 
 
 
BACKGROUND AND ANALYSIS
 
  Lebanon impasse
 
Rival factions are unable to come to an agreement on a new president.
 
 
Beirut diary: 12 November
 
Lebanon vote in balance
 
The Lebanese crisis explained
 
 
 
PROFILES
 
Who are the Maronites?
 
Profile: Fouad Siniora
 
Profile: Sheikh Hassan Nasrallah
 
Quick guide: Hezbollah
 
 
 
 
 
RELATED INTERNET LINKS
 
Lebanese presidency
 
Syria Gate (official site)
 
The BBC is not responsible for the content of external internet sites
 
 
 
TOP MIDDLE EAST STORIES
 
Lebanese presidency ends in chaos
 
 
Saudis to attend Mid-East summit
 
 
Israeli 'tried to spy for Iran'
 
 
| News feeds
 
 
 
MOST POPULAR STORIES NOW
 
MOST E-MAILED MOST READ Africa in pictures: 10-16 June
 
Many flee from Philippines storm
 
Chocolate lorry goes to Timbuktu
 
Australians vote to choose leader
 
Death-cheating cat dubbed bionic
 
Most popular now, in detail MOST E-MAILED MOST READ Lebanese presidency ends in chaos
 
Stricken Antarctic ship evacuated
 
Tanzania surgery mix-up man dies
 
Death-cheating cat dubbed bionic
 
Day in pictures
 
Most popular now, in detail
 
 
 
 
FEATURES, VIEWS, ANALYSIS  Shock to system
 
Rape case adds to notoriety of Brazilian prison regime
 
  Black day
 
Zimbabwe rhino killings put breeding project in jeopardy
 
  Day in pictures
 
Some of the most striking images from around the world
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
PRODUCTS & SERVICESE-mail news Mobiles Alerts News feeds Podcasts
 
BBC Copyright NoticeMMVIIMost Popular Now | The most read story in Australasia is: Lebanese presidency ends in chaos Back to top ^^ Help Privacy and cookies policy News sources About the BBC Contact us 
 
 
 
== Ciutats ==
 
* [[Chanthaburi|Chanthaburi]]
 
* [[Chonburi|Chonburi]]
 
* [[Pattaya]]
 
* [[Prachinburi|Prachinburi]]
 
* [[Rayong|Rayong]]
 
* [[Si Racha]]
 
* [[Trat]]
 
* [[Chanthaburi]]
 
 
== Altres destins ==
 
 
== Comprendre ==
 
 
== Arribar-hi ==
 
 
== Circular ==
 
 
== Parlar ==
 
 
== Comprar ==
 
 
== Menjar ==
 
 
== Beure i sortir ==
 
 
== Dormir ==
 
 
== Aprendre ==
 
 
== Treballar ==
 
 
== Seguretat ==
 
 
== Salut ==
 
 
== Respectar ==
 
 
== Mantenir contacte ==
 
 
== Anar-se'n ==
 
{{IsIn|Tailàndia}}
 
L''''este''' és una regió de [[Tailàndia]].
 
 
== Províncias ==
 
* [[Chachoengsao_(província)|Chachoengsao]]
 
* [[Chanthaburi_(província)|Chanthaburi]]
 
* [[Chonburi_(província)|Chonburi]]
 
* [[Prachinburi_(província)|Prachinburi]]
 
* [[Rayong_(província)|Rayong]]
 
* [[Sa Kaew_(província)|Sa Kaew]]
 
* [[Trat_(província)|Trat]]
 
  HomeNewsSportRadioTVWeatherLanguages
 
   
 
 
UK versionInternational version|About the versions Low graphics|Accessibility help  One-Minute World News
 
 
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Your news when you want it
 
 
 
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Health
 
Science/Nature
 
Technology
 
Entertainment
 
Also in the news
 
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Have Your Say
 
In Pictures
 
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Special Reports RELATED BBC SITES
 
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More
 
  Last Updated: Friday, 23 November 2007, 22:50 GMT 
 
 
E-mail this to a friend  Printable version 
 
 
Lebanese presidency ends in chaos 
 
 
Mr Lahoud left office refusing to recognise the PM's government
 
The term of Lebanon's president has ended with no elected successor and a bitter dispute over who is in power.
 
Before pro-Syrian President Emile Lahoud left the presidential palace at midnight (2200 GMT) he issued an order that the army should take over control.
 
 
But pro-Western PM Fouad Siniora rejected the move and says that under the constitution he and his cabinet are in temporary power.
 
 
The latest in a series of attempts to find a new president failed on Friday.
 
 
The president is elected by parliament, but a vote was scuppered after the pro-Syrian opposition did not allow the necessary quorum to be achieved. A new vote has been scheduled for 30 November.
 
 
KEY STEPS
 
Vote scheduled 1300 (1100 GMT) Friday but not held. Speaker sets vote for 30 November
 
President Emile Lahoud's term expires 0000 Saturday
 
If the presidency become vacant, constitution says presidential powers passed to PM Fouad Siniora
 
 
 
Views from Beirut
 
Send us your comments 
 
 
Mr Lahoud refused to recognise Mr Siniora's government and analysts say his security move was effectively a call for a state of emergency.
 
 
The US has urged all parties to remain calm and said that under the constitution the Lebanese cabinet should "temporarily assume executive powers and responsibilities until a new president is elected".
 
 
Shortly before midnight, Mr Lahoud, 71, walked out of the Baabda presidential palace as the national anthem played, ending nine years in office.
 
 
AFP news agency quoted him as telling reporters: "If they do not elect a new consensual president, with the required two-thirds majority, we have men who can stand up."
 
 
The BBC's Kim Ghattas in Beirut says that opponents of Mr Lahoud have been celebrating the departure of man they see as the last remnant of Syrian influence over the country.
 
 
She says the country appears to be in the ultimate political limbo, with the rival parties even in disagreement over whether a state of emergency exists.
 
 
'Not valid'
 
 
A few hours before his term was due to end, Mr Lahoud issued a statement via a spokesman, Rafiq Shalala.
 
 
It said the army would have responsibility for maintaining order throughout the country.
 
 
 
Mr Siniora says he should take over temporarily under the constitution
 
 
"There are conditions and risks on the ground that could lead to a state of emergency," Mr Shalala said.
 
 
However, constitutionally Mr Lahoud could not call for a state of emergency without the backing of the government he did not recognise.
 
 
Mr Shalala said the army would "submit the measures it takes to the cabinet once there is one that is constitutional".
 
 
A spokesman for Mr Siniora told AFP news agency: "The statement issued by the general directorate of the president of the republic is not valid and is unconstitutional. It is as if the statement was never issued."
 
 
The head of the army has refused to comment. Gen Michel Suleiman was appointed by Mr Lahoud but has largely sought to keep the military neutral.
 
 
Our correspondent says there are reports that he has agreed to follow the cabinet's orders but that the situation may become clearer in the morning.
 
 
However, she says the one thing everyone does agrees on, at least for now, is that they do not want a return to violence.
 
 
Tension on streets
 
 
The election of a president requires a two-thirds majority, which means that the pro-Western ruling bloc - with only a slim majority - could not force its preferred candidate through parliament.
 
 
The tension was palpable on the streets as the crisis over electing the president came to a head, with the army deployed in force and schools closed, our correspondent says.
 
 
Checkpoints were set up and the ministry of interior suspended all firearm permits until further notice.
 
 
The crisis has raised fears of civil strife, including the possibility of rival administrations.
 
 
The issue has turned into a regional and international affair.
 
 
The US, Russia, Syria and Iran have all been intensely involved and there has been a lot of diplomatic shuttling between Damascus, Moscow, Tehran and Paris ahead of the end of Mr Lahoud's term.
 
 
 
 
E-mail this to a friend  Printable version 
 
 
Bookmark with:
 
Delicious Digg reddit Facebook StumbleUpon
 
What are these?
 
  VIDEO AND AUDIO NEWS
 
Troops on the streets amid fears of unrest
 
 
 
 
 
LEBANON POLITICAL CRISIS
 
 
 
KEY STORIES
 
Lebanese presidency ends in chaos
 
Lebanese fail to elect president
 
Lebanon president deadline looms
 
France decries Lebanon 'blockage'
 
 
 
BACKGROUND AND ANALYSIS
 
  Lebanon impasse
 
Rival factions are unable to come to an agreement on a new president.
 
 
Beirut diary: 12 November
 
Lebanon vote in balance
 
The Lebanese crisis explained
 
 
 
PROFILES
 
Who are the Maronites?
 
Profile: Fouad Siniora
 
Profile: Sheikh Hassan Nasrallah
 
Quick guide: Hezbollah
 
 
 
 
 
RELATED INTERNET LINKS
 
Lebanese presidency
 
Syria Gate (official site)
 
The BBC is not responsible for the content of external internet sites
 
 
 
TOP MIDDLE EAST STORIES
 
Lebanese presidency ends in chaos
 
 
Saudis to attend Mid-East summit
 
 
Israeli 'tried to spy for Iran'
 
 
| News feeds
 
 
 
MOST POPULAR STORIES NOW
 
MOST E-MAILED MOST READ Africa in pictures: 10-16 June
 
Many flee from Philippines storm
 
Chocolate lorry goes to Timbuktu
 
Australians vote to choose leader
 
Death-cheating cat dubbed bionic
 
Most popular now, in detail MOST E-MAILED MOST READ Lebanese presidency ends in chaos
 
Stricken Antarctic ship evacuated
 
Tanzania surgery mix-up man dies
 
Death-cheating cat dubbed bionic
 
Day in pictures
 
Most popular now, in detail
 
 
 
 
FEATURES, VIEWS, ANALYSIS  Shock to system
 
Rape case adds to notoriety of Brazilian prison regime
 
  Black day
 
Zimbabwe rhino killings put breeding project in jeopardy
 
  Day in pictures
 
Some of the most striking images from around the world
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
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BBC Copyright NoticeMMVIIMost Popular Now | The most read story in Australasia is: Lebanese presidency ends in chaos Back to top ^^ Help Privacy and cookies policy News sources About the BBC Contact us 
 
 
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Business
 
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Also in the news
 
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Have Your Say
 
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More
 
  Last Updated: Friday, 23 November 2007, 22:50 GMT 
 
 
E-mail this to a friend  Printable version 
 
 
Lebanese presidency ends in chaos 
 
 
Mr Lahoud left office refusing to recognise the PM's government
 
The term of Lebanon's president has ended with no elected successor and a bitter dispute over who is in power.
 
Before pro-Syrian President Emile Lahoud left the presidential palace at midnight (2200 GMT) he issued an order that the army should take over control.
 
 
But pro-Western PM Fouad Siniora rejected the move and says that under the constitution he and his cabinet are in temporary power.
 
 
The latest in a series of attempts to find a new president failed on Friday.
 
 
The president is elected by parliament, but a vote was scuppered after the pro-Syrian opposition did not allow the necessary quorum to be achieved. A new vote has been scheduled for 30 November.
 
 
KEY STEPS
 
Vote scheduled 1300 (1100 GMT) Friday but not held. Speaker sets vote for 30 November
 
President Emile Lahoud's term expires 0000 Saturday
 
If the presidency become vacant, constitution says presidential powers passed to PM Fouad Siniora
 
 
 
Views from Beirut
 
Send us your comments 
 
 
Mr Lahoud refused to recognise Mr Siniora's government and analysts say his security move was effectively a call for a state of emergency.
 
 
The US has urged all parties to remain calm and said that under the constitution the Lebanese cabinet should "temporarily assume executive powers and responsibilities until a new president is elected".
 
 
Shortly before midnight, Mr Lahoud, 71, walked out of the Baabda presidential palace as the national anthem played, ending nine years in office.
 
 
AFP news agency quoted him as telling reporters: "If they do not elect a new consensual president, with the required two-thirds majority, we have men who can stand up."
 
 
The BBC's Kim Ghattas in Beirut says that opponents of Mr Lahoud have been celebrating the departure of man they see as the last remnant of Syrian influence over the country.
 
 
She says the country appears to be in the ultimate political limbo, with the rival parties even in disagreement over whether a state of emergency exists.
 
 
'Not valid'
 
 
A few hours before his term was due to end, Mr Lahoud issued a statement via a spokesman, Rafiq Shalala.
 
 
It said the army would have responsibility for maintaining order throughout the country.
 
 
 
Mr Siniora says he should take over temporarily under the constitution
 
 
"There are conditions and risks on the ground that could lead to a state of emergency," Mr Shalala said.
 
 
However, constitutionally Mr Lahoud could not call for a state of emergency without the backing of the government he did not recognise.
 
 
Mr Shalala said the army would "submit the measures it takes to the cabinet once there is one that is constitutional".
 
 
A spokesman for Mr Siniora told AFP news agency: "The statement issued by the general directorate of the president of the republic is not valid and is unconstitutional. It is as if the statement was never issued."
 
 
The head of the army has refused to comment. Gen Michel Suleiman was appointed by Mr Lahoud but has largely sought to keep the military neutral.
 
 
Our correspondent says there are reports that he has agreed to follow the cabinet's orders but that the situation may become clearer in the morning.
 
 
However, she says the one thing everyone does agrees on, at least for now, is that they do not want a return to violence.
 
 
Tension on streets
 
 
The election of a president requires a two-thirds majority, which means that the pro-Western ruling bloc - with only a slim majority - could not force its preferred candidate through parliament.
 
 
The tension was palpable on the streets as the crisis over electing the president came to a head, with the army deployed in force and schools closed, our correspondent says.
 
 
Checkpoints were set up and the ministry of interior suspended all firearm permits until further notice.
 
 
The crisis has raised fears of civil strife, including the possibility of rival administrations.
 
 
The issue has turned into a regional and international affair.
 
 
The US, Russia, Syria and Iran have all been intensely involved and there has been a lot of diplomatic shuttling between Damascus, Moscow, Tehran and Paris ahead of the end of Mr Lahoud's term.
 
 
 
 
E-mail this to a friend  Printable version 
 
 
Bookmark with:
 
Delicious Digg reddit Facebook StumbleUpon
 
What are these?
 
  VIDEO AND AUDIO NEWS
 
Troops on the streets amid fears of unrest
 
 
 
 
 
LEBANON POLITICAL CRISIS
 
 
 
KEY STORIES
 
Lebanese presidency ends in chaos
 
Lebanese fail to elect president
 
Lebanon president deadline looms
 
France decries Lebanon 'blockage'
 
 
 
BACKGROUND AND ANALYSIS
 
  Lebanon impasse
 
Rival factions are unable to come to an agreement on a new president.
 
 
Beirut diary: 12 November
 
Lebanon vote in balance
 
The Lebanese crisis explained
 
 
 
PROFILES
 
Who are the Maronites?
 
