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User:Kurkoski/Sandbox 2

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See & Do[edit]

Lanterns at Chingodo, Asakusa

Although there is no must-see attraction in Tokyo, perhaps because so many things are competeing with each other, you can feel the energy of the city.

Asakusa is home to the oldest temple in Tokyo, and in front Nakamise is a long shopping arcade filled with little shops selling souveniers.

Meiji Shrine, on the other hand is comparatively new, being built in the late 1800s to honor the emporer Meiji, and is located in the expansive Yoyogi park.

The Imperial Palace in Chiyoda, the heart of Tokyo, is indeed the home of the emperor. The surrounding gardens are expansive and free, but the palace itself is not generally open to the public.

Tokyo has a wide assortment of museums, from world-class art museums to small galleries that are essentially the public display of an enthusists personal collection. The best collection of musseums is in Ueno Park. The impressive Mori Gallery in Roppongi, and Bunkamura in Shibuya are good bets for special exhibitions. The Kite Museum is a quirky collection of traditional Japanese kites.

Viewing platforms abound. The best bet is the Tokyo Metropolitan Government Building in Shinjuku which is free and open late. Better known is Tokyo Tower in Roppongi and Tokyo World Trade Building in Hamamatsucho.

A way to take a load off your feet while moving to the next destianation is to take a boat ride on the Sumida River. Boats leave from places such as Hamamatsucho, and drop you off in Asakusa, within walking distance from the temple and shopping district.

Parks. Surprising oasis in the city of neon and concrete.

Shopping. Ginza, Omotesando, Harajuku, Akehabara (or see Shopping section)

Karaoke places are easily found near stations. Nearly all places have karaoke box where you and your friends get a private room where you can sign your heart out. You pay by the hour, and all-you-can drink or all-you-can-eat-and-drink plans are usually avaialble. Most places have a reasonable selection of English-language songs, usually found in the back of the phonebook-sized song list book.

Tokyo with Children[edit]

  • Inogashira Koen and Ghbili
  • Go to an amusement park such as Tokyo Disneyland or the more Japanese Sanrio Puroland (in Tama), home to more Hello Kittys than you can imagine.

Tokyo for Free[edit]

  • Viewing platform on the Tokyo Metro Government Building
  • Emperial Palace and the museum inside
  • Some other museum in a department store.

http://www.jnto.go.jp/eng/TTP/SI/PDF/pg-813.pdf

Late Night Tourist[edit]

  • Viewing platform on the Tokyo Metro Government Building
  • Mori Art Museum and Viewing platform in Roppongi
  • While the business district around Tokyo station becomes a ghosttown after working hours, Shinjuku, particularly Kabukicho and Shibuya seems to never sleep. There's plenty of bright lights, people watching and exploring to do.

Western Tokyo[edit]

  • In the spring, take a boatride in Kichijoji's lovely Inogashira Park, and afterwards visit the Ghibli Studios Museum (well-known for their amazing movies, like Spirited Away, and Princess Mononoke), but you will need to buy tickets for these in advance at a Lawson convenience store.
  • Jindai Botanical Gardens

Previous[edit]

Tokyo has a vast array of sights, but the first items on the agenda of most visitors are the temples of Asakusa, the gardens of the Imperial Palace (in Chiyoda) and the Meiji Shrine (in Harajuku).

If you're looking for a viewing platform, the Tokyo Tower is the best known choice. It costs money to go up, however. A much better choice - while not quite as high - is the Tokyo City Hall in Shinjuku. Its twin towers have viewing platforms that are absolutely free, and still offer a great view over Tokyo. A recent addition to the viewing platforms around Tokyo is Tokyo City View in Roppongi Hills, Roppongi.

The city is dotted with museums, large and small, which center on every possible interest from pens to antique clocks to traditional and modern arts. At ¥500 to ¥1,000 or more, entrance fees can add up quickly. Many of the largest museums are clustered around Ueno.

Do[edit][add listing]

  • Take a boat ride on the Sumida River.
  • Enjoy a soak in a local "sento" or public bath. Or one of the onsen theme parks such as LaQua at the Tokyo Dome (Taito) or Oedo Onsen Monogatari in Odaiba.
  • Check out the hip and young crowd at Harajuku's Takeshita-Dori (Takeshita Street) or the more grown up Omotesando.
  • In the spring, take a boatride in Kichijoji's lovely Inogashira Park, and afterwards visit the Ghibli Studios Museum (well-known for their amazing movies, like Spirited Away, and Princess Mononoke), but you will need to buy tickets for these in advance at a Lawson convenience store.
  • Go to an amusement park such as Tokyo Disneyland or the more Japanese Sanrio Puroland (in Tama), home to more Hello Kittys than you can imagine.

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