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Talk:Alquezar

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head to Barbastro[edit]

A comment re this edit:

Was:

> Looks like a locals-oriented food shop, but locals consider it extremely expensive and tourists-oriented--and head to Barbastro to buy food.

Now:

>but locals consider it extremely expensive and tourist-oriented. Head to Barbastro to buy food.

This edit changes the meaning: I only meant to say that locals prefer to buy food at Barbastro, not to recommend travellers to do so as well (as it's impractical in most cases). How can we preserve my original idea? --DenisYurkin 12:15, 19 December 2007 (EST)


Stewed meats[edit]

A comment re this edit:

Was:

> Stewed meats (rabbit, partridge, veal) are the most successful in what can be found in local restaurants.

Now:

> Stewed rabbit, partridge, and veal are the most commonly found dishes in local restaurants.

Similarly, my original meaning was not only that these can be found, but that in most restaurants in the town these meals are really good most of the times. How can we reflect this meaning? --DenisYurkin 12:15, 19 December 2007 (EST)

How about "Stewed rabbit, partridge, and veal dishes are the best bet in most local restaurants." ? Texugo 22:13, 23 December 2007 (EST)
This phrasing looks correct to me, as long as the "best bet" idiom doesn't confuse non-native English speakers. -- Bill-on-the-Hill 22:36, 23 December 2007 (EST)
Now it does preserves the meaning, so it's definitely better than your previous edition. I will update the article with it. --DenisYurkin 02:13, 24 December 2007 (EST)

more comments on Texugo edits[edit]

On this edit:

Was: Progressive discounts for second+ activity.

Now: Progressive discounts for the experienced.

I originally meant that you get higher and higher discount as you come for 2nd / 3rd / 4th activity with the same operator during your stay. Experience level of a client doesn't matter. How to make the sentence to state this clear? --DenisYurkin 15:44, 6 January 2008 (EST)

Let's try "progressive discounts for repeat customers." Texugo 19:43, 6 January 2008 (EST)
Agreed; will use your phrasing. --DenisYurkin 03:00, 8 January 2008 (EST)

Was: Looks like a locals-oriented food shop, but locals consider it extremely expensive and tourist-oriented.

Now: Looks like a locally-oriented food shop, but locals consider it extremely expensive and tourist-oriented.

I meant that for a traveler, this shop looks like its primary clientèle are residents of Alquezar. However, it is not--which I want to stress here. Does 'locally-oriented' reflect the same idea? --DenisYurkin 15:44, 6 January 2008 (EST)

I think this one is OK, but if you want to make it absolutely clear you could say
"The food shop appears to be oriented towards locals, but the locals consider it extremely expensive and tourist-oriented."
Texugo 19:43, 6 January 2008 (EST)
Agreed; will use your phrasing. --DenisYurkin 03:00, 8 January 2008 (EST)

Was: Soup with beans and pork is quite controversial.

Now: The soup with beans and pork is quite famous.

By 'controversial' I meant that many people who try these dishes will not like it, while many others will. I agree that 'controversial' is not the best term to describe this, but "quite famous" is radically different. What word would best reflect the intended meaning? --DenisYurkin 15:44, 6 January 2008 (EST)

I see. I wasn't sure what you meant by 'controversial'. It sounded like the soup was somehow either causing verbal arguments or was likely to appear on the front page of the tabloids. Let's try
"You'll either love the pork and bean soup or you'll hate it."
Texugo 19:43, 6 January 2008 (EST)
I have a problem with this, maybe because I'm not a native speaker. To me, "You'll either love it or you'll have" is like "it's either true or false"--giving no information. Maybe we can find something like "Some people will love it, but definitely not everyone"? --DenisYurkin 03:00, 8 January 2008 (EST)
"You'll either love it or you'll hate it" is almost a set expression in English for this kind of thing, so I really don't see a problem with it, but if you insist, you can try "Some will love the pork and bean soup, but it's not for everyone.", although I fail to see how that provides any more information than what I suggested. Texugo 23:09, 24 January 2008 (EST)
Thanks, I used it--it's much easier to live with, at least for me personally :-) --DenisYurkin 01:39, 25 January 2008 (EST)

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