Profile: Fouad Siniora
 
Profile: Sheikh Hassan Nasrallah
 
Quick guide: Hezbollah
 
 
 
 
 
RELATED INTERNET LINKS
 
Lebanese presidency
 
Syria Gate (official site)
 
The BBC is not responsible for the content of external internet sites
 
 
 
TOP MIDDLE EAST STORIES
 
Lebanese presidency ends in chaos
 
 
Saudis to attend Mid-East summit
 
 
Israeli 'tried to spy for Iran'
 
 
| News feeds
 
 
 
MOST POPULAR STORIES NOW
 
MOST E-MAILED MOST READ Africa in pictures: 10-16 June
 
Many flee from Philippines storm
 
Chocolate lorry goes to Timbuktu
 
Australians vote to choose leader
 
Death-cheating cat dubbed bionic
 
Most popular now, in detail MOST E-MAILED MOST READ Lebanese presidency ends in chaos
 
Stricken Antarctic ship evacuated
 
Tanzania surgery mix-up man dies
 
Death-cheating cat dubbed bionic
 
Day in pictures
 
Most popular now, in detail
 
 
 
 
FEATURES, VIEWS, ANALYSIS  Shock to system
 
Rape case adds to notoriety of Brazilian prison regime
 
  Black day
 
Zimbabwe rhino killings put breeding project in jeopardy
 
  Day in pictures
 
Some of the most striking images from around the world
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
PRODUCTS & SERVICESE-mail news Mobiles Alerts News feeds Podcasts
 
BBC Copyright NoticeMMVIIMost Popular Now | The most read story in Australasia is: Lebanese presidency ends in chaos Back to top ^^ Help Privacy and cookies policy News sources About the BBC Contact us 
 
 
  HomeNewsSportRadioTVWeatherLanguages
 
   
 
 
UK versionInternational version|About the versions Low graphics|Accessibility help  One-Minute World News
 
 
  News services
 
Your news when you want it
 
 
 
News Front Page
 
 
Africa
 
Americas
 
Asia-Pacific
 
Europe
 
Middle East
 
South Asia
 
UK
 
Business
 
Health
 
Science/Nature
 
Technology
 
Entertainment
 
Also in the news
 
-----------------
 
Video and Audio
 
-----------------
 
Have Your Say
 
In Pictures
 
Country Profiles
 
Special Reports RELATED BBC SITES
 
SPORT
 
WEATHER
 
ON THIS DAY
 
EDITORS' BLOG
 
 
LANGUAGES
 
Arabic
 
Persian
 
Pashto
 
Turkish
 
French
 
More
 
  Last Updated: Friday, 23 November 2007, 22:50 GMT 
 
 
E-mail this to a friend  Printable version 
 
 
Lebanese presidency ends in chaos 
 
 
Mr Lahoud left office refusing to recognise the PM's government
 
The term of Lebanon's president has ended with no elected successor and a bitter dispute over who is in power.
 
Before pro-Syrian President Emile Lahoud left the presidential palace at midnight (2200 GMT) he issued an order that the army should take over control.
 
 
But pro-Western PM Fouad Siniora rejected the move and says that under the constitution he and his cabinet are in temporary power.
 
 
The latest in a series of attempts to find a new president failed on Friday.
 
 
The president is elected by parliament, but a vote was scuppered after the pro-Syrian opposition did not allow the necessary quorum to be achieved. A new vote has been scheduled for 30 November.
 
 
KEY STEPS
 
Vote scheduled 1300 (1100 GMT) Friday but not held. Speaker sets vote for 30 November
 
President Emile Lahoud's term expires 0000 Saturday
 
If the presidency become vacant, constitution says presidential powers passed to PM Fouad Siniora
 
 
 
Views from Beirut
 
Send us your comments 
 
 
Mr Lahoud refused to recognise Mr Siniora's government and analysts say his security move was effectively a call for a state of emergency.
 
 
The US has urged all parties to remain calm and said that under the constitution the Lebanese cabinet should "temporarily assume executive powers and responsibilities until a new president is elected".
 
 
Shortly before midnight, Mr Lahoud, 71, walked out of the Baabda presidential palace as the national anthem played, ending nine years in office.
 
 
AFP news agency quoted him as telling reporters: "If they do not elect a new consensual president, with the required two-thirds majority, we have men who can stand up."
 
 
The BBC's Kim Ghattas in Beirut says that opponents of Mr Lahoud have been celebrating the departure of man they see as the last remnant of Syrian influence over the country.
 
 
She says the country appears to be in the ultimate political limbo, with the rival parties even in disagreement over whether a state of emergency exists.
 
 
'Not valid'
 
 
A few hours before his term was due to end, Mr Lahoud issued a statement via a spokesman, Rafiq Shalala.
 
 
It said the army would have responsibility for maintaining order throughout the country.
 
 
 
Mr Siniora says he should take over temporarily under the constitution
 
 
"There are conditions and risks on the ground that could lead to a state of emergency," Mr Shalala said.
 
 
However, constitutionally Mr Lahoud could not call for a state of emergency without the backing of the government he did not recognise.
 
 
Mr Shalala said the army would "submit the measures it takes to the cabinet once there is one that is constitutional".
 
 
A spokesman for Mr Siniora told AFP news agency: "The statement issued by the general directorate of the president of the republic is not valid and is unconstitutional. It is as if the statement was never issued."
 
 
The head of the army has refused to comment. Gen Michel Suleiman was appointed by Mr Lahoud but has largely sought to keep the military neutral.
 
 
Our correspondent says there are reports that he has agreed to follow the cabinet's orders but that the situation may become clearer in the morning.
 
 
However, she says the one thing everyone does agrees on, at least for now, is that they do not want a return to violence.
 
 
Tension on streets
 
 
The election of a president requires a two-thirds majority, which means that the pro-Western ruling bloc - with only a slim majority - could not force its preferred candidate through parliament.
 
 
The tension was palpable on the streets as the crisis over electing the president came to a head, with the army deployed in force and schools closed, our correspondent says.
 
 
Checkpoints were set up and the ministry of interior suspended all firearm permits until further notice.
 
 
The crisis has raised fears of civil strife, including the possibility of rival administrations.
 
 
The issue has turned into a regional and international affair.
 
 
The US, Russia, Syria and Iran have all been intensely involved and there has been a lot of diplomatic shuttling between Damascus, Moscow, Tehran and Paris ahead of the end of Mr Lahoud's term.
 
 
 
 
E-mail this to a friend  Printable version 
 
 
Bookmark with:
 
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What are these?
 
  VIDEO AND AUDIO NEWS
 
Troops on the streets amid fears of unrest
 
 
 
 
 
LEBANON POLITICAL CRISIS
 
 
 
KEY STORIES
 
Lebanese presidency ends in chaos
 
Lebanese fail to elect president
 
Lebanon president deadline looms
 
France decries Lebanon 'blockage'
 
 
 
BACKGROUND AND ANALYSIS
 
  Lebanon impasse
 
Rival factions are unable to come to an agreement on a new president.
 
 
Beirut diary: 12 November
 
Lebanon vote in balance
 
The Lebanese crisis explained
 
 
 
PROFILES
 
Who are the Maronites?
 
Profile: Fouad Siniora
 
Profile: Sheikh Hassan Nasrallah
 
Quick guide: Hezbollah
 
 
 
 
 
RELATED INTERNET LINKS
 
Lebanese presidency
 
Syria Gate (official site)
 
The BBC is not responsible for the content of external internet sites
 
 
 
TOP MIDDLE EAST STORIES
 
Lebanese presidency ends in chaos
 
 
Saudis to attend Mid-East summit
 
 
Israeli 'tried to spy for Iran'
 
 
| News feeds
 
 
 
MOST POPULAR STORIES NOW
 
MOST E-MAILED MOST READ Africa in pictures: 10-16 June
 
Many flee from Philippines storm
 
Chocolate lorry goes to Timbuktu
 
Australians vote to choose leader
 
Death-cheating cat dubbed bionic
 
Most popular now, in detail MOST E-MAILED MOST READ Lebanese presidency ends in chaos
 
Stricken Antarctic ship evacuated
 
Tanzania surgery mix-up man dies
 
Death-cheating cat dubbed bionic
 
Day in pictures
 
Most popular now, in detail
 
 
 
 
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  Last Updated: Friday, 23 November 2007, 22:50 GMT 
 
 
E-mail this to a friend  Printable version 
 
 
Lebanese presidency ends in chaos 
 
 
Mr Lahoud left office refusing to recognise the PM's government
 
The term of Lebanon's president has ended with no elected successor and a bitter dispute over who is in power.
 
Before pro-Syrian President Emile Lahoud left the presidential palace at midnight (2200 GMT) he issued an order that the army should take over control.
 
 
But pro-Western PM Fouad Siniora rejected the move and says that under the constitution he and his cabinet are in temporary power.
 
 
The latest in a series of attempts to find a new president failed on Friday.
 
 
The president is elected by parliament, but a vote was scuppered after the pro-Syrian opposition did not allow the necessary quorum to be achieved. A new vote has been scheduled for 30 November.
 
 
KEY STEPS
 
Vote scheduled 1300 (1100 GMT) Friday but not held. Speaker sets vote for 30 November
 
President Emile Lahoud's term expires 0000 Saturday
 
If the presidency become vacant, constitution says presidential powers passed to PM Fouad Siniora
 
 
 
Views from Beirut
 
Send us your comments 
 
 
Mr Lahoud refused to recognise Mr Siniora's government and analysts say his security move was effectively a call for a state of emergency.
 
 
The US has urged all parties to remain calm and said that under the constitution the Lebanese cabinet should "temporarily assume executive powers and responsibilities until a new president is elected".
 
 
Shortly before midnight, Mr Lahoud, 71, walked out of the Baabda presidential palace as the national anthem played, ending nine years in office.
 
 
AFP news agency quoted him as telling reporters: "If they do not elect a new consensual president, with the required two-thirds majority, we have men who can stand up."
 
 
The BBC's Kim Ghattas in Beirut says that opponents of Mr Lahoud have been celebrating the departure of man they see as the last remnant of Syrian influence over the country.
 
 
She says the country appears to be in the ultimate political limbo, with the rival parties even in disagreement over whether a state of emergency exists.
 
 
'Not valid'
 
 
A few hours before his term was due to end, Mr Lahoud issued a statement via a spokesman, Rafiq Shalala.
 
 
It said the army would have responsibility for maintaining order throughout the country.
 
 
 
Mr Siniora says he should take over temporarily under the constitution
 
 
"There are conditions and risks on the ground that could lead to a state of emergency," Mr Shalala said.
 
 
However, constitutionally Mr Lahoud could not call for a state of emergency without the backing of the government he did not recognise.
 
 
Mr Shalala said the army would "submit the measures it takes to the cabinet once there is one that is constitutional".
 
 
A spokesman for Mr Siniora told AFP news agency: "The statement issued by the general directorate of the president of the republic is not valid and is unconstitutional. It is as if the statement was never issued."
 
 
The head of the army has refused to comment. Gen Michel Suleiman was appointed by Mr Lahoud but has largely sought to keep the military neutral.
 
 
Our correspondent says there are reports that he has agreed to follow the cabinet's orders but that the situation may become clearer in the morning.
 
 
However, she says the one thing everyone does agrees on, at least for now, is that they do not want a return to violence.
 
 
Tension on streets
 
 
The election of a president requires a two-thirds majority, which means that the pro-Western ruling bloc - with only a slim majority - could not force its preferred candidate through parliament.
 
 
The tension was palpable on the streets as the crisis over electing the president came to a head, with the army deployed in force and schools closed, our correspondent says.
 
 
Checkpoints were set up and the ministry of interior suspended all firearm permits until further notice.
 
 
The crisis has raised fears of civil strife, including the possibility of rival administrations.
 
 
The issue has turned into a regional and international affair.
 
 
The US, Russia, Syria and Iran have all been intensely involved and there has been a lot of diplomatic shuttling between Damascus, Moscow, Tehran and Paris ahead of the end of Mr Lahoud's term.
 
 
 
 
E-mail this to a friend  Printable version 
 
 
Bookmark with:
 
Delicious Digg reddit Facebook StumbleUpon
 
What are these?
 
  VIDEO AND AUDIO NEWS
 
Troops on the streets amid fears of unrest
 
 
 
 
 
LEBANON POLITICAL CRISIS
 
 
 
KEY STORIES
 
Lebanese presidency ends in chaos
 
Lebanese fail to elect president
 
Lebanon president deadline looms
 
France decries Lebanon 'blockage'
 
 
 
BACKGROUND AND ANALYSIS
 
  Lebanon impasse
 
Rival factions are unable to come to an agreement on a new president.
 
 
Beirut diary: 12 November
 
Lebanon vote in balance
 
The Lebanese crisis explained
 
 
 
PROFILES
 
Who are the Maronites?
 
Profile: Fouad Siniora
 
Profile: Sheikh Hassan Nasrallah
 
Quick guide: Hezbollah
 
 
 
 
 
RELATED INTERNET LINKS
 
Lebanese presidency
 
Syria Gate (official site)
 
The BBC is not responsible for the content of external internet sites
 
 
 
TOP MIDDLE EAST STORIES
 
Lebanese presidency ends in chaos
 
 
Saudis to attend Mid-East summit
 
 
Israeli 'tried to spy for Iran'
 
 
| News feeds
 
 
 
MOST POPULAR STORIES NOW
 
MOST E-MAILED MOST READ Africa in pictures: 10-16 June
 
Many flee from Philippines storm
 
Chocolate lorry goes to Timbuktu
 
Australians vote to choose leader
 
Death-cheating cat dubbed bionic
 
Most popular now, in detail MOST E-MAILED MOST READ Lebanese presidency ends in chaos
 
Stricken Antarctic ship evacuated
 
Tanzania surgery mix-up man dies
 
Death-cheating cat dubbed bionic
 
Day in pictures
 
Most popular now, in detail
 
 
 
 
FEATURES, VIEWS, ANALYSIS  Shock to system
 
Rape case adds to notoriety of Brazilian prison regime
 
  Black day
 
Zimbabwe rhino killings put breeding project in jeopardy
 
  Day in pictures
 
Some of the most striking images from around the world
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
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BBC Copyright NoticeMMVIIMost Popular Now | The most read story in Australasia is: Lebanese presidency ends in chaos Back to top ^^ Help Privacy and cookies policy News sources About the BBC Contact us 
 
 
  HomeNewsSportRadioTVWeatherLanguages
 
   
 
 
UK versionInternational version|About the versions Low graphics|Accessibility help  One-Minute World News
 
 
  News services
 
Your news when you want it
 
 
 
News Front Page
 
 
Africa
 
Americas
 
Asia-Pacific
 
Europe
 
Middle East
 
South Asia
 
UK
 
Business
 
Health
 
Science/Nature
 
Technology
 
Entertainment
 
Also in the news
 
-----------------
 
Video and Audio
 
-----------------
 
Have Your Say
 
In Pictures
 
Country Profiles
 
Special Reports RELATED BBC SITES
 
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ON THIS DAY
 
EDITORS' BLOG
 
 
LANGUAGES
 
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Pashto
 
Turkish
 
French
 
More
 
  Last Updated: Friday, 23 November 2007, 22:50 GMT 
 
 
E-mail this to a friend  Printable version 
 
 
Lebanese presidency ends in chaos 
 
 
Mr Lahoud left office refusing to recognise the PM's government
 
The term of Lebanon's president has ended with no elected successor and a bitter dispute over who is in power.
 
Before pro-Syrian President Emile Lahoud left the presidential palace at midnight (2200 GMT) he issued an order that the army should take over control.
 
