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Jambiani

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Tanzania : Zanzibar : Jambiani
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Jambiani is a small village on the southeast coast of Zanzibar.

Understand[edit]

Jambiani is a tiny fishing village with a handful of guesthouses, hotels, and resorts serving a range of budgets. Just south of the villages of Bwejuu and Paje.

Get in[edit]

Dalla-dallas or taxis are available from Stone Town. Many hotels and guesthouses also run shuttles back and forth - you will have to talk to the establishment and reserve this ahead of time. The trip takes about 1 1/2-2 hours.

Get around[edit]

Jambiani is tiny and everything is easy walking distance. It's not a barefoot lifestyle though - the road through the village is composed of very sharp rocks. The locals don't seem to have any trouble, but tender tourist feet beware! Also, make sure you are dressed modestly whenever venturing away from the beach. Zanzibar is mostly Muslim and while bathing suits are acceptable on the beach and at the resorts, covering up on the street shows respect for the local culture. Men should wear shirts. Women will be fine with a kanga (brightly colored cloth) wrapped around.

It is also possible to rent bicycles.

Do[edit][add listing]

Walk up and down the pristine beaches, enjoying the white sand and turquoise waters. As in other beaches on the eastern coast, te tide goes out very farThere are many beautiful seashells to gather, but please do not remove them from the beach as they provide homes for various sea creatures.

Take a trip on a dhow (small wooden sailboat). Hotels and guesthouses often run trips, and there are also usually touts walking up and down the beach offering trips. You can just go for a sail or go out to the coral reef and snorkel. The coral reef here is not as spectacular as you would find in the Great Barrier Reef, for example, but it is still possible to see many types of coral, starfish, sea urchins, tropical fish, and sometimes octopuses.

Buy[edit][add listing]

There isn't much shopping in Jambiani; anything you might need should be purchased in Stone Town. There are a few small convenience stores that sell packaged snacks, drinks, and water (not chilled) and some basic household goods like soap.

If you spend any time on the beach at all, you will probably be approached by someone (usually children) selling seashells and coral. Please refrain from purchasing anything, no matter how beautiful the shells or how cute the kids, as shell removal from the beach deprives sea creatures of a home.

Eat[edit][add listing]

Seafood is the name of the game here. Other dishes are available if you're averse, but the fish and shellfish are lovely and fresh. Traditional Zanzibar cuisine is influenced by the trading partners of the old Swahili Coast - the Middle East, India, and Southeast Asia. Spices abound and you will nearly always find something with curry or coconut (or both) on the menu. The hotel restaurants also usually have a "tourist menu" with pasta and pizza.

  • Coral Rock Beach Bungalows and Hotel, [1]. Has a nice restaurant, though somewhat pricey. The location of the restaurant is the real draw - it is perched on a headland and overlooks the beach and the ocean. Service seems to take an absurd amount of time (well over an hour), so you are advised to order your food well in advance. The hotel has a small infinity pool just down the path from the restaurant; this is an excellent place to while away the hours before dinner.  edit
  • Kimte Beach Inn, [2]. Next door to Coral Rock (to the south), has a limited menu available at the bar.  edit
  • Shadowbar, (S6° 18' 25.74 E39° 32' 36.42). This is a small, but unique bar. It is owned by a group of creative and peaceful guys, who have quite a skill in cooking. The menu is limited to what they have in stock, but the seasoning is gorgeous.  edit


Drink[edit][add listing]

The water bottled and sold in Zanzibar is very slightly salty, so if that bothers you, make sure you buy water that was bottled on the mainland. Bars and restaurants serve the usual assortment of cocktails as well as local beers. You can also get fresh-squeezed fruit juices and smoothies.

  • Kimte Beach Inn, [3]. Chilled-out bar right on the beach, complete with hammocks and a nightly bonfire. Headquarters for the local Rasta population: expect some drum circles and "cigarettes." Party goes all night long.  edit
  • Shadowbar, (S6° 18' 25.74 E39° 32' 36.42). This is a small, but unique bar. It is owned by a group of creative and peaceful guys, who don't know how to be in a hurry. Ask for fresh blended fruit juice - you will never forget that experience.  edit


Sleep[edit][add listing]

  • Red Monkey Lodge, +255 777 713366 (), [4]. Step up from the basic accommodation at Kimte, not quite as luxurious (or expensive) as some of the resorts. Claims to eschew "mass tourism" in favor of a more integrative experience. Recommended by Responsible Travel [5]. 12 rooms.  edit
  • Kimte Beach Inn, +255778832824 (), [6]. Used to be run by a chilled-out group on Rastas. Under new management now. Six private rooms and one dormitory with seven beds.  edit

Contact[edit]

Get out[edit]


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