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Talk:Proof of what you already own

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As the only contributor to this article, am concerned that this short but key piece might be deleted because it's an outline (really?) and short (but complete for it's title, though lacking content for other than U.S. citizens...I'm not qualified to develop such content).

For those who take extensive valuables (e.g., jewelry, late-model cameras/computers) with them internationally, the process described can save a considerable sum (duty assessment) and embarrassment at customs processing as they return. Perhaps it needs to be referenced from or inserted in articles that address traveling to foreign countries; perhaps we need a generalized article on that topic per se. Regards Hennejohn 20:20, 2 January 2012 (EST)

I agree it is on shaky ground. The article name is odd, the information that is common to all countries verges on the obvious., and I think it is being overly preachy. I could summarise the whole thing, by "It's worth keeping the receipts for any items you purchased before leaving that are commonly purchased duty-free so you aren't incorrectly charged duty on your return." --Inas 21:53, 2 January 2012 (EST)
I concur with the unusual brevity of this piece and its clumsy title...perhaps "Avoiding Duty Costs" would be better, and would introduce a wider-spectrum, more useful article. Believe this article already has links to it from at least two articles. Must hope someone else knows how to find all those articles to correct broken linkages. Perhaps pasting it in "Fundamentals of flying" and "Cruise ships" would be a good start. Would also be willing to draft a broader article such as above. Regret, I'm unqualified to find all articles that may reference this one...or to re-direct existing linkages and/or copy in-place.
Do have extensive personal experience with seeing others encounter considerable delays at customs screening as they return to their home-country. In most cases, they had no receipts; and often when they did, their receipts (from merchants within their country) had undependable standing for customs purposes. In at least two cases, couples incurred duty fees of several hundred dollars...after officials relented on levying even larger fines for non-declaration of dutiable items. Yes, there are folks who take major valuables with them...especially on cruises. Regards, Hennejohn 15:47, 11 April 2012 (EDT)

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