 
But pro-Western PM Fouad Siniora rejected the move and says that under the constitution he and his cabinet are in temporary power.
 
 
The latest in a series of attempts to find a new president failed on Friday.
 
 
The president is elected by parliament, but a vote was scuppered after the pro-Syrian opposition did not allow the necessary quorum to be achieved. A new vote has been scheduled for 30 November.
 
 
KEY STEPS
 
Vote scheduled 1300 (1100 GMT) Friday but not held. Speaker sets vote for 30 November
 
President Emile Lahoud's term expires 0000 Saturday
 
If the presidency become vacant, constitution says presidential powers passed to PM Fouad Siniora
 
 
 
Views from Beirut
 
Send us your comments 
 
 
Mr Lahoud refused to recognise Mr Siniora's government and analysts say his security move was effectively a call for a state of emergency.
 
 
The US has urged all parties to remain calm and said that under the constitution the Lebanese cabinet should "temporarily assume executive powers and responsibilities until a new president is elected".
 
 
Shortly before midnight, Mr Lahoud, 71, walked out of the Baabda presidential palace as the national anthem played, ending nine years in office.
 
 
AFP news agency quoted him as telling reporters: "If they do not elect a new consensual president, with the required two-thirds majority, we have men who can stand up."
 
 
The BBC's Kim Ghattas in Beirut says that opponents of Mr Lahoud have been celebrating the departure of man they see as the last remnant of Syrian influence over the country.
 
 
She says the country appears to be in the ultimate political limbo, with the rival parties even in disagreement over whether a state of emergency exists.
 
 
'Not valid'
 
 
A few hours before his term was due to end, Mr Lahoud issued a statement via a spokesman, Rafiq Shalala.
 
 
It said the army would have responsibility for maintaining order throughout the country.
 
 
 
Mr Siniora says he should take over temporarily under the constitution
 
 
"There are conditions and risks on the ground that could lead to a state of emergency," Mr Shalala said.
 
 
However, constitutionally Mr Lahoud could not call for a state of emergency without the backing of the government he did not recognise.
 
 
Mr Shalala said the army would "submit the measures it takes to the cabinet once there is one that is constitutional".
 
 
A spokesman for Mr Siniora told AFP news agency: "The statement issued by the general directorate of the president of the republic is not valid and is unconstitutional. It is as if the statement was never issued."
 
 
The head of the army has refused to comment. Gen Michel Suleiman was appointed by Mr Lahoud but has largely sought to keep the military neutral.
 
 
Our correspondent says there are reports that he has agreed to follow the cabinet's orders but that the situation may become clearer in the morning.
 
 
However, she says the one thing everyone does agrees on, at least for now, is that they do not want a return to violence.
 
 
Tension on streets
 
 
The election of a president requires a two-thirds majority, which means that the pro-Western ruling bloc - with only a slim majority - could not force its preferred candidate through parliament.
 
 
The tension was palpable on the streets as the crisis over electing the president came to a head, with the army deployed in force and schools closed, our correspondent says.
 
 
Checkpoints were set up and the ministry of interior suspended all firearm permits until further notice.
 
 
The crisis has raised fears of civil strife, including the possibility of rival administrations.
 
 
The issue has turned into a regional and international affair.
 
 
The US, Russia, Syria and Iran have all been intensely involved and there has been a lot of diplomatic shuttling between Damascus, Moscow, Tehran and Paris ahead of the end of Mr Lahoud's term.
 
 
 
 
E-mail this to a friend  Printable version 
 
 
Bookmark with:
 
Delicious Digg reddit Facebook StumbleUpon
 
What are these?
 
  VIDEO AND AUDIO NEWS
 
Troops on the streets amid fears of unrest
 
 
 
 
 
LEBANON POLITICAL CRISIS
 
 
 
KEY STORIES
 
Lebanese presidency ends in chaos
 
Lebanese fail to elect president
 
Lebanon president deadline looms
 
France decries Lebanon 'blockage'
 
 
 
BACKGROUND AND ANALYSIS
 
  Lebanon impasse
 
Rival factions are unable to come to an agreement on a new president.
 
 
Beirut diary: 12 November
 
Lebanon vote in balance
 
The Lebanese crisis explained
 
 
 
PROFILES
 
Who are the Maronites?
 
Profile: Fouad Siniora
 
Profile: Sheikh Hassan Nasrallah
 
Quick guide: Hezbollah
 
 
 
 
 
RELATED INTERNET LINKS
 
Lebanese presidency
 
Syria Gate (official site)
 
The BBC is not responsible for the content of external internet sites
 
 
 
TOP MIDDLE EAST STORIES
 
Lebanese presidency ends in chaos
 
 
Saudis to attend Mid-East summit
 
 
Israeli 'tried to spy for Iran'
 
 
| News feeds
 
 
 
MOST POPULAR STORIES NOW
 
MOST E-MAILED MOST READ Africa in pictures: 10-16 June
 
Many flee from Philippines storm
 
Chocolate lorry goes to Timbuktu
 
Australians vote to choose leader
 
Death-cheating cat dubbed bionic
 
Most popular now, in detail MOST E-MAILED MOST READ Lebanese presidency ends in chaos
 
Stricken Antarctic ship evacuated
 
Tanzania surgery mix-up man dies
 
Death-cheating cat dubbed bionic
 
Day in pictures
 
Most popular now, in detail
 
 
 
 
FEATURES, VIEWS, ANALYSIS  Shock to system
 
Rape case adds to notoriety of Brazilian prison regime
 
  Black day
 
Zimbabwe rhino killings put breeding project in jeopardy
 
  Day in pictures
 
Some of the most striking images from around the world
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
PRODUCTS & SERVICESE-mail news Mobiles Alerts News feeds Podcasts
 
BBC Copyright NoticeMMVIIMost Popular Now | The most read story in Australasia is: Lebanese presidency ends in chaos Back to top ^^ Help Privacy and cookies policy News sources About the BBC Contact us 
 
 
 
== Ciutats ==
 
* [[Chanthaburi|Chanthaburi]]
 
* [[Chonburi|Chonburi]]
 
* [[Pattaya]]
 
* [[Prachinburi|Prachinburi]]
 
* [[Rayong|Rayong]]
 
* [[Si Racha]]
 
* [[Trat]]
 
* [[Chanthaburi]]
 
 
== Altres destins ==
 
 
== Comprendre ==
 
 
== Arribar-hi ==
 
 
== Circular ==
 
 
== Parlar ==
 
 
== Comprar ==
 
 
== Menjar ==
 
 
== Beure i sortir ==
 
 
== Dormir ==
 
 
== Aprendre ==
 
 
== Treballar ==
 
 
== Seguretat ==
 
 
== Salut ==
 
 
== Respectar ==
 
 
== Mantenir contacte ==
 
 
== Anar-se'n ==
 
{{IsIn|Tailàndia}}
 
L''''este''' és una regió de [[Tailàndia]].
 
 
== Províncias ==
 
* [[Chachoengsao_(província)|Chachoengsao]]
 
* [[Chanthaburi_(província)|Chanthaburi]]
 
* [[Chonburi_(província)|Chonburi]]
 
* [[Prachinburi_(província)|Prachinburi]]
 
* [[Rayong_(província)|Rayong]]
 
* [[Sa Kaew_(província)|Sa Kaew]]
 
* [[Trat_(província)|Trat]]
 
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Middle East
 
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Business
 
Health
 
Science/Nature
 
Technology
 
Entertainment
 
Also in the news
 
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Have Your Say
 
In Pictures
 
Country Profiles
 
Special Reports RELATED BBC SITES
 
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More
 
  Last Updated: Friday, 23 November 2007, 22:50 GMT 
 
 
E-mail this to a friend  Printable version 
 
 
Lebanese presidency ends in chaos 
 
 
Mr Lahoud left office refusing to recognise the PM's government
 
The term of Lebanon's president has ended with no elected successor and a bitter dispute over who is in power.
 
Before pro-Syrian President Emile Lahoud left the presidential palace at midnight (2200 GMT) he issued an order that the army should take over control.
 
 
But pro-Western PM Fouad Siniora rejected the move and says that under the constitution he and his cabinet are in temporary power.
 
 
The latest in a series of attempts to find a new president failed on Friday.
 
 
The president is elected by parliament, but a vote was scuppered after the pro-Syrian opposition did not allow the necessary quorum to be achieved. A new vote has been scheduled for 30 November.
 
 
KEY STEPS
 
Vote scheduled 1300 (1100 GMT) Friday but not held. Speaker sets vote for 30 November
 
President Emile Lahoud's term expires 0000 Saturday
 
If the presidency become vacant, constitution says presidential powers passed to PM Fouad Siniora
 
 
 
Views from Beirut
 
Send us your comments 
 
 
Mr Lahoud refused to recognise Mr Siniora's government and analysts say his security move was effectively a call for a state of emergency.
 
 
The US has urged all parties to remain calm and said that under the constitution the Lebanese cabinet should "temporarily assume executive powers and responsibilities until a new president is elected".
 
 
Shortly before midnight, Mr Lahoud, 71, walked out of the Baabda presidential palace as the national anthem played, ending nine years in office.
 
 
AFP news agency quoted him as telling reporters: "If they do not elect a new consensual president, with the required two-thirds majority, we have men who can stand up."
 
 
The BBC's Kim Ghattas in Beirut says that opponents of Mr Lahoud have been celebrating the departure of man they see as the last remnant of Syrian influence over the country.
 
 
She says the country appears to be in the ultimate political limbo, with the rival parties even in disagreement over whether a state of emergency exists.
 
 
'Not valid'
 
 
A few hours before his term was due to end, Mr Lahoud issued a statement via a spokesman, Rafiq Shalala.
 
 
It said the army would have responsibility for maintaining order throughout the country.
 
 
 
Mr Siniora says he should take over temporarily under the constitution
 
 
"There are conditions and risks on the ground that could lead to a state of emergency," Mr Shalala said.
 
 
However, constitutionally Mr Lahoud could not call for a state of emergency without the backing of the government he did not recognise.
 
 
Mr Shalala said the army would "submit the measures it takes to the cabinet once there is one that is constitutional".
 
 
A spokesman for Mr Siniora told AFP news agency: "The statement issued by the general directorate of the president of the republic is not valid and is unconstitutional. It is as if the statement was never issued."
 
 
The head of the army has refused to comment. Gen Michel Suleiman was appointed by Mr Lahoud but has largely sought to keep the military neutral.
 
 
Our correspondent says there are reports that he has agreed to follow the cabinet's orders but that the situation may become clearer in the morning.
 
 
However, she says the one thing everyone does agrees on, at least for now, is that they do not want a return to violence.
 
 
Tension on streets
 
 
The election of a president requires a two-thirds majority, which means that the pro-Western ruling bloc - with only a slim majority - could not force its preferred candidate through parliament.
 
 
The tension was palpable on the streets as the crisis over electing the president came to a head, with the army deployed in force and schools closed, our correspondent says.
 
 
Checkpoints were set up and the ministry of interior suspended all firearm permits until further notice.
 
 
The crisis has raised fears of civil strife, including the possibility of rival administrations.
 
 
The issue has turned into a regional and international affair.
 
 
The US, Russia, Syria and Iran have all been intensely involved and there has been a lot of diplomatic shuttling between Damascus, Moscow, Tehran and Paris ahead of the end of Mr Lahoud's term.
 
 
 
 
E-mail this to a friend  Printable version 
 
 
Bookmark with:
 
Delicious Digg reddit Facebook StumbleUpon
 
What are these?
 
  VIDEO AND AUDIO NEWS
 
Troops on the streets amid fears of unrest
 
 
 
 
 
LEBANON POLITICAL CRISIS
 
 
 
KEY STORIES
 
Lebanese presidency ends in chaos
 
Lebanese fail to elect president
 
Lebanon president deadline looms
 
France decries Lebanon 'blockage'
 
 
 
BACKGROUND AND ANALYSIS
 
  Lebanon impasse
 
Rival factions are unable to come to an agreement on a new president.
 
 
Beirut diary: 12 November
 
Lebanon vote in balance
 
The Lebanese crisis explained
 
 
 
PROFILES
 
Who are the Maronites?
 
Profile: Fouad Siniora
 
Profile: Sheikh Hassan Nasrallah
 
Quick guide: Hezbollah
 
 
 
 
 
RELATED INTERNET LINKS
 
Lebanese presidency
 
Syria Gate (official site)
 
The BBC is not responsible for the content of external internet sites
 
 
 
TOP MIDDLE EAST STORIES
 
Lebanese presidency ends in chaos
 
 
Saudis to attend Mid-East summit
 
 
Israeli 'tried to spy for Iran'
 
 
| News feeds
 
 
 
MOST POPULAR STORIES NOW
 
MOST E-MAILED MOST READ Africa in pictures: 10-16 June
 
Many flee from Philippines storm
 
Chocolate lorry goes to Timbuktu
 
Australians vote to choose leader
 
Death-cheating cat dubbed bionic
 
Most popular now, in detail MOST E-MAILED MOST READ Lebanese presidency ends in chaos
 
Stricken Antarctic ship evacuated
 
Tanzania surgery mix-up man dies
 
Death-cheating cat dubbed bionic
 
Day in pictures
 
Most popular now, in detail
 
 
 
 
FEATURES, VIEWS, ANALYSIS  Shock to system
 
Rape case adds to notoriety of Brazilian prison regime
 
  Black day
 
Zimbabwe rhino killings put breeding project in jeopardy
 
  Day in pictures
 
Some of the most striking images from around the world
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
PRODUCTS & SERVICESE-mail news Mobiles Alerts News feeds Podcasts
 
BBC Copyright NoticeMMVIIMost Popular Now | The most read story in Australasia is: Lebanese presidency ends in chaos Back to top ^^ Help Privacy and cookies policy News sources About the BBC Contact us 
 
 
  HomeNewsSportRadioTVWeatherLanguages
 
   
 
 
UK versionInternational version|About the versions Low graphics|Accessibility help  One-Minute World News
 
 
  News services
 
Your news when you want it
 
 
 
News Front Page
 
 
Africa
 
Americas
 
Asia-Pacific
 
Europe
 
Middle East
 
South Asia
 
UK
 
Business
 
Health
 
Science/Nature
 
Technology
 
Entertainment
 
Also in the news
 
-----------------
 
Video and Audio
 
-----------------
 
Have Your Say
 
In Pictures
 
Country Profiles
 
Special Reports RELATED BBC SITES
 
SPORT
 
WEATHER
 
ON THIS DAY
 
EDITORS' BLOG
 
 
LANGUAGES
 
Arabic
 
Persian
 
Pashto
 
Turkish
 
French
 
More
 
  Last Updated: Friday, 23 November 2007, 22:50 GMT 
 
 
E-mail this to a friend  Printable version 
 
 
Lebanese presidency ends in chaos 
 
 
Mr Lahoud left office refusing to recognise the PM's government
 
The term of Lebanon's president has ended with no elected successor and a bitter dispute over who is in power.
 
Before pro-Syrian President Emile Lahoud left the presidential palace at midnight (2200 GMT) he issued an order that the army should take over control.
 
 
But pro-Western PM Fouad Siniora rejected the move and says that under the constitution he and his cabinet are in temporary power.
 
 
The latest in a series of attempts to find a new president failed on Friday.
 
 
The president is elected by parliament, but a vote was scuppered after the pro-Syrian opposition did not allow the necessary quorum to be achieved. A new vote has been scheduled for 30 November.
 
 
KEY STEPS
 
Vote scheduled 1300 (1100 GMT) Friday but not held. Speaker sets vote for 30 November
 
President Emile Lahoud's term expires 0000 Saturday
 
If the presidency become vacant, constitution says presidential powers passed to PM Fouad Siniora
 
 
 
Views from Beirut
 
Send us your comments 
 
 
Mr Lahoud refused to recognise Mr Siniora's government and analysts say his security move was effectively a call for a state of emergency.
 
 
The US has urged all parties to remain calm and said that under the constitution the Lebanese cabinet should "temporarily assume executive powers and responsibilities until a new president is elected".
 
 
Shortly before midnight, Mr Lahoud, 71, walked out of the Baabda presidential palace as the national anthem played, ending nine years in office.
 
 
AFP news agency quoted him as telling reporters: "If they do not elect a new consensual president, with the required two-thirds majority, we have men who can stand up."
 
 
The BBC's Kim Ghattas in Beirut says that opponents of Mr Lahoud have been celebrating the departure of man they see as the last remnant of Syrian influence over the country.
 
 
She says the country appears to be in the ultimate political limbo, with the rival parties even in disagreement over whether a state of emergency exists.
 
 
'Not valid'
 
 
A few hours before his term was due to end, Mr Lahoud issued a statement via a spokesman, Rafiq Shalala.
 
 
It said the army would have responsibility for maintaining order throughout the country.
 
 
 
Mr Siniora says he should take over temporarily under the constitution
 
 
"There are conditions and risks on the ground that could lead to a state of emergency," Mr Shalala said.
 
 
However, constitutionally Mr Lahoud could not call for a state of emergency without the backing of the government he did not recognise.
 
 
Mr Shalala said the army would "submit the measures it takes to the cabinet once there is one that is constitutional".
 
 
A spokesman for Mr Siniora told AFP news agency: "The statement issued by the general directorate of the president of the republic is not valid and is unconstitutional. It is as if the statement was never issued."
 
 
The head of the army has refused to comment. Gen Michel Suleiman was appointed by Mr Lahoud but has largely sought to keep the military neutral.
 
 
Our correspondent says there are reports that he has agreed to follow the cabinet's orders but that the situation may become clearer in the morning.
 
 
However, she says the one thing everyone does agrees on, at least for now, is that they do not want a return to violence.
 
 
Tension on streets
 
 
The election of a president requires a two-thirds majority, which means that the pro-Western ruling bloc - with only a slim majority - could not force its preferred candidate through parliament.
 
 
The tension was palpable on the streets as the crisis over electing the president came to a head, with the army deployed in force and schools closed, our correspondent says.
 
 
Checkpoints were set up and the ministry of interior suspended all firearm permits until further notice.
 
 
The crisis has raised fears of civil strife, including the possibility of rival administrations.
 
 
The issue has turned into a regional and international affair.
 
 
The US, Russia, Syria and Iran have all been intensely involved and there has been a lot of diplomatic shuttling between Damascus, Moscow, Tehran and Paris ahead of the end of Mr Lahoud's term.
 
 
 
 
E-mail this to a friend  Printable version 
 
 
Bookmark with:
 
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What are these?
 
  VIDEO AND AUDIO NEWS
 
Troops on the streets amid fears of unrest
 
 
 
 
 
LEBANON POLITICAL CRISIS
 
 
 
KEY STORIES
 
Lebanese presidency ends in chaos
 
Lebanese fail to elect president
 
Lebanon president deadline looms
 
France decries Lebanon 'blockage'
 
 
 
BACKGROUND AND ANALYSIS
 
  Lebanon impasse
 
Rival factions are unable to come to an agreement on a new president.
 
 
Beirut diary: 12 November
 
Lebanon vote in balance
 
The Lebanese crisis explained
 
 
 
PROFILES
 
Who are the Maronites?
 
Profile: Fouad Siniora
 
Profile: Sheikh Hassan Nasrallah
 
Quick guide: Hezbollah
 
 
 
 
 
RELATED INTERNET LINKS
 
Lebanese presidency
 
Syria Gate (official site)
 
The BBC is not responsible for the content of external internet sites
 
 
 
TOP MIDDLE EAST STORIES
 
Lebanese presidency ends in chaos
 
 
Saudis to attend Mid-East summit
 
 
Israeli 'tried to spy for Iran'
 
 
| News feeds
 
 
 
MOST POPULAR STORIES NOW
 
MOST E-MAILED MOST READ Africa in pictures: 10-16 June
 
Many flee from Philippines storm
 
Chocolate lorry goes to Timbuktu
 
Australians vote to choose leader
 
Death-cheating cat dubbed bionic
 
Most popular now, in detail MOST E-MAILED MOST READ Lebanese presidency ends in chaos
 
Stricken Antarctic ship evacuated
 
Tanzania surgery mix-up man dies
 
Death-cheating cat dubbed bionic
 
Day in pictures
 
Most popular now, in detail
 
 
 
 
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Rape case adds to notoriety of Brazilian prison regime
 
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  Last Updated: Friday, 23 November 2007, 22:50 GMT 
 
 
E-mail this to a friend  Printable version 
 
 
Lebanese presidency ends in chaos 
 
 
Mr Lahoud left office refusing to recognise the PM's government
 
The term of Lebanon's president has ended with no elected successor and a bitter dispute over who is in power.
 
Before pro-Syrian President Emile Lahoud left the presidential palace at midnight (2200 GMT) he issued an order that the army should take over control.
 
 
But pro-Western PM Fouad Siniora rejected the move and says that under the constitution he and his cabinet are in temporary power.
 
 
The latest in a series of attempts to find a new president failed on Friday.
 
 
The president is elected by parliament, but a vote was scuppered after the pro-Syrian opposition did not allow the necessary quorum to be achieved. A new vote has been scheduled for 30 November.
 
 
KEY STEPS
 
Vote scheduled 1300 (1100 GMT) Friday but not held. Speaker sets vote for 30 November
 
President Emile Lahoud's term expires 0000 Saturday
 
If the presidency become vacant, constitution says presidential powers passed to PM Fouad Siniora
 
 
 
Views from Beirut
 
Send us your comments 
 
 
Mr Lahoud refused to recognise Mr Siniora's government and analysts say his security move was effectively a call for a state of emergency.
 
 
The US has urged all parties to remain calm and said that under the constitution the Lebanese cabinet should "temporarily assume executive powers and responsibilities until a new president is elected".
 
 
Shortly before midnight, Mr Lahoud, 71, walked out of the Baabda presidential palace as the national anthem played, ending nine years in office.
 
 
AFP news agency quoted him as telling reporters: "If they do not elect a new consensual president, with the required two-thirds majority, we have men who can stand up."
 
 
The BBC's Kim Ghattas in Beirut says that opponents of Mr Lahoud have been celebrating the departure of man they see as the last remnant of Syrian influence over the country.
 
 
She says the country appears to be in the ultimate political limbo, with the rival parties even in disagreement over whether a state of emergency exists.
 
 
'Not valid'
 
 
A few hours before his term was due to end, Mr Lahoud issued a statement via a spokesman, Rafiq Shalala.
 
 
It said the army would have responsibility for maintaining order throughout the country.
 
 
 
Mr Siniora says he should take over temporarily under the constitution
 
 
"There are conditions and risks on the ground that could lead to a state of emergency," Mr Shalala said.
 
 
However, constitutionally Mr Lahoud could not call for a state of emergency without the backing of the government he did not recognise.
 
 
Mr Shalala said the army would "submit the measures it takes to the cabinet once there is one that is constitutional".
 
 
A spokesman for Mr Siniora told AFP news agency: "The statement issued by the general directorate of the president of the republic is not valid and is unconstitutional. It is as if the statement was never issued."
 
 
The head of the army has refused to comment. Gen Michel Suleiman was appointed by Mr Lahoud but has largely sought to keep the military neutral.
 
 
Our correspondent says there are reports that he has agreed to follow the cabinet's orders but that the situation may become clearer in the morning.
 
 
However, she says the one thing everyone does agrees on, at least for now, is that they do not want a return to violence.
 
 
Tension on streets
 
 
The election of a president requires a two-thirds majority, which means that the pro-Western ruling bloc - with only a slim majority - could not force its preferred candidate through parliament.
 
 
The tension was palpable on the streets as the crisis over electing the president came to a head, with the army deployed in force and schools closed, our correspondent says.
 
 
Checkpoints were set up and the ministry of interior suspended all firearm permits until further notice.
 
 
The crisis has raised fears of civil strife, including the possibility of rival administrations.
 
 
The issue has turned into a regional and international affair.
 
 
The US, Russia, Syria and Iran have all been intensely involved and there has been a lot of diplomatic shuttling between Damascus, Moscow, Tehran and Paris ahead of the end of Mr Lahoud's term.
 
 
 
 
E-mail this to a friend  Printable version 
 
 
Bookmark with:
 
Delicious Digg reddit Facebook StumbleUpon
 
What are these?
 
  VIDEO AND AUDIO NEWS
 
Troops on the streets amid fears of unrest
 
 
 
 
 
LEBANON POLITICAL CRISIS
 
 
 
KEY STORIES
 
Lebanese presidency ends in chaos
 
Lebanese fail to elect president
 
Lebanon president deadline looms
 
France decries Lebanon 'blockage'
 
 
 
BACKGROUND AND ANALYSIS
 
  Lebanon impasse
 
Rival factions are unable to come to an agreement on a new president.
 
 
Beirut diary: 12 November
 
Lebanon vote in balance
 
The Lebanese crisis explained
 
 
 
PROFILES
 
Who are the Maronites?
 
Profile: Fouad Siniora
 
Profile: Sheikh Hassan Nasrallah
 
Quick guide: Hezbollah
 
 
 
 
 
RELATED INTERNET LINKS
 
Lebanese presidency
 
Syria Gate (official site)
 
The BBC is not responsible for the content of external internet sites
 
 
 
TOP MIDDLE EAST STORIES
 
Lebanese presidency ends in chaos
 
 
Saudis to attend Mid-East summit
 
 
Israeli 'tried to spy for Iran'
 
 
| News feeds
 
 
 
MOST POPULAR STORIES NOW
 
MOST E-MAILED MOST READ Africa in pictures: 10-16 June
 
Many flee from Philippines storm
 
Chocolate lorry goes to Timbuktu
 
Australians vote to choose leader
 
Death-cheating cat dubbed bionic
 
Most popular now, in detail MOST E-MAILED MOST READ Lebanese presidency ends in chaos
 
Stricken Antarctic ship evacuated
 
Tanzania surgery mix-up man dies
 
Death-cheating cat dubbed bionic
 
Day in pictures
 
Most popular now, in detail
 
 
 
 
FEATURES, VIEWS, ANALYSIS  Shock to system
 
Rape case adds to notoriety of Brazilian prison regime
 
  Black day
 
Zimbabwe rhino killings put breeding project in jeopardy
 
  Day in pictures
 
Some of the most striking images from around the world
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
PRODUCTS & SERVICESE-mail news Mobiles Alerts News feeds Podcasts
 
BBC Copyright NoticeMMVIIMost Popular Now | The most read story in Australasia is: Lebanese presidency ends in chaos Back to top ^^ Help Privacy and cookies policy News sources About the BBC Contact us 
 
 
  HomeNewsSportRadioTVWeatherLanguages
 
   
 
 
UK versionInternational version|About the versions Low graphics|Accessibility help  One-Minute World News
 
 
  News services
 
Your news when you want it
 
 
 
News Front Page
 
 
Africa
 
Americas
 
Asia-Pacific
 
Europe
 
Middle East
 
South Asia
 
UK
 
Business
 
Health
 
Science/Nature
 
Technology
 
Entertainment
 
Also in the news
 
-----------------
 
Video and Audio
 
-----------------
 
Have Your Say
 
In Pictures
 
Country Profiles
 
Special Reports RELATED BBC SITES
 
SPORT
 
WEATHER
 
ON THIS DAY
 
EDITORS' BLOG
 
 
LANGUAGES
 
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Persian
 
Pashto
 
Turkish
 
French
 
More
 
  Last Updated: Friday, 23 November 2007, 22:50 GMT 
 
 
E-mail this to a friend  Printable version 
 
 
Lebanese presidency ends in chaos 
 
 
Mr Lahoud left office refusing to recognise the PM's government
 
The term of Lebanon's president has ended with no elected successor and a bitter dispute over who is in power.
 
Before pro-Syrian President Emile Lahoud left the presidential palace at midnight (2200 GMT) he issued an order that the army should take over control.
 
 
But pro-Western PM Fouad Siniora rejected the move and says that under the constitution he and his cabinet are in temporary power.
 
 
The latest in a series of attempts to find a new president failed on Friday.
 
 
The president is elected by parliament, but a vote was scuppered after the pro-Syrian opposition did not allow the necessary quorum to be achieved. A new vote has been scheduled for 30 November.
 
 
KEY STEPS
 
Vote scheduled 1300 (1100 GMT) Friday but not held. Speaker sets vote for 30 November
 
President Emile Lahoud's term expires 0000 Saturday
 
If the presidency become vacant, constitution says presidential powers passed to PM Fouad Siniora
 
 
 
Views from Beirut
 
Send us your comments 
 
 
Mr Lahoud refused to recognise Mr Siniora's government and analysts say his security move was effectively a call for a state of emergency.
 
 
The US has urged all parties to remain calm and said that under the constitution the Lebanese cabinet should "temporarily assume executive powers and responsibilities until a new president is elected".
 
 
Shortly before midnight, Mr Lahoud, 71, walked out of the Baabda presidential palace as the national anthem played, ending nine years in office.
 
 
AFP news agency quoted him as telling reporters: "If they do not elect a new consensual president, with the required two-thirds majority, we have men who can stand up."
 
 
The BBC's Kim Ghattas in Beirut says that opponents of Mr Lahoud have been celebrating the departure of man they see as the last remnant of Syrian influence over the country.
 
 
She says the country appears to be in the ultimate political limbo, with the rival parties even in disagreement over whether a state of emergency exists.
 
 
'Not valid'
 
 
A few hours before his term was due to end, Mr Lahoud issued a statement via a spokesman, Rafiq Shalala.
 
 
It said the army would have responsibility for maintaining order throughout the country.
 
 
 
Mr Siniora says he should take over temporarily under the constitution
 
 
"There are conditions and risks on the ground that could lead to a state of emergency," Mr Shalala said.
 
 
However, constitutionally Mr Lahoud could not call for a state of emergency without the backing of the government he did not recognise.
 
 
Mr Shalala said the army would "submit the measures it takes to the cabinet once there is one that is constitutional".
 
 
A spokesman for Mr Siniora told AFP news agency: "The statement issued by the general directorate of the president of the republic is not valid and is unconstitutional. It is as if the statement was never issued."
 
 
The head of the army has refused to comment. Gen Michel Suleiman was appointed by Mr Lahoud but has largely sought to keep the military neutral.
 
