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Talk:Vang Vieng

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MAP PierrB (talk) 03:54, 2 April 2013 (EDT)

Israelis in Vang Vieng[edit]

I'm curious why Vang Vieng appears to have such a huge number of Israeli visitors. I never saw anything like it in Vientiane, but I never made it to Luang Prabang so I don't know if it's the same up there. Any guesses? Kibbutzers on holiday, perhaps? Ewlyahoocom 12:37, 12 August 2006 (EDT)

We'll it's a pretty popular stop on the backpacker trail, just because it's so chill I think. I didn't notice it in Luang Prabang, but maybe you were just there at the same time as a large group? Or summer vacation or something? I wonder if it's featured heavily in Israeli guidebooks. Maj 12:49, 12 August 2006 (EDT)
well israelis go everywhere where you can buy easily drugs, and that`s vang vieng.91.49.209.123 14:53, 25 December 2007 (EST)armin_stahl@gmx.de

Bit of an easy generalization there isn't it? My experience of Vang Vieng was that there was a whole mix of ethnicitys. Buying drugs in Vang Vieng is only easy with the traditional drugs of the area, ie. Pot, Magic Mushrooms and Opium. Trying to buy cocaine or anything else is very dangerous.

Do - tubing[edit]

I am a little concerned about the theme and tone of the current listing describing tubing activities. The consumption of alcohol and engagement in water activities including tubing, or even just old fashioned swimming is not exactly a 'safe' activity at any stretch of the imagination, especially if heavily intoxicated. I get the impression that that may be somewhat of a theme at this location and accordingly I have inserted a very minor comment "for reasons of safety and common sense consider avoiding alcohol completely if entering the water". However maybe we need to consider the appropriateness of detailing the drinking and tubing whilst intoxicated activities as something to do whilst effected by alcohol. If that is what is happening there...getting drunk and riding a tube down a river then so be it, however the article listing is by default promoting a decidedly foolish activity. Does anyone think a 'warning', possibly even a basic 'warning box' is appropriate here or perhaps my recent edit is quite enough to express a need for restraint and caution. felix 02:13, 13 January 2011 (EST)

Tubing and drinking is a major activity here. You take a tube, roll down the river, then drink some at a bar, hit the river again up to the next bar. That's how it goes. I think the traveler him/herself should be able to decide whether its too dangerous or not. I think it's a bit captain obvious, but we could provide a small warning somewhere. --globe-trotter 02:22, 13 January 2011 (EST)
Yes, I most certainly agree on the Capt. Obvious thing, my only concern is that we 'appear' to be somewhat promoting the drink and tube thing by default and it also seems to be the general theme of the place. I subsequently added the below to the Stay safe section. It seems to entirely contradict the rest of the article, I guess that is the idea though. Let me know what you think. felix 02:35, 13 January 2011 (EST)

===Water sports and alcohol do not mix===

Drinking alcohol or consuming drugs then entering the water and swimming or tubing may seem like a great idea but common sense should prevail. If you have been drinking alcohol or consuming drugs do not enter the water. To do so places both yourself and others at risk. Just because a lot of people are doing it does not make it any less dangerous, indeed it probably just enhances the risk

I don't think it is dangerous to get into the water after a beer. Even a couple of beers, I don't see a big harm, as long as you can swim. But of course, one must know its own limits, and that differs per person. So to say they "dont mix" or should not be done I think is far-stretched, but we could say that one has to be careful and know his/her own limits. --globe-trotter 09:04, 13 January 2011 (EST)
If there is a consensus that my 'cautioning' is over the top then I do not object to it being toned down or taken out completely. However I do think that the sort of activities the article is promoting are a bit risky (heavy drinking and tubing) but maybe I am just feeling sensitive as there have been some river drownings lately near where I live, alcohol was not involved, the water was sufficient on it's own. As mentioned above a caution it is a bit captain obvious but as the article is somewhat promoting risky behaviour some sort of caution may be appropriate. If anyone thinks the one I put in is over the top just take it out. felix 13:49, 13 January 2011 (EST)
I can't even imagine tubing without a cooler of beer attached to my tube by rope. (Tubing isn't really a "sport" that you would do on anything but a really lazy river.) --Peter Talk 14:08, 13 January 2011 (EST)

