Help Wikitravel grow by contributing to an article! Learn how.
New users, please see Help or go to the Pub to ask questions.

North Rhine-Westphalia

From Wikitravel
Germany : Western Germany : North Rhine-Westphalia
Jump to: navigation, search

North Rhine-Westphalia (Nordrhein-Westfalen) is a state in the northwest of Germany.

Regions[edit]

Cities[edit]

Other destinations[edit]

Understand[edit]

North Rhine-Westphalia (short version NRW) is a German state. It was created in 1946 by the British military administration, who combined the former province of Westphalia and the norther parts of the Rhine province into a new state. 1947 the former state of Lippe was merge in as well. This move was driven by the desire to have the industrially important Ruhr area locate within a single state.

This created a state with pronounced cultural differences. The down-to-earth, somewhat tight-lipped Westphalians contrast with the cheerful and outgoing Rhinelanders; and the Ruhr Area has a working-class identity of its own. Knowing this makes it easier for a visitor to understand some attitudes, furthermore handle it like the locals: take it lightly.


North Rhine-Westphalia has about 18 million inhabitants, which makes it the most populous state in Germany and the fourth largest in area. 34 of the 100 largest companies in Germany and 9 of the 100 largest European companies have their headquarter in North Rhine-Westphalia. The Rhine-Ruhr area, ranging from Köln and Bonn to Duisburg and Dortmund, is one of Europe's largest metropolian regions, with over 11 million inhabitants. It contains the state capital Dusseldorf, as well as Cologne, the most populated city.

Towards the north, the state has a more rural character, with flat farmland and an expertise in horse breeding. The southern part is mountainous, up to 1000 m above sea level. Its numerous brooks turned the wheels of numerous handicrafts before the steam engine was invented. The mountainous areas towards the south, such as the Sauerland, are also know for their scenic nature and are a popular weekend retreat.

The Ruhr area (Ruhrgebiet), which ranges from Dortmund to Duisburg, has been the center of Germany's heavy industry since the early 20th century. Even today, the region has a distinct no-nonsense working class identity. Due to the industry's need for workers, immigrants have always been attracted to the Ruhrgebiet - first coming from Poland and then, after the war, from southern Europe and Turkey. Towards the end of the 20th century, coal mining gradually ended and heavy industry declined. The economic turmoil and need to refocus can still be felt today, with the region moving from heavy industry to high tech.

Talk[edit]

Get in[edit]

The most important airports are Düsseldorf (IATA: DUS), Germany's 3rd largest airport, and Cologne (IATA: CGN). Budget flights are also available to Dortmund (IATA: DTM). Frankfurt (IATA: FRA) is connected via a high-speed rail and can be reached in less than an hour from cologne. Also, there are buses that connect the budget airport Frankfurt-Hahn (IATA: FFH) with Cologne, but these will take longer.

The major cities have high-speed train links with the rest of Germany and Europe, and it is a major connection point for the motorways (Autobahn).

Since the liberation of the bus market, there are also long-distance buses to other parts of Germany.

Get around[edit]

Public transport is excellent in the Rhine-Rhur metropolitan area, with buses and trains taking you virtually everywhere. Thanks to a unified ticketing system you can go door-to-door anywhere in the state with a single ticket: You need only one ticket for local, regional and express trains (no high-speed trains), light rail systems, trams and buses. And with the motorways often crowded, this may be your best option to get around the major cities.

On the other hand public transport is often only rudimentary in the rural areas. If you're heading for the countryside, you may think about bringing your own vehicle.

See[edit][add listing]

Do[edit][add listing]

Eat[edit][add listing]

Drink[edit][add listing]

Beer. (Bier)

Sleep[edit][add listing]

Get out[edit]



This article is an outline and needs more content. It has a template, but there is not enough information present. Please plunge forward and help it grow!

Variants

Actions

Destination Docents

In other languages

other sites