 
Our correspondent says there are reports that he has agreed to follow the cabinet's orders but that the situation may become clearer in the morning.
 
 
However, she says the one thing everyone does agrees on, at least for now, is that they do not want a return to violence.
 
 
Tension on streets
 
 
The election of a president requires a two-thirds majority, which means that the pro-Western ruling bloc - with only a slim majority - could not force its preferred candidate through parliament.
 
 
The tension was palpable on the streets as the crisis over electing the president came to a head, with the army deployed in force and schools closed, our correspondent says.
 
 
Checkpoints were set up and the ministry of interior suspended all firearm permits until further notice.
 
 
The crisis has raised fears of civil strife, including the possibility of rival administrations.
 
 
The issue has turned into a regional and international affair.
 
 
The US, Russia, Syria and Iran have all been intensely involved and there has been a lot of diplomatic shuttling between Damascus, Moscow, Tehran and Paris ahead of the end of Mr Lahoud's term.
 
 
 
 
E-mail this to a friend  Printable version 
 
 
Bookmark with:
 
Delicious Digg reddit Facebook StumbleUpon
 
What are these?
 
  VIDEO AND AUDIO NEWS
 
Troops on the streets amid fears of unrest
 
 
 
 
 
LEBANON POLITICAL CRISIS
 
 
 
KEY STORIES
 
Lebanese presidency ends in chaos
 
Lebanese fail to elect president
 
Lebanon president deadline looms
 
France decries Lebanon 'blockage'
 
 
 
BACKGROUND AND ANALYSIS
 
  Lebanon impasse
 
Rival factions are unable to come to an agreement on a new president.
 
 
Beirut diary: 12 November
 
Lebanon vote in balance
 
The Lebanese crisis explained
 
 
 
PROFILES
 
Who are the Maronites?
 
Profile: Fouad Siniora
 
Profile: Sheikh Hassan Nasrallah
 
Quick guide: Hezbollah
 
 
 
 
 
RELATED INTERNET LINKS
 
Lebanese presidency
 
Syria Gate (official site)
 
The BBC is not responsible for the content of external internet sites
 
 
 
TOP MIDDLE EAST STORIES
 
Lebanese presidency ends in chaos
 
 
Saudis to attend Mid-East summit
 
 
Israeli 'tried to spy for Iran'
 
 
| News feeds
 
 
 
MOST POPULAR STORIES NOW
 
MOST E-MAILED MOST READ Africa in pictures: 10-16 June
 
Many flee from Philippines storm
 
Chocolate lorry goes to Timbuktu
 
Australians vote to choose leader
 
Death-cheating cat dubbed bionic
 
Most popular now, in detail MOST E-MAILED MOST READ Lebanese presidency ends in chaos
 
Stricken Antarctic ship evacuated
 
Tanzania surgery mix-up man dies
 
Death-cheating cat dubbed bionic
 
Day in pictures
 
Most popular now, in detail
 
 
 
 
FEATURES, VIEWS, ANALYSIS  Shock to system
 
Rape case adds to notoriety of Brazilian prison regime
 
  Black day
 
Zimbabwe rhino killings put breeding project in jeopardy
 
  Day in pictures
 
Some of the most striking images from around the world
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
PRODUCTS & SERVICESE-mail news Mobiles Alerts News feeds Podcasts
 
BBC Copyright NoticeMMVIIMost Popular Now | The most read story in Australasia is: Lebanese presidency ends in chaos Back to top ^^ Help Privacy and cookies policy News sources About the BBC Contact us 
 
 
  HomeNewsSportRadioTVWeatherLanguages
 
   
 
 
UK versionInternational version|About the versions Low graphics|Accessibility help  One-Minute World News
 
 
  News services
 
Your news when you want it
 
 
 
News Front Page
 
 
Africa
 
Americas
 
Asia-Pacific
 
Europe
 
Middle East
 
South Asia
 
UK
 
Business
 
Health
 
Science/Nature
 
Technology
 
Entertainment
 
Also in the news
 
-----------------
 
Video and Audio
 
-----------------
 
Have Your Say
 
In Pictures
 
Country Profiles
 
Special Reports RELATED BBC SITES
 
SPORT
 
WEATHER
 
ON THIS DAY
 
EDITORS' BLOG
 
 
LANGUAGES
 
Arabic
 
Persian
 
Pashto
 
Turkish
 
French
 
More
 
  Last Updated: Friday, 23 November 2007, 22:50 GMT 
 
 
E-mail this to a friend  Printable version 
 
 
Lebanese presidency ends in chaos 
 
 
Mr Lahoud left office refusing to recognise the PM's government
 
The term of Lebanon's president has ended with no elected successor and a bitter dispute over who is in power.
 
Before pro-Syrian President Emile Lahoud left the presidential palace at midnight (2200 GMT) he issued an order that the army should take over control.
 
 
But pro-Western PM Fouad Siniora rejected the move and says that under the constitution he and his cabinet are in temporary power.
 
 
The latest in a series of attempts to find a new president failed on Friday.
 
 
The president is elected by parliament, but a vote was scuppered after the pro-Syrian opposition did not allow the necessary quorum to be achieved. A new vote has been scheduled for 30 November.
 
 
KEY STEPS
 
Vote scheduled 1300 (1100 GMT) Friday but not held. Speaker sets vote for 30 November
 
President Emile Lahoud's term expires 0000 Saturday
 
If the presidency become vacant, constitution says presidential powers passed to PM Fouad Siniora
 
 
 
Views from Beirut
 
Send us your comments 
 
 
Mr Lahoud refused to recognise Mr Siniora's government and analysts say his security move was effectively a call for a state of emergency.
 
 
The US has urged all parties to remain calm and said that under the constitution the Lebanese cabinet should "temporarily assume executive powers and responsibilities until a new president is elected".
 
 
Shortly before midnight, Mr Lahoud, 71, walked out of the Baabda presidential palace as the national anthem played, ending nine years in office.
 
 
AFP news agency quoted him as telling reporters: "If they do not elect a new consensual president, with the required two-thirds majority, we have men who can stand up."
 
 
The BBC's Kim Ghattas in Beirut says that opponents of Mr Lahoud have been celebrating the departure of man they see as the last remnant of Syrian influence over the country.
 
 
She says the country appears to be in the ultimate political limbo, with the rival parties even in disagreement over whether a state of emergency exists.
 
 
'Not valid'
 
 
A few hours before his term was due to end, Mr Lahoud issued a statement via a spokesman, Rafiq Shalala.
 
 
It said the army would have responsibility for maintaining order throughout the country.
 
 
 
Mr Siniora says he should take over temporarily under the constitution
 
 
"There are conditions and risks on the ground that could lead to a state of emergency," Mr Shalala said.
 
 
However, constitutionally Mr Lahoud could not call for a state of emergency without the backing of the government he did not recognise.
 
 
Mr Shalala said the army would "submit the measures it takes to the cabinet once there is one that is constitutional".
 
 
A spokesman for Mr Siniora told AFP news agency: "The statement issued by the general directorate of the president of the republic is not valid and is unconstitutional. It is as if the statement was never issued."
 
 
The head of the army has refused to comment. Gen Michel Suleiman was appointed by Mr Lahoud but has largely sought to keep the military neutral.
 
 
Our correspondent says there are reports that he has agreed to follow the cabinet's orders but that the situation may become clearer in the morning.
 
 
However, she says the one thing everyone does agrees on, at least for now, is that they do not want a return to violence.
 
 
Tension on streets
 
 
The election of a president requires a two-thirds majority, which means that the pro-Western ruling bloc - with only a slim majority - could not force its preferred candidate through parliament.
 
 
The tension was palpable on the streets as the crisis over electing the president came to a head, with the army deployed in force and schools closed, our correspondent says.
 
 
Checkpoints were set up and the ministry of interior suspended all firearm permits until further notice.
 
 
The crisis has raised fears of civil strife, including the possibility of rival administrations.
 
 
The issue has turned into a regional and international affair.
 
 
The US, Russia, Syria and Iran have all been intensely involved and there has been a lot of diplomatic shuttling between Damascus, Moscow, Tehran and Paris ahead of the end of Mr Lahoud's term.
 
 
 
 
E-mail this to a friend  Printable version 
 
 
Bookmark with:
 
Delicious Digg reddit Facebook StumbleUpon
 
What are these?
 
  VIDEO AND AUDIO NEWS
 
Troops on the streets amid fears of unrest
 
 
 
 
 
LEBANON POLITICAL CRISIS
 
 
 
KEY STORIES
 
Lebanese presidency ends in chaos
 
Lebanese fail to elect president
 
Lebanon president deadline looms
 
France decries Lebanon 'blockage'
 
 
 
BACKGROUND AND ANALYSIS
 
  Lebanon impasse
 
Rival factions are unable to come to an agreement on a new president.
 
 
Beirut diary: 12 November
 
Lebanon vote in balance
 
The Lebanese crisis explained
 
 
 
PROFILES
 
Who are the Maronites?
 
Profile: Fouad Siniora
 
Profile: Sheikh Hassan Nasrallah
 
Quick guide: Hezbollah
 
 
 
 
 
RELATED INTERNET LINKS
 
Lebanese presidency
 
Syria Gate (official site)
 
The BBC is not responsible for the content of external internet sites
 
 
 
TOP MIDDLE EAST STORIES
 
Lebanese presidency ends in chaos
 
 
Saudis to attend Mid-East summit
 
 
Israeli 'tried to spy for Iran'
 
 
| News feeds
 
 
 
MOST POPULAR STORIES NOW
 
MOST E-MAILED MOST READ Africa in pictures: 10-16 June
 
Many flee from Philippines storm
 
Chocolate lorry goes to Timbuktu
 
Australians vote to choose leader
 
Death-cheating cat dubbed bionic
 
Most popular now, in detail MOST E-MAILED MOST READ Lebanese presidency ends in chaos
 
Stricken Antarctic ship evacuated
 
Tanzania surgery mix-up man dies
 
Death-cheating cat dubbed bionic
 
Day in pictures
 
Most popular now, in detail
 
 
 
 
FEATURES, VIEWS, ANALYSIS  Shock to system
 
Rape case adds to notoriety of Brazilian prison regime
 
  Black day
 
Zimbabwe rhino killings put breeding project in jeopardy
 
  Day in pictures
 
Some of the most striking images from around the world
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
PRODUCTS & SERVICESE-mail news Mobiles Alerts News feeds Podcasts
 
BBC Copyright NoticeMMVIIMost Popular Now | The most read story in Australasia is: Lebanese presidency ends in chaos Back to top ^^ Help Privacy and cookies policy News sources About the BBC Contact us 
 
 
 
== Ciutats ==
 
* [[Chanthaburi|Chanthaburi]]
 
* [[Chonburi|Chonburi]]
 
* [[Pattaya]]
 
* [[Prachinburi|Prachinburi]]
 
* [[Rayong|Rayong]]
 
* [[Si Racha]]
 
* [[Trat]]
 
* [[Chanthaburi]]
 
 
== Altres destins ==
 
 
== Comprendre ==
 
 
== Arribar-hi ==
 
 
== Circular ==
 
 
== Parlar ==
 
 
== Comprar ==
 
 
== Menjar ==
 
 
== Beure i sortir ==
 
 
== Dormir ==
 
 
== Aprendre ==
 
 
== Treballar ==
 
 
== Seguretat ==
 
 
== Salut ==
 
 
== Respectar ==
 
 
== Mantenir contacte ==
 
 
== Anar-se'n ==
 
{{IsIn|Tailàndia}}
 
L''''este''' és una regió de [[Tailàndia]].
 
 
== Províncias ==
 
* [[Chachoengsao_(província)|Chachoengsao]]
 
* [[Chanthaburi_(província)|Chanthaburi]]
 
* [[Chonburi_(província)|Chonburi]]
 
* [[Prachinburi_(província)|Prachinburi]]
 
* [[Rayong_(província)|Rayong]]
 
* [[Sa Kaew_(província)|Sa Kaew]]
 
* [[Trat_(província)|Trat]]
 
  HomeNewsSportRadioTVWeatherLanguages
 
   
 
 
UK versionInternational version|About the versions Low graphics|Accessibility help  One-Minute World News
 
 
  News services
 
Your news when you want it
 
 
 
News Front Page
 
 
Africa
 
Americas
 
Asia-Pacific
 
Europe
 
Middle East
 
South Asia
 
UK
 
Business
 
Health
 
Science/Nature
 
Technology
 
Entertainment
 
Also in the news
 
-----------------
 
Video and Audio
 
-----------------
 
Have Your Say
 
In Pictures
 
Country Profiles
 
Special Reports RELATED BBC SITES
 
SPORT
 
WEATHER
 
ON THIS DAY
 
EDITORS' BLOG
 
 
LANGUAGES
 
Arabic
 
Persian
 
Pashto
 
Turkish
 
French
 
More
 
  Last Updated: Friday, 23 November 2007, 22:50 GMT 
 
 
E-mail this to a friend  Printable version 
 
 
Lebanese presidency ends in chaos 
 
 
Mr Lahoud left office refusing to recognise the PM's government
 
The term of Lebanon's president has ended with no elected successor and a bitter dispute over who is in power.
 
Before pro-Syrian President Emile Lahoud left the presidential palace at midnight (2200 GMT) he issued an order that the army should take over control.
 
 
But pro-Western PM Fouad Siniora rejected the move and says that under the constitution he and his cabinet are in temporary power.
 
 
The latest in a series of attempts to find a new president failed on Friday.
 
 
The president is elected by parliament, but a vote was scuppered after the pro-Syrian opposition did not allow the necessary quorum to be achieved. A new vote has been scheduled for 30 November.
 
 
KEY STEPS
 
Vote scheduled 1300 (1100 GMT) Friday but not held. Speaker sets vote for 30 November
 
President Emile Lahoud's term expires 0000 Saturday
 
If the presidency become vacant, constitution says presidential powers passed to PM Fouad Siniora
 
 
 
Views from Beirut
 
Send us your comments 
 
 
Mr Lahoud refused to recognise Mr Siniora's government and analysts say his security move was effectively a call for a state of emergency.
 
 
The US has urged all parties to remain calm and said that under the constitution the Lebanese cabinet should "temporarily assume executive powers and responsibilities until a new president is elected".
 
 
Shortly before midnight, Mr Lahoud, 71, walked out of the Baabda presidential palace as the national anthem played, ending nine years in office.
 
 
AFP news agency quoted him as telling reporters: "If they do not elect a new consensual president, with the required two-thirds majority, we have men who can stand up."
 
 
The BBC's Kim Ghattas in Beirut says that opponents of Mr Lahoud have been celebrating the departure of man they see as the last remnant of Syrian influence over the country.
 
 
She says the country appears to be in the ultimate political limbo, with the rival parties even in disagreement over whether a state of emergency exists.
 
 
'Not valid'
 
 
A few hours before his term was due to end, Mr Lahoud issued a statement via a spokesman, Rafiq Shalala.
 
 
It said the army would have responsibility for maintaining order throughout the country.
 
 
 
Mr Siniora says he should take over temporarily under the constitution
 
 
"There are conditions and risks on the ground that could lead to a state of emergency," Mr Shalala said.
 