I think a warning box with the phrase "Be aware that 2 people on average are killed every month on the Nam Song River, and the tubing bars along it's banks. See Stay Safe for more information" would be well in order. The number of young travellers killed on this river (22 last year) makes such a warning warranted in my view. The last death occured on Jan 10th, and there will probably be another before the month is over. It should be noted as well that the hazard comes from the dangerous mix of alcohol + 10m high ziplines/jumping platforms + water + 3rd world medical facilities. The river it's self is not that dangerous. The guy who died on the 10th was taken to the "hospital" in a tuk-tuk. For those who don't know, floating down the river with a couple of beers is not how 99% of thosing tubing the Nam Song drink anymore. The reality is much closer to college party / frat house binge drinking, the bars even give free shots of the local Whiskey to anyone who buys a beer, goes off the zip line, or even just walks into the bar. The kids doing this get unbelievably drunk, and fast. Also worth noting that tubing drives the town's economy, and the locals all experience a sudden loss of english skills when asked about river fatalities. I've been in town since the 10th, and only found out the details of the accident from international news sites, and a couple of western rock climbing and kayaking guides.CanadianGuy 22:03, 19 January 2012 (EST)

Good idea but keep it brief and to the point. I put some warnings into this article a long time ago but there were some objections and they quickly got diluted and were eventually removed completely by a series of edits. I somehow doubt anyone will take any notice of it any warnings in the article and the dangers of the sort of silliness that goes on there really should be more than apparently to visitors there. The Warning Box is meant to be used for "non-obvious dangers to life and limb" I really think this danger is pretty obvious. Maybe a caution box is the best thing for this, as it is not a danger arising from a war, natural disaster or similar event. There is some effort being made site-wide to limit the use of the warning boxes to things of a more catastrophic nature. -- felix 13:38, 20 January 2012 (EST)

SCAM!![edit]

We hired small motorbike in Vang Vieng, Laos from MR TEEP, for 40,000 Kip for the day. We rode to Kaeng Nyui waterfalls, which were 6 Km from town down a bumpy dirt road. We parked the bike next to the ticket kiosk, and when we returned about 30 minutes later, the woman in the kiosk pointed out that our front tyre was flat. She did not speak English, but by gestures offered to phone Mr Teep, which we were grateful for, as our mobiles did not work in Laos. Having spoken to MR TEEP she passed her phone to me, and he explained that he would contact the repair man, who would bring a replacement innertube out and that I would have to pay 50,000 Kip for it. I told him that I had examined the tyre and could see nothing wrong with it and it hopefully only needed pumping up. To which he said that if that was the case, then I would have to pay 2000 or 3000 Kip. The repair man arrived a few minutes later with a sack with a pump and two different size inner tubes and a few tyre levers. He went to speak to the kiosk woman and so I undid his sack and took out the pump. He came across and protested and showed me the new inner tube. I asked how much, and he wrote 50,000 on his hand. I said "No" and attached the pump and pumped up the tyre. I disconnected the pump and listened for air coming out. It seemed OK. So I decided to ride back to the town and check the tyre again then, knowing that I would probably be able to get it pumped up there. I offered the repairman 3000, but he wanted 5000, which I paid him. When we got back to town the tyre was OK, and we realised that the woman at the kiosk must have let the tyre down, so that the repairman could swap a perfectly OK tube for an extortionate charge!!! We used the bike for rest of the day, with no problems. Being in the middle of nowhere without a pump and not speaking the language, most people may well have paid up and been non-the-wiser. I also feel sure that MR TEEP must have been in on it! Otherwise he would have been suspicious of the number of flat tyres being reported to him by the kiosk woman!! Don't hire from MR TEEP and more importantly do not park your bike near the ticket kiosk. Other people had taken their motorbikes nearer to the falls, where there is more parking.

Organic farm[edit]

There was some controversy on the organic farm listing on this page so I removed them for now to keep the NPOV. Someone with knowledge of this case please elaborate if its useful for the travelers to have this listing on the site anymore. --OVK (talk) 11:04, 28 November 2013 (EST)

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