 
However, constitutionally Mr Lahoud could not call for a state of emergency without the backing of the government he did not recognise.
 
 
Mr Shalala said the army would "submit the measures it takes to the cabinet once there is one that is constitutional".
 
 
A spokesman for Mr Siniora told AFP news agency: "The statement issued by the general directorate of the president of the republic is not valid and is unconstitutional. It is as if the statement was never issued."
 
 
The head of the army has refused to comment. Gen Michel Suleiman was appointed by Mr Lahoud but has largely sought to keep the military neutral.
 
 
Our correspondent says there are reports that he has agreed to follow the cabinet's orders but that the situation may become clearer in the morning.
 
 
However, she says the one thing everyone does agrees on, at least for now, is that they do not want a return to violence.
 
 
Tension on streets
 
 
The election of a president requires a two-thirds majority, which means that the pro-Western ruling bloc - with only a slim majority - could not force its preferred candidate through parliament.
 
 
The tension was palpable on the streets as the crisis over electing the president came to a head, with the army deployed in force and schools closed, our correspondent says.
 
 
Checkpoints were set up and the ministry of interior suspended all firearm permits until further notice.
 
 
The crisis has raised fears of civil strife, including the possibility of rival administrations.
 
 
The issue has turned into a regional and international affair.
 
 
The US, Russia, Syria and Iran have all been intensely involved and there has been a lot of diplomatic shuttling between Damascus, Moscow, Tehran and Paris ahead of the end of Mr Lahoud's term.
 
 
 
 
E-mail this to a friend  Printable version 
 
 
Bookmark with:
 
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What are these?
 
  VIDEO AND AUDIO NEWS
 
Troops on the streets amid fears of unrest
 
 
 
 
 
LEBANON POLITICAL CRISIS
 
 
 
KEY STORIES
 
Lebanese presidency ends in chaos
 
Lebanese fail to elect president
 
Lebanon president deadline looms
 
France decries Lebanon 'blockage'
 
 
 
BACKGROUND AND ANALYSIS
 
  Lebanon impasse
 
Rival factions are unable to come to an agreement on a new president.
 
 
Beirut diary: 12 November
 
Lebanon vote in balance
 
The Lebanese crisis explained
 
 
 
PROFILES
 
Who are the Maronites?
 
Profile: Fouad Siniora
 
Profile: Sheikh Hassan Nasrallah
 
Quick guide: Hezbollah
 
 
 
 
 
RELATED INTERNET LINKS
 
Lebanese presidency
 
Syria Gate (official site)
 
The BBC is not responsible for the content of external internet sites
 
 
 
TOP MIDDLE EAST STORIES
 
Lebanese presidency ends in chaos
 
 
Saudis to attend Mid-East summit
 
 
Israeli 'tried to spy for Iran'
 
 
| News feeds
 
 
 
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MOST E-MAILED MOST READ Africa in pictures: 10-16 June
 
Many flee from Philippines storm
 
Chocolate lorry goes to Timbuktu
 
Australians vote to choose leader
 
Death-cheating cat dubbed bionic
 
Most popular now, in detail MOST E-MAILED MOST READ Lebanese presidency ends in chaos
 
Stricken Antarctic ship evacuated
 
Tanzania surgery mix-up man dies
 
Death-cheating cat dubbed bionic
 
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  Last Updated: Friday, 23 November 2007, 22:50 GMT 
 
 
E-mail this to a friend  Printable version 
 
 
Lebanese presidency ends in chaos 
 
 
Mr Lahoud left office refusing to recognise the PM's government
 
The term of Lebanon's president has ended with no elected successor and a bitter dispute over who is in power.
 
Before pro-Syrian President Emile Lahoud left the presidential palace at midnight (2200 GMT) he issued an order that the army should take over control.
 
 
But pro-Western PM Fouad Siniora rejected the move and says that under the constitution he and his cabinet are in temporary power.
 
 
The latest in a series of attempts to find a new president failed on Friday.
 
 
The president is elected by parliament, but a vote was scuppered after the pro-Syrian opposition did not allow the necessary quorum to be achieved. A new vote has been scheduled for 30 November.
 
 
KEY STEPS
 
Vote scheduled 1300 (1100 GMT) Friday but not held. Speaker sets vote for 30 November
 
President Emile Lahoud's term expires 0000 Saturday
 
If the presidency become vacant, constitution says presidential powers passed to PM Fouad Siniora
 
 
 
Views from Beirut
 
Send us your comments 
 
 
Mr Lahoud refused to recognise Mr Siniora's government and analysts say his security move was effectively a call for a state of emergency.
 
 
The US has urged all parties to remain calm and said that under the constitution the Lebanese cabinet should "temporarily assume executive powers and responsibilities until a new president is elected".
 
 
Shortly before midnight, Mr Lahoud, 71, walked out of the Baabda presidential palace as the national anthem played, ending nine years in office.
 
 
AFP news agency quoted him as telling reporters: "If they do not elect a new consensual president, with the required two-thirds majority, we have men who can stand up."
 
 
The BBC's Kim Ghattas in Beirut says that opponents of Mr Lahoud have been celebrating the departure of man they see as the last remnant of Syrian influence over the country.
 
 
She says the country appears to be in the ultimate political limbo, with the rival parties even in disagreement over whether a state of emergency exists.
 
 
'Not valid'
 
 
A few hours before his term was due to end, Mr Lahoud issued a statement via a spokesman, Rafiq Shalala.
 
 
It said the army would have responsibility for maintaining order throughout the country.
 
 
 
Mr Siniora says he should take over temporarily under the constitution
 
 
"There are conditions and risks on the ground that could lead to a state of emergency," Mr Shalala said.
 
 
However, constitutionally Mr Lahoud could not call for a state of emergency without the backing of the government he did not recognise.
 
 
Mr Shalala said the army would "submit the measures it takes to the cabinet once there is one that is constitutional".
 
 
A spokesman for Mr Siniora told AFP news agency: "The statement issued by the general directorate of the president of the republic is not valid and is unconstitutional. It is as if the statement was never issued."
 
 
The head of the army has refused to comment. Gen Michel Suleiman was appointed by Mr Lahoud but has largely sought to keep the military neutral.
 
 
Our correspondent says there are reports that he has agreed to follow the cabinet's orders but that the situation may become clearer in the morning.
 
 
However, she says the one thing everyone does agrees on, at least for now, is that they do not want a return to violence.
 
 
Tension on streets
 
 
The election of a president requires a two-thirds majority, which means that the pro-Western ruling bloc - with only a slim majority - could not force its preferred candidate through parliament.
 
 
The tension was palpable on the streets as the crisis over electing the president came to a head, with the army deployed in force and schools closed, our correspondent says.
 
 
Checkpoints were set up and the ministry of interior suspended all firearm permits until further notice.
 
 
The crisis has raised fears of civil strife, including the possibility of rival administrations.
 
 
The issue has turned into a regional and international affair.
 
 
The US, Russia, Syria and Iran have all been intensely involved and there has been a lot of diplomatic shuttling between Damascus, Moscow, Tehran and Paris ahead of the end of Mr Lahoud's term.
 
 
 
 
E-mail this to a friend  Printable version 
 
 
Bookmark with:
 
Delicious Digg reddit Facebook StumbleUpon
 
What are these?
 
  VIDEO AND AUDIO NEWS
 
Troops on the streets amid fears of unrest
 
 
 
 
 
LEBANON POLITICAL CRISIS
 
 
 
KEY STORIES
 
Lebanese presidency ends in chaos
 
Lebanese fail to elect president
 
Lebanon president deadline looms
 
France decries Lebanon 'blockage'
 
 
 
BACKGROUND AND ANALYSIS
 
  Lebanon impasse
 
Rival factions are unable to come to an agreement on a new president.
 
 
Beirut diary: 12 November
 
Lebanon vote in balance
 
The Lebanese crisis explained
 
 
 
PROFILES
 
Who are the Maronites?
 
Profile: Fouad Siniora
 
Profile: Sheikh Hassan Nasrallah
 
Quick guide: Hezbollah
 
 
 
 
 
RELATED INTERNET LINKS
 
Lebanese presidency
 
Syria Gate (official site)
 
The BBC is not responsible for the content of external internet sites
 
 
 
TOP MIDDLE EAST STORIES
 
Lebanese presidency ends in chaos
 
 
Saudis to attend Mid-East summit
 
 
Israeli 'tried to spy for Iran'
 
 
| News feeds
 
 
 
MOST POPULAR STORIES NOW
 
MOST E-MAILED MOST READ Africa in pictures: 10-16 June
 
Many flee from Philippines storm
 
Chocolate lorry goes to Timbuktu
 
Australians vote to choose leader
 
Death-cheating cat dubbed bionic
 
Most popular now, in detail MOST E-MAILED MOST READ Lebanese presidency ends in chaos
 
Stricken Antarctic ship evacuated
 
Tanzania surgery mix-up man dies
 
Death-cheating cat dubbed bionic
 
Day in pictures
 
Most popular now, in detail
 
 
 
 
FEATURES, VIEWS, ANALYSIS  Shock to system
 
Rape case adds to notoriety of Brazilian prison regime
 
  Black day
 
Zimbabwe rhino killings put breeding project in jeopardy
 
  Day in pictures
 
Some of the most striking images from around the world
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
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More
 
  Last Updated: Friday, 23 November 2007, 22:50 GMT 
 
 
E-mail this to a friend  Printable version 
 
 
Lebanese presidency ends in chaos 
 
 
Mr Lahoud left office refusing to recognise the PM's government
 
The term of Lebanon's president has ended with no elected successor and a bitter dispute over who is in power.
 
Before pro-Syrian President Emile Lahoud left the presidential palace at midnight (2200 GMT) he issued an order that the army should take over control.
 
 
But pro-Western PM Fouad Siniora rejected the move and says that under the constitution he and his cabinet are in temporary power.
 
 
The latest in a series of attempts to find a new president failed on Friday.
 
 
The president is elected by parliament, but a vote was scuppered after the pro-Syrian opposition did not allow the necessary quorum to be achieved. A new vote has been scheduled for 30 November.
 
 
KEY STEPS
 
Vote scheduled 1300 (1100 GMT) Friday but not held. Speaker sets vote for 30 November
 
President Emile Lahoud's term expires 0000 Saturday
 
If the presidency become vacant, constitution says presidential powers passed to PM Fouad Siniora
 
 
 
Views from Beirut
 
Send us your comments 
 
 
Mr Lahoud refused to recognise Mr Siniora's government and analysts say his security move was effectively a call for a state of emergency.
 
 
The US has urged all parties to remain calm and said that under the constitution the Lebanese cabinet should "temporarily assume executive powers and responsibilities until a new president is elected".
 
 
Shortly before midnight, Mr Lahoud, 71, walked out of the Baabda presidential palace as the national anthem played, ending nine years in office.
 
 
AFP news agency quoted him as telling reporters: "If they do not elect a new consensual president, with the required two-thirds majority, we have men who can stand up."
 
 
The BBC's Kim Ghattas in Beirut says that opponents of Mr Lahoud have been celebrating the departure of man they see as the last remnant of Syrian influence over the country.
 
 
She says the country appears to be in the ultimate political limbo, with the rival parties even in disagreement over whether a state of emergency exists.
 
 
'Not valid'
 
 
A few hours before his term was due to end, Mr Lahoud issued a statement via a spokesman, Rafiq Shalala.
 
 
It said the army would have responsibility for maintaining order throughout the country.
 
 
 
Mr Siniora says he should take over temporarily under the constitution
 
 
"There are conditions and risks on the ground that could lead to a state of emergency," Mr Shalala said.
 
 
However, constitutionally Mr Lahoud could not call for a state of emergency without the backing of the government he did not recognise.
 
 
Mr Shalala said the army would "submit the measures it takes to the cabinet once there is one that is constitutional".
 
 
A spokesman for Mr Siniora told AFP news agency: "The statement issued by the general directorate of the president of the republic is not valid and is unconstitutional. It is as if the statement was never issued."
 
 
The head of the army has refused to comment. Gen Michel Suleiman was appointed by Mr Lahoud but has largely sought to keep the military neutral.
 
 
Our correspondent says there are reports that he has agreed to follow the cabinet's orders but that the situation may become clearer in the morning.
 
 
However, she says the one thing everyone does agrees on, at least for now, is that they do not want a return to violence.
 
 
Tension on streets
 
 
The election of a president requires a two-thirds majority, which means that the pro-Western ruling bloc - with only a slim majority - could not force its preferred candidate through parliament.
 
 
The tension was palpable on the streets as the crisis over electing the president came to a head, with the army deployed in force and schools closed, our correspondent says.
 
 
Checkpoints were set up and the ministry of interior suspended all firearm permits until further notice.
 
 
The crisis has raised fears of civil strife, including the possibility of rival administrations.
 
 
The issue has turned into a regional and international affair.
 
 
The US, Russia, Syria and Iran have all been intensely involved and there has been a lot of diplomatic shuttling between Damascus, Moscow, Tehran and Paris ahead of the end of Mr Lahoud's term.
 
 
 
 
E-mail this to a friend  Printable version 
 
 
Bookmark with:
 
Delicious Digg reddit Facebook StumbleUpon
 
What are these?
 
  VIDEO AND AUDIO NEWS
 
Troops on the streets amid fears of unrest
 
 
 
 
 
LEBANON POLITICAL CRISIS
 
 
 
KEY STORIES
 
Lebanese presidency ends in chaos
 
Lebanese fail to elect president
 
Lebanon president deadline looms
 
France decries Lebanon 'blockage'
 
 
 
BACKGROUND AND ANALYSIS
 
  Lebanon impasse
 
Rival factions are unable to come to an agreement on a new president.
 
 
Beirut diary: 12 November
 
Lebanon vote in balance
 
The Lebanese crisis explained
 
 
 
PROFILES
 
Who are the Maronites?
 
Profile: Fouad Siniora
 
Profile: Sheikh Hassan Nasrallah
 
Quick guide: Hezbollah
 
 
 
 
 
RELATED INTERNET LINKS
 
Lebanese presidency
 
Syria Gate (official site)
 
The BBC is not responsible for the content of external internet sites
 
 
 
TOP MIDDLE EAST STORIES
 
Lebanese presidency ends in chaos
 
 
Saudis to attend Mid-East summit
 
 
Israeli 'tried to spy for Iran'
 
 
| News feeds
 
 
 
MOST POPULAR STORIES NOW
 
MOST E-MAILED MOST READ Africa in pictures: 10-16 June
 
Many flee from Philippines storm
 
Chocolate lorry goes to Timbuktu
 
Australians vote to choose leader
 
Death-cheating cat dubbed bionic
 
Most popular now, in detail MOST E-MAILED MOST READ Lebanese presidency ends in chaos
 
Stricken Antarctic ship evacuated
 
Tanzania surgery mix-up man dies
 
Death-cheating cat dubbed bionic
 
Day in pictures
 
Most popular now, in detail
 
 
 
 
FEATURES, VIEWS, ANALYSIS  Shock to system
 
Rape case adds to notoriety of Brazilian prison regime
 
  Black day
 
Zimbabwe rhino killings put breeding project in jeopardy
 
  Day in pictures
 
Some of the most striking images from around the world
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
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BBC Copyright NoticeMMVIIMost Popular Now | The most read story in Australasia is: Lebanese presidency ends in chaos Back to top ^^ Help Privacy and cookies policy News sources About the BBC Contact us 
 
 
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UK versionInternational version|About the versions Low graphics|Accessibility help  One-Minute World News
 
 
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Your news when you want it
 
 
 
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South Asia
 
UK
 
Business
 
Health
 
Science/Nature
 
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Entertainment
 
Also in the news
 
-----------------
 
Video and Audio
 
-----------------
 
Have Your Say
 
In Pictures
 
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Special Reports RELATED BBC SITES
 
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EDITORS' BLOG
 
 
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Pashto
 
Turkish
 
French
 
More
 
  Last Updated: Friday, 23 November 2007, 22:50 GMT 
 
 
E-mail this to a friend  Printable version 
 
 
Lebanese presidency ends in chaos 
 
 
Mr Lahoud left office refusing to recognise the PM's government
 
The term of Lebanon's president has ended with no elected successor and a bitter dispute over who is in power.
 
Before pro-Syrian President Emile Lahoud left the presidential palace at midnight (2200 GMT) he issued an order that the army should take over control.
 
 
But pro-Western PM Fouad Siniora rejected the move and says that under the constitution he and his cabinet are in temporary power.
 
 
The latest in a series of attempts to find a new president failed on Friday.
 
 
The president is elected by parliament, but a vote was scuppered after the pro-Syrian opposition did not allow the necessary quorum to be achieved. A new vote has been scheduled for 30 November.
 
 
KEY STEPS
 
Vote scheduled 1300 (1100 GMT) Friday but not held. Speaker sets vote for 30 November
 
President Emile Lahoud's term expires 0000 Saturday
 
If the presidency become vacant, constitution says presidential powers passed to PM Fouad Siniora
 
 
 
Views from Beirut
 
Send us your comments 
 
 
Mr Lahoud refused to recognise Mr Siniora's government and analysts say his security move was effectively a call for a state of emergency.
 
 
The US has urged all parties to remain calm and said that under the constitution the Lebanese cabinet should "temporarily assume executive powers and responsibilities until a new president is elected".
 
 
Shortly before midnight, Mr Lahoud, 71, walked out of the Baabda presidential palace as the national anthem played, ending nine years in office.
 
 
AFP news agency quoted him as telling reporters: "If they do not elect a new consensual president, with the required two-thirds majority, we have men who can stand up."
 
 
The BBC's Kim Ghattas in Beirut says that opponents of Mr Lahoud have been celebrating the departure of man they see as the last remnant of Syrian influence over the country.
 
 
She says the country appears to be in the ultimate political limbo, with the rival parties even in disagreement over whether a state of emergency exists.
 
 
'Not valid'
 
 
A few hours before his term was due to end, Mr Lahoud issued a statement via a spokesman, Rafiq Shalala.
 
 
It said the army would have responsibility for maintaining order throughout the country.
 
 
 
Mr Siniora says he should take over temporarily under the constitution
 
 
"There are conditions and risks on the ground that could lead to a state of emergency," Mr Shalala said.
 
 
However, constitutionally Mr Lahoud could not call for a state of emergency without the backing of the government he did not recognise.
 
 
Mr Shalala said the army would "submit the measures it takes to the cabinet once there is one that is constitutional".
 
 
A spokesman for Mr Siniora told AFP news agency: "The statement issued by the general directorate of the president of the republic is not valid and is unconstitutional. It is as if the statement was never issued."
 
 
The head of the army has refused to comment. Gen Michel Suleiman was appointed by Mr Lahoud but has largely sought to keep the military neutral.
 
 
Our correspondent says there are reports that he has agreed to follow the cabinet's orders but that the situation may become clearer in the morning.
 
 
However, she says the one thing everyone does agrees on, at least for now, is that they do not want a return to violence.
 
 
Tension on streets
 
 
The election of a president requires a two-thirds majority, which means that the pro-Western ruling bloc - with only a slim majority - could not force its preferred candidate through parliament.
 
 
The tension was palpable on the streets as the crisis over electing the president came to a head, with the army deployed in force and schools closed, our correspondent says.
 
 
Checkpoints were set up and the ministry of interior suspended all firearm permits until further notice.
 
 
The crisis has raised fears of civil strife, including the possibility of rival administrations.
 
 
The issue has turned into a regional and international affair.
 
 
The US, Russia, Syria and Iran have all been intensely involved and there has been a lot of diplomatic shuttling between Damascus, Moscow, Tehran and Paris ahead of the end of Mr Lahoud's term.
 
 
 
 
E-mail this to a friend  Printable version 
 
 
Bookmark with:
 
Delicious Digg reddit Facebook StumbleUpon
 
What are these?
 
  VIDEO AND AUDIO NEWS
 
Troops on the streets amid fears of unrest
 
 
 
 
 
LEBANON POLITICAL CRISIS
 
 
 
KEY STORIES
 
Lebanese presidency ends in chaos
 
Lebanese fail to elect president
 
Lebanon president deadline looms
 
France decries Lebanon 'blockage'
 
 
 
BACKGROUND AND ANALYSIS
 
  Lebanon impasse
 
Rival factions are unable to come to an agreement on a new president.
 
 
Beirut diary: 12 November
 
Lebanon vote in balance
 
The Lebanese crisis explained
 
 
 
PROFILES
 
Who are the Maronites?
 
Profile: Fouad Siniora
 
Profile: Sheikh Hassan Nasrallah
 
Quick guide: Hezbollah
 
 
 
 
 
RELATED INTERNET LINKS
 
Lebanese presidency
 
Syria Gate (official site)
 
The BBC is not responsible for the content of external internet sites
 
 
 
TOP MIDDLE EAST STORIES
 
Lebanese presidency ends in chaos
 
 
Saudis to attend Mid-East summit
 
 
Israeli 'tried to spy for Iran'
 
 
| News feeds
 
 
 
MOST POPULAR STORIES NOW
 
MOST E-MAILED MOST READ Africa in pictures: 10-16 June
 
Many flee from Philippines storm
 
Chocolate lorry goes to Timbuktu
 
Australians vote to choose leader
 
Death-cheating cat dubbed bionic
 
Most popular now, in detail MOST E-MAILED MOST READ Lebanese presidency ends in chaos
 
Stricken Antarctic ship evacuated
 
Tanzania surgery mix-up man dies
 
Death-cheating cat dubbed bionic
 
Day in pictures
 
Most popular now, in detail
 
 
 
 
FEATURES, VIEWS, ANALYSIS  Shock to system
 
Rape case adds to notoriety of Brazilian prison regime
 
  Black day
 
Zimbabwe rhino killings put breeding project in jeopardy
 
  Day in pictures
 
Some of the most striking images from around the world
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
PRODUCTS & SERVICESE-mail news Mobiles Alerts News feeds Podcasts
 
BBC Copyright NoticeMMVIIMost Popular Now | The most read story in Australasia is: Lebanese presidency ends in chaos Back to top ^^ Help Privacy and cookies policy News sources About the BBC Contact us 
 
 
  HomeNewsSportRadioTVWeatherLanguages
 
   
 
 
UK versionInternational version|About the versions Low graphics|Accessibility help  One-Minute World News
 
 
  News services
 
Your news when you want it
 
 
 
News Front Page
 
 
Africa
 
Americas
 
Asia-Pacific
 
Europe
 
Middle East
 
South Asia
 
UK
 
Business
 
Health
 
Science/Nature
 
Technology
 
Entertainment
 
Also in the news
 
-----------------
 
Video and Audio
 
-----------------
 
Have Your Say
 
In Pictures
 
Country Profiles
 
Special Reports RELATED BBC SITES
 
SPORT
 
WEATHER
 
ON THIS DAY
 
EDITORS' BLOG
 
 
LANGUAGES
 
Arabic
 
Persian
 
Pashto
 
Turkish
 
French
 
More
 
  Last Updated: Friday, 23 November 2007, 22:50 GMT 
 
 
E-mail this to a friend  Printable version 
 
 
Lebanese presidency ends in chaos 
 
 
Mr Lahoud left office refusing to recognise the PM's government
 
The term of Lebanon's president has ended with no elected successor and a bitter dispute over who is in power.
 
Before pro-Syrian President Emile Lahoud left the presidential palace at midnight (2200 GMT) he issued an order that the army should take over control.
 
 
But pro-Western PM Fouad Siniora rejected the move and says that under the constitution he and his cabinet are in temporary power.
 
 
The latest in a series of attempts to find a new president failed on Friday.
 
 
The president is elected by parliament, but a vote was scuppered after the pro-Syrian opposition did not allow the necessary quorum to be achieved. A new vote has been scheduled for 30 November.
 
 
KEY STEPS
 
Vote scheduled 1300 (1100 GMT) Friday but not held. Speaker sets vote for 30 November
 
President Emile Lahoud's term expires 0000 Saturday
 
If the presidency become vacant, constitution says presidential powers passed to PM Fouad Siniora
 
 
 
Views from Beirut
 
Send us your comments 
 
 
Mr Lahoud refused to recognise Mr Siniora's government and analysts say his security move was effectively a call for a state of emergency.
 
 
The US has urged all parties to remain calm and said that under the constitution the Lebanese cabinet should "temporarily assume executive powers and responsibilities until a new president is elected".
 
 
Shortly before midnight, Mr Lahoud, 71, walked out of the Baabda presidential palace as the national anthem played, ending nine years in office.
 
 
AFP news agency quoted him as telling reporters: "If they do not elect a new consensual president, with the required two-thirds majority, we have men who can stand up."
 
 
The BBC's Kim Ghattas in Beirut says that opponents of Mr Lahoud have been celebrating the departure of man they see as the last remnant of Syrian influence over the country.
 
 
She says the country appears to be in the ultimate political limbo, with the rival parties even in disagreement over whether a state of emergency exists.
 
 
'Not valid'
 
 
A few hours before his term was due to end, Mr Lahoud issued a statement via a spokesman, Rafiq Shalala.
 
 
It said the army would have responsibility for maintaining order throughout the country.
 
 
 
Mr Siniora says he should take over temporarily under the constitution
 
 
"There are conditions and risks on the ground that could lead to a state of emergency," Mr Shalala said.
 
 
However, constitutionally Mr Lahoud could not call for a state of emergency without the backing of the government he did not recognise.
 
 
Mr Shalala said the army would "submit the measures it takes to the cabinet once there is one that is constitutional".
 
 
A spokesman for Mr Siniora told AFP news agency: "The statement issued by the general directorate of the president of the republic is not valid and is unconstitutional. It is as if the statement was never issued."
 
 
The head of the army has refused to comment. Gen Michel Suleiman was appointed by Mr Lahoud but has largely sought to keep the military neutral.
 
 
Our correspondent says there are reports that he has agreed to follow the cabinet's orders but that the situation may become clearer in the morning.
 
 
However, she says the one thing everyone does agrees on, at least for now, is that they do not want a return to violence.
 
 
Tension on streets
 
 
The election of a president requires a two-thirds majority, which means that the pro-Western ruling bloc - with only a slim majority - could not force its preferred candidate through parliament.
 
 
The tension was palpable on the streets as the crisis over electing the president came to a head, with the army deployed in force and schools closed, our correspondent says.
 
 
Checkpoints were set up and the ministry of interior suspended all firearm permits until further notice.
 
 
The crisis has raised fears of civil strife, including the possibility of rival administrations.
 
 
The issue has turned into a regional and international affair.
 
 
The US, Russia, Syria and Iran have all been intensely involved and there has been a lot of diplomatic shuttling between Damascus, Moscow, Tehran and Paris ahead of the end of Mr Lahoud's term.
 
 
 
 
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What are these?
 
  VIDEO AND AUDIO NEWS
 
Troops on the streets amid fears of unrest
 
 
 
 
 
LEBANON POLITICAL CRISIS
 
 
 
KEY STORIES
 
Lebanese presidency ends in chaos
 
Lebanese fail to elect president
 
Lebanon president deadline looms
 
France decries Lebanon 'blockage'
 
 
 
BACKGROUND AND ANALYSIS
 
  Lebanon impasse
 
Rival factions are unable to come to an agreement on a new president.
 
 
Beirut diary: 12 November
 
Lebanon vote in balance
 
The Lebanese crisis explained
 
 
 
PROFILES
 
Who are the Maronites?
 
Profile: Fouad Siniora
 
Profile: Sheikh Hassan Nasrallah
 
Quick guide: Hezbollah
 
 
 
 
 
RELATED INTERNET LINKS
 
Lebanese presidency
 
Syria Gate (official site)
 
The BBC is not responsible for the content of external internet sites
 
 
 
TOP MIDDLE EAST STORIES
 
Lebanese presidency ends in chaos
 
 
Saudis to attend Mid-East summit
 
 
Israeli 'tried to spy for Iran'
 
 
| News feeds
 
 
 
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MOST E-MAILED MOST READ Africa in pictures: 10-16 June
 
Many flee from Philippines storm
 
Chocolate lorry goes to Timbuktu
 
Australians vote to choose leader
 
Death-cheating cat dubbed bionic
 
Most popular now, in detail MOST E-MAILED MOST READ Lebanese presidency ends in chaos
 
Stricken Antarctic ship evacuated
 
Tanzania surgery mix-up man dies
 
Death-cheating cat dubbed bionic
 
Day in pictures
 
Most popular now, in detail
 
 
 
 
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== Ciutats ==
 
* [[Chanthaburi|Chanthaburi]]
 
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== Altres destins ==
 
 
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{{IsIn|Tailàndia}}
 
L''''este''' és una regió de [[Tailàndia]].
 
 
== Províncias ==
 
* [[Chachoengsao_(província)|Chachoengsao]]
 
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  Last Updated: Friday, 23 November 2007, 22:50 GMT 
 
 
E-mail this to a friend  Printable version 
 
 
Lebanese presidency ends in chaos 
 
 
Mr Lahoud left office refusing to recognise the PM's government
 
The term of Lebanon's president has ended with no elected successor and a bitter dispute over who is in power.
 
Before pro-Syrian President Emile Lahoud left the presidential palace at midnight (2200 GMT) he issued an order that the army should take over control.
 
 
But pro-Western PM Fouad Siniora rejected the move and says that under the constitution he and his cabinet are in temporary power.
 
 
The latest in a series of attempts to find a new president failed on Friday.
 
 
The president is elected by parliament, but a vote was scuppered after the pro-Syrian opposition did not allow the necessary quorum to be achieved. A new vote has been scheduled for 30 November.
 
 
KEY STEPS
 
Vote scheduled 1300 (1100 GMT) Friday but not held. Speaker sets vote for 30 November
 
President Emile Lahoud's term expires 0000 Saturday
 
If the presidency become vacant, constitution says presidential powers passed to PM Fouad Siniora
 
 
 
Views from Beirut
 
Send us your comments 
 
 
Mr Lahoud refused to recognise Mr Siniora's government and analysts say his security move was effectively a call for a state of emergency.
 
 
The US has urged all parties to remain calm and said that under the constitution the Lebanese cabinet should "temporarily assume executive powers and responsibilities until a new president is elected".
 
 
Shortly before midnight, Mr Lahoud, 71, walked out of the Baabda presidential palace as the national anthem played, ending nine years in office.
 
 
AFP news agency quoted him as telling reporters: "If they do not elect a new consensual president, with the required two-thirds majority, we have men who can stand up."
 
 
The BBC's Kim Ghattas in Beirut says that opponents of Mr Lahoud have been celebrating the departure of man they see as the last remnant of Syrian influence over the country.
 
 
She says the country appears to be in the ultimate political limbo, with the rival parties even in disagreement over whether a state of emergency exists.
 
 
'Not valid'
 
 
A few hours before his term was due to end, Mr Lahoud issued a statement via a spokesman, Rafiq Shalala.
 
 
It said the army would have responsibility for maintaining order throughout the country.
 
 
 
Mr Siniora says he should take over temporarily under the constitution
 
 
"There are conditions and risks on the ground that could lead to a state of emergency," Mr Shalala said.
 
 
However, constitutionally Mr Lahoud could not call for a state of emergency without the backing of the government he did not recognise.
 
 
Mr Shalala said the army would "submit the measures it takes to the cabinet once there is one that is constitutional".
 
 
A spokesman for Mr Siniora told AFP news agency: "The statement issued by the general directorate of the president of the republic is not valid and is unconstitutional. It is as if the statement was never issued."
 
 
The head of the army has refused to comment. Gen Michel Suleiman was appointed by Mr Lahoud but has largely sought to keep the military neutral.
 
 
Our correspondent says there are reports that he has agreed to follow the cabinet's orders but that the situation may become clearer in the morning.
 
 
However, she says the one thing everyone does agrees on, at least for now, is that they do not want a return to violence.
 
 
Tension on streets
 
 
The election of a president requires a two-thirds majority, which means that the pro-Western ruling bloc - with only a slim majority - could not force its preferred candidate through parliament.
 
 
The tension was palpable on the streets as the crisis over electing the president came to a head, with the army deployed in force and schools closed, our correspondent says.
 
 
Checkpoints were set up and the ministry of interior suspended all firearm permits until further notice.
 
 
The crisis has raised fears of civil strife, including the possibility of rival administrations.
 
 
The issue has turned into a regional and international affair.
 
 
The US, Russia, Syria and Iran have all been intensely involved and there has been a lot of diplomatic shuttling between Damascus, Moscow, Tehran and Paris ahead of the end of Mr Lahoud's term.
 
 
 
 
E-mail this to a friend  Printable version 
 
 
Bookmark with:
 
Delicious Digg reddit Facebook StumbleUpon
 
What are these?
 
  VIDEO AND AUDIO NEWS
 
Troops on the streets amid fears of unrest
 
 
 
 
 
LEBANON POLITICAL CRISIS
 
 
 
KEY STORIES
 
Lebanese presidency ends in chaos
 
Lebanese fail to elect president
 
Lebanon president deadline looms
 
France decries Lebanon 'blockage'
 
 
 
BACKGROUND AND ANALYSIS
 
  Lebanon impasse
 
Rival factions are unable to come to an agreement on a new president.
 
 
Beirut diary: 12 November
 
Lebanon vote in balance
 
The Lebanese crisis explained
 
 
 
PROFILES
 
Who are the Maronites?
 
Profile: Fouad Siniora
 
Profile: Sheikh Hassan Nasrallah
 
Quick guide: Hezbollah
 
 
 
 
 
RELATED INTERNET LINKS
 
Lebanese presidency
 
Syria Gate (official site)
 
The BBC is not responsible for the content of external internet sites
 
 
 
TOP MIDDLE EAST STORIES
 
Lebanese presidency ends in chaos
 
 
Saudis to attend Mid-East summit
 
 
Israeli 'tried to spy for Iran'
 
 
| News feeds
 
 
 
MOST POPULAR STORIES NOW
 
MOST E-MAILED MOST READ Africa in pictures: 10-16 June
 
Many flee from Philippines storm
 
Chocolate lorry goes to Timbuktu
 
Australians vote to choose leader
 
Death-cheating cat dubbed bionic
 
Most popular now, in detail MOST E-MAILED MOST READ Lebanese presidency ends in chaos
 
Stricken Antarctic ship evacuated
 
Tanzania surgery mix-up man dies
 
Death-cheating cat dubbed bionic
 
Day in pictures
 
Most popular now, in detail
 
 
 
 
FEATURES, VIEWS, ANALYSIS  Shock to system
 
Rape case adds to notoriety of Brazilian prison regime
 
  Black day
 
Zimbabwe rhino killings put breeding project in jeopardy
 
  Day in pictures
 
Some of the most striking images from around the world
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
PRODUCTS & SERVICESE-mail news Mobiles Alerts News feeds Podcasts
 
BBC Copyright NoticeMMVIIMost Popular Now | The most read story in Australasia is: Lebanese presidency ends in chaos Back to top ^^ Help Privacy and cookies policy News sources About the BBC Contact us 
 
 
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UK versionInternational version|About the versions Low graphics|Accessibility help  One-Minute World News
 
 
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Your news when you want it
 
 
 
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Business
 
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Entertainment
 
Also in the news
 
-----------------
 
Video and Audio
 
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Have Your Say
 
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French
 
More
 
  Last Updated: Friday, 23 November 2007, 22:50 GMT 
 
 
E-mail this to a friend  Printable version 
 
 
Lebanese presidency ends in chaos 
 
 
Mr Lahoud left office refusing to recognise the PM's government
 
The term of Lebanon's president has ended with no elected successor and a bitter dispute over who is in power.
 
Before pro-Syrian President Emile Lahoud left the presidential palace at midnight (2200 GMT) he issued an order that the army should take over control.
 
 
But pro-Western PM Fouad Siniora rejected the move and says that under the constitution he and his cabinet are in temporary power.
 
 
The latest in a series of attempts to find a new president failed on Friday.
 
 
The president is elected by parliament, but a vote was scuppered after the pro-Syrian opposition did not allow the necessary quorum to be achieved. A new vote has been scheduled for 30 November.
 
 
KEY STEPS
 
Vote scheduled 1300 (1100 GMT) Friday but not held. Speaker sets vote for 30 November
 
President Emile Lahoud's term expires 0000 Saturday
 
If the presidency become vacant, constitution says presidential powers passed to PM Fouad Siniora
 
 
 
Views from Beirut
 
Send us your comments 
 
 
Mr Lahoud refused to recognise Mr Siniora's government and analysts say his security move was effectively a call for a state of emergency.
 
 
The US has urged all parties to remain calm and said that under the constitution the Lebanese cabinet should "temporarily assume executive powers and responsibilities until a new president is elected".
 
 
Shortly before midnight, Mr Lahoud, 71, walked out of the Baabda presidential palace as the national anthem played, ending nine years in office.
 
 
AFP news agency quoted him as telling reporters: "If they do not elect a new consensual president, with the required two-thirds majority, we have men who can stand up."
 
 
The BBC's Kim Ghattas in Beirut says that opponents of Mr Lahoud have been celebrating the departure of man they see as the last remnant of Syrian influence over the country.
 
 
She says the country appears to be in the ultimate political limbo, with the rival parties even in disagreement over whether a state of emergency exists.
 
 
'Not valid'
 
 
A few hours before his term was due to end, Mr Lahoud issued a statement via a spokesman, Rafiq Shalala.
 
 
It said the army would have responsibility for maintaining order throughout the country.
 
 
 
Mr Siniora says he should take over temporarily under the constitution
 
 
"There are conditions and risks on the ground that could lead to a state of emergency," Mr Shalala said.
 
 
However, constitutionally Mr Lahoud could not call for a state of emergency without the backing of the government he did not recognise.
 
 
Mr Shalala said the army would "submit the measures it takes to the cabinet once there is one that is constitutional".
 
 
A spokesman for Mr Siniora told AFP news agency: "The statement issued by the general directorate of the president of the republic is not valid and is unconstitutional. It is as if the statement was never issued."
 
 
The head of the army has refused to comment. Gen Michel Suleiman was appointed by Mr Lahoud but has largely sought to keep the military neutral.
 
 
Our correspondent says there are reports that he has agreed to follow the cabinet's orders but that the situation may become clearer in the morning.
 
 
However, she says the one thing everyone does agrees on, at least for now, is that they do not want a return to violence.
 
 
Tension on streets
 
 
The election of a president requires a two-thirds majority, which means that the pro-Western ruling bloc - with only a slim majority - could not force its preferred candidate through parliament.
 
 
The tension was palpable on the streets as the crisis over electing the president came to a head, with the army deployed in force and schools closed, our correspondent says.
 
 
Checkpoints were set up and the ministry of interior suspended all firearm permits until further notice.
 
 
The crisis has raised fears of civil strife, including the possibility of rival administrations.
 
 
The issue has turned into a regional and international affair.
 
 
The US, Russia, Syria and Iran have all been intensely involved and there has been a lot of diplomatic shuttling between Damascus, Moscow, Tehran and Paris ahead of the end of Mr Lahoud's term.
 
 
 
 
E-mail this to a friend  Printable version 
 
 
Bookmark with:
 
Delicious Digg reddit Facebook StumbleUpon
 
What are these?
 
  VIDEO AND AUDIO NEWS
 
Troops on the streets amid fears of unrest
 
 
 
 
 
LEBANON POLITICAL CRISIS
 
 
 
KEY STORIES
 
Lebanese presidency ends in chaos
 
Lebanese fail to elect president
 
Lebanon president deadline looms
 
France decries Lebanon 'blockage'
 
 
 
BACKGROUND AND ANALYSIS
 
  Lebanon impasse
 
Rival factions are unable to come to an agreement on a new president.
 
 
Beirut diary: 12 November
 
Lebanon vote in balance
 
The Lebanese crisis explained
 
 
 
PROFILES
 
Who are the Maronites?
 
Profile: Fouad Siniora
 
Profile: Sheikh Hassan Nasrallah
 
Quick guide: Hezbollah
 
 
 
 
 
RELATED INTERNET LINKS
 
Lebanese presidency
 
Syria Gate (official site)
 
The BBC is not responsible for the content of external internet sites
 
 
 
TOP MIDDLE EAST STORIES
 
Lebanese presidency ends in chaos
 
 
Saudis to attend Mid-East summit
 
 
Israeli 'tried to spy for Iran'
 
 
| News feeds
 
 
 
MOST POPULAR STORIES NOW
 
MOST E-MAILED MOST READ Africa in pictures: 10-16 June
 
Many flee from Philippines storm
 
Chocolate lorry goes to Timbuktu
 
Australians vote to choose leader
 
Death-cheating cat dubbed bionic
 
Most popular now, in detail MOST E-MAILED MOST READ Lebanese presidency ends in chaos
 
Stricken Antarctic ship evacuated
 
Tanzania surgery mix-up man dies
 
Death-cheating cat dubbed bionic
 
Day in pictures
 
Most popular now, in detail
 
 
 
 
FEATURES, VIEWS, ANALYSIS  Shock to system
 
Rape case adds to notoriety of Brazilian prison regime
 
  Black day
 
Zimbabwe rhino killings put breeding project in jeopardy
 
  Day in pictures
 
Some of the most striking images from around the world
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
PRODUCTS & SERVICESE-mail news Mobiles Alerts News feeds Podcasts
 
BBC Copyright NoticeMMVIIMost Popular Now | The most read story in Australasia is: Lebanese presidency ends in chaos Back to top ^^ Help Privacy and cookies policy News sources About the BBC Contact us 
 
 
  HomeNewsSportRadioTVWeatherLanguages
 
   
 
 
UK versionInternational version|About the versions Low graphics|Accessibility help  One-Minute World News
 
 
  News services
 
Your news when you want it
 
 
 
News Front Page
 
 
Africa
 
Americas
 
Asia-Pacific
 
Europe
 
Middle East
 
South Asia
 
UK
 
Business
 
Health
 
Science/Nature
 
Technology
 
Entertainment
 
Also in the news
 
-----------------
 
Video and Audio
 
-----------------
 
Have Your Say
 
In Pictures
 
Country Profiles
 
Special Reports RELATED BBC SITES
 
SPORT
 
WEATHER
 
ON THIS DAY
 
EDITORS' BLOG
 
 
LANGUAGES
 
Arabic
 
Persian
 
Pashto
 
Turkish
 
French
 
More
 
  Last Updated: Friday, 23 November 2007, 22:50 GMT 
 
 
E-mail this to a friend  Printable version 
 
 
Lebanese presidency ends in chaos 
 
 
Mr Lahoud left office refusing to recognise the PM's government
 
The term of Lebanon's president has ended with no elected successor and a bitter dispute over who is in power.
 
Before pro-Syrian President Emile Lahoud left the presidential palace at midnight (2200 GMT) he issued an order that the army should take over control.
 
 
But pro-Western PM Fouad Siniora rejected the move and says that under the constitution he and his cabinet are in temporary power.
 
 
The latest in a series of attempts to find a new president failed on Friday.
 
 
The president is elected by parliament, but a vote was scuppered after the pro-Syrian opposition did not allow the necessary quorum to be achieved. A new vote has been scheduled for 30 November.
 
 
KEY STEPS
 
Vote scheduled 1300 (1100 GMT) Friday but not held. Speaker sets vote for 30 November
 
President Emile Lahoud's term expires 0000 Saturday
 
If the presidency become vacant, constitution says presidential powers passed to PM Fouad Siniora
 
 
 
Views from Beirut
 
Send us your comments 
 
 
Mr Lahoud refused to recognise Mr Siniora's government and analysts say his security move was effectively a call for a state of emergency.
 
 
The US has urged all parties to remain calm and said that under the constitution the Lebanese cabinet should "temporarily assume executive powers and responsibilities until a new president is elected".
 
 
Shortly before midnight, Mr Lahoud, 71, walked out of the Baabda presidential palace as the national anthem played, ending nine years in office.
 
 
AFP news agency quoted him as telling reporters: "If they do not elect a new consensual president, with the required two-thirds majority, we have men who can stand up."
 
 
The BBC's Kim Ghattas in Beirut says that opponents of Mr Lahoud have been celebrating the departure of man they see as the last remnant of Syrian influence over the country.
 
 
She says the country appears to be in the ultimate political limbo, with the rival parties even in disagreement over whether a state of emergency exists.
 
 
'Not valid'
 
 
A few hours before his term was due to end, Mr Lahoud issued a statement via a spokesman, Rafiq Shalala.
 
 
It said the army would have responsibility for maintaining order throughout the country.
 
 
 
Mr Siniora says he should take over temporarily under the constitution
 
 
"There are conditions and risks on the ground that could lead to a state of emergency," Mr Shalala said.
 
 
However, constitutionally Mr Lahoud could not call for a state of emergency without the backing of the government he did not recognise.
 
 
Mr Shalala said the army would "submit the measures it takes to the cabinet once there is one that is constitutional".
 
 
A spokesman for Mr Siniora told AFP news agency: "The statement issued by the general directorate of the president of the republic is not valid and is unconstitutional. It is as if the statement was never issued."
 
 
The head of the army has refused to comment. Gen Michel Suleiman was appointed by Mr Lahoud but has largely sought to keep the military